3

votes

Natural Disaster Prep?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 03, 2011 at 12:11 PM

Okay, I tried to find this in the actual questions search, but perhaps it has never been asked? If it has, let me know.

Let me get to the point now, we have a pretty big typhoon coming our way here [Okinawa] Just wondering what kind of things you keep [or would keep] in your natural disaster kit? I keep telling myself to order some PaleoKits to keep us covered, but none of the typhoons lately have been too extreme, however now I am completely regretting it, because people are saying we might be stuck inside for a day and a half, some are saying two days. I have stocked up on water, nuts, jerky, tuna packets, and stuff for the kids. We also have flash lights, first aid kit, etcetc. What else would you put in there? It's too late for me to go back out to the store now, but input for the next time would be much appreciated!

Also, would you try to keep as paleo as possible during a natural disaster? Or if you don't have any gluten sensitivities, would you stock bread?


ETA:

THANK YOU Everyone that responded :] It is much appreciated! Can I really only chose one to be the best answer? This is hard since you all had amazing points.

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on August 04, 2011
at 12:54 AM

Tanka bars! And jars of coconut oil and ghee. And a high quality water purifier just in case you run out, like a camping water purifier or similar that doesn't require electricity.

D5e5788865a3d9a17a729097186e465f

on August 04, 2011
at 12:40 AM

Mmm beans and rice. Thank you so much for posting :] Crazy to see how long people have gone without things like electricity, and here I am complaining about the possibility of two days! I will have to look in to that solar charger! Might come in handy :]

D5e5788865a3d9a17a729097186e465f

on August 04, 2011
at 12:36 AM

Oh forgot to say, I tried to sign up for Im Ok, only works if you have a US cellphone? We have the red cross here, so family members will be able to call them to ask if we are okay.

D5e5788865a3d9a17a729097186e465f

on August 04, 2011
at 12:35 AM

Amazing post, and TONS of things I never thought of. Thankfully it looks like our storm is dying down, so I am hoping it keeps dying down haha! So I can be better prepared next time.

Bbb65ec11a5cecf3a5fd9f400c979854

(124)

on August 03, 2011
at 10:03 PM

They didn't have Im ok six years ago. This is good to know! Thanks!

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on August 03, 2011
at 06:39 PM

Opps Im Ok is at http://imokapp.appspot.com/

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on August 03, 2011
at 06:39 PM

Let me add that if you live in a flood zone or storm surge zone in the US PLEASE plan to go to a shelter or other safe place. And Im Ok is useful for notifications. I know at least in Florida there is a plan for connectivity on an intermittent basis (satellite trailers that will roam between shelters and service points) so I don't plan to be without any connectivity.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on August 03, 2011
at 05:51 PM

Awesome response. Especially the last paragraph.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on August 03, 2011
at 01:01 PM

And a crate if you live in the US, they are required for most pet friendly shelters.

D3ff004d4a0c42b67cc2c49a5ee9c0f3

(5801)

on August 03, 2011
at 12:49 PM

and food for your pets.

D5e5788865a3d9a17a729097186e465f

on August 03, 2011
at 12:19 PM

I wish! No where to run on this island though!

B1fcaceba952861d0324bdb291edbbe0

(3159)

on August 03, 2011
at 12:13 PM

Run for your life.

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3 Answers

best answer

4
Bbb65ec11a5cecf3a5fd9f400c979854

on August 03, 2011
at 04:39 PM

I went through Katrina, and the biggest thing I learned was that few people are really prepared for AFTER the disaster, i.e. not survival so much as simply getting through the day-to-day stuff without losing your frakking mind.

Be prepared for several weeks with no power and, probably, no gasoline (or very limited access). Depending on the type of disaster, do what you can to prepare for dealing with heat/cold without climate control. After the storm, the neighbors across the street had a generator, and the closest four houses strung extensions cords so that they could power box fans and survive the 99 degree nights. (Generators, box fans, and window AC units were like GOLD.)

Clothesline and clothespins. If you don't have or can't find clothespins, you can twist two lengths of rope together and then stick ends of your wet clothing through the twists to keep them from blowing away.

Rope. ALWAYS useful.

Chainsaw--oiled/fueled and ready to go. Knives, axes. If you're in an area that might flood or get storm surge, put an ax in your attic. (People were found drowned in their attics because they'd gone there to get away from the rising waters, and got trapped. With an ax you can chop through the roof and escape.)

Flashlights that don't require batteries.

Matches/lighters. Preferably the waterproof kind. Thermal blankets. Put valuable pictures, albums, papers etc in ziplocs/spacebags--and then put those in sealable bags.

If you have kids--books, cards, games, anything that can possibly keep them entertained. If you have babies, stock up like crazy on diapers/wipes. In fact, babywipes are like gold for times when you aren't able to bathe properly. If you're breastfeeding, be prepared for the fact that the stress may drastically affect your supply.

Charcoal and/or a full tank for your gas grill. Brillo pads, bleach, because hot water isn't always available.

Be prepared for the fact that while your tech might be charged, they might still be useless as far as connecting to the outside world. After Katrina most cell phones were fairly useless since many of the repeater stations were destroyed. (Though it turned out that texting was possible, if you were willing to wait 24 hours or so for your messages to go through.) Arrange BEFORE the disaster hits to have a contact outside the disaster zone who can post online or somehow let people know what your status is. (My sister--miraculously--had one land line in the neighborhood that was working. Everyone used it to let someone from out of town know that they were okay, with instructions to get in touch with others and pass the word along. That was how I found out--a week after the storm--that my sister and her family had survived.)

Water, and stuff to flavor the water, because after a while you will get SICK TO DEATH of water. Alcohol will become a tradeable commodity, as well as any other sweets/delicacies that don't require climate control. (Especially for the kids.) And when they say "don't drink the water" that includes teeth brushing. (Learned that lesson the hard way!)

If it looks like it's going to be a bad 'un, get your tetanus and hepatitis vaccinations before it hits.

And, finally, lots of cooperation with your neighbors. The most amazing thing about the disaster was the way that the petty feuds suddenly became utterly meaningless.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on August 03, 2011
at 06:39 PM

Opps Im Ok is at http://imokapp.appspot.com/

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on August 03, 2011
at 06:39 PM

Let me add that if you live in a flood zone or storm surge zone in the US PLEASE plan to go to a shelter or other safe place. And Im Ok is useful for notifications. I know at least in Florida there is a plan for connectivity on an intermittent basis (satellite trailers that will roam between shelters and service points) so I don't plan to be without any connectivity.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on August 03, 2011
at 05:51 PM

Awesome response. Especially the last paragraph.

D5e5788865a3d9a17a729097186e465f

on August 04, 2011
at 12:35 AM

Amazing post, and TONS of things I never thought of. Thankfully it looks like our storm is dying down, so I am hoping it keeps dying down haha! So I can be better prepared next time.

Bbb65ec11a5cecf3a5fd9f400c979854

(124)

on August 03, 2011
at 10:03 PM

They didn't have Im ok six years ago. This is good to know! Thanks!

D5e5788865a3d9a17a729097186e465f

on August 04, 2011
at 12:36 AM

Oh forgot to say, I tried to sign up for Im Ok, only works if you have a US cellphone? We have the red cross here, so family members will be able to call them to ask if we are okay.

8
D3ff004d4a0c42b67cc2c49a5ee9c0f3

(5801)

on August 03, 2011
at 12:47 PM

I used to live in an area that was hit by hurricanes fairly often and in addition to what you keep:

I keep several camp stoves with the appropriate fuel to last 5 days. a way to make coffee using a camp stove. 3 days of MREs almond butter more water than you think you'll need for a week 25 pound sack of rice 25 pounds of beans A couple board games to keep everyone occupied without electricity. raisins, dried bananas and apples NOAA weather radio Solar charger for my cellphone

Beans, rice, and MREs are not exactly paleo but when we were without power for 12 days, it was more comforting to be able to have a hot meal and food in my belly than worrying about if rice is paleo. Also, you'd be surprised at how many of your neighbors are not prepared and helping them with a small meal of beans and rice will create years of good will.

D3ff004d4a0c42b67cc2c49a5ee9c0f3

(5801)

on August 03, 2011
at 12:49 PM

and food for your pets.

1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on August 03, 2011
at 01:01 PM

And a crate if you live in the US, they are required for most pet friendly shelters.

D5e5788865a3d9a17a729097186e465f

on August 04, 2011
at 12:40 AM

Mmm beans and rice. Thank you so much for posting :] Crazy to see how long people have gone without things like electricity, and here I am complaining about the possibility of two days! I will have to look in to that solar charger! Might come in handy :]

3
1568416ef28477d1fa29046218d83ddd

(6235)

on August 03, 2011
at 12:49 PM

I used to have a kit, but I have changed philosophy and now I try to have stock. I have a collection of bottled water and some in the fridge, it gets used and replaced, but I try to keep enough stock for us all.

Nuts and dried fruit are my major plan for food, they are on hand as well. I also tend to have leftovers in the fridge that will get eaten the first day and first and stock in the Fridge that will get eaten the second day (no opening in between).

My medical kit is what I usually have.

The biggest change was in tech. I have started using reusable batteries and try to only buy things that use two or three sizes. With a charging station that means I am stocked up and ready with power and that the batteries for my remote control are never out.

I am tempted to buy a spare cell phone charger and batteries.

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