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Shirataki Noodles - Zero Calories/Net-Carbs?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 07, 2011 at 5:30 PM

I ran across this site selling shirataki noodles. link text

According to the site, they have zero calories & net-carbs. They are also high in water soluble fiber, and they are gluten & soy free.

They are made with Konnyaku flour (Glucomannan) which is derived from the konnyaku imo root.

It almost sounds too good to be true.

Has anyone tried them, and would you consider them to be paleo healthy?

46cca8ea7b1325c286c470182aef053b

(111)

on May 25, 2013
at 12:06 PM

Seconding the YMMV, I love these more than actual noodles. Eating them right now, as a matter of fact! Just gotta wash 'em well before you use them to get the fishy smell out.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on May 25, 2013
at 10:25 AM

I noticed a really "off" flavor the first and only time I made zucchini noodles..

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on May 25, 2013
at 10:22 AM

Seconded as far as them being mixed in goes!!

13db020c06c22c2f8b129034ddc013e4

(340)

on May 16, 2011
at 12:46 AM

My 2-year olds love them. Then again, they don't yet know what a noodle is 'supposed' to taste like.

13db020c06c22c2f8b129034ddc013e4

(340)

on May 16, 2011
at 12:45 AM

YMMV. My wife cooks them all the time, they are tasty. The trick is they'll pick up the flavor of the sauce they're in on account of being thin. So use in e.g. bone broths. Anyway, they're a nice nutritional find so I'd recommend buying a pack and play with them.

D38c0cc994b194de08289e0fe3f99d1e

(421)

on January 08, 2011
at 03:53 AM

Thanks for the reply Ben. I'm trying to move my kid's towards a paleo style diet, and was thinking perhaps that they would enjoy them as an alternative to regular pasta. Based on your comments though, my guess is they would not find them appetizing.

03f5a69fde4012b827ebdb6d93b71e7a

(2007)

on January 07, 2011
at 09:28 PM

I do this, works great for things like a chicken primavera 'pasta'. I use a mandoline and it only takes a few minutes.

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on January 07, 2011
at 09:18 PM

I love blunt. I've never had them, but "they suck" tells me all I need to know. I'm not a big fan of having to put my meat on top of something, but occasionally dig some spaghetti squash (I'm not as low carb as others on here) or mashed or riced cauliflower.

00fe9c58f7020500007bd5f9638747fa

on January 07, 2011
at 06:36 PM

This idea is important ;) "You don't need something to put your food on. Just eat your food" hahaha

  • D38c0cc994b194de08289e0fe3f99d1e

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14 Answers

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2
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on January 07, 2011
at 08:55 PM

I lived in japan for five years. I started using them there. Unlike many things that people think are common over there and actually are not, these actually are widely available over there. Like others have said, when I was trying to wean myself off of carbohydrate bases I used them but now I never buy them.

I hate to be blunt, but they suck. They are very slippery, which is fine if you're raised in a culture where that texture isn't considered odd but for most Americans sor Europeans I'd wager that they would be pretty unappetizing. any italian style sauce slips off completely.

Try them and see what you think. They may be just the tool you need in an interim period of food transition; and who knows you may be one of the few who have no problems with them whatsoever. Love to hear how it goes, though. Let us know.

D38c0cc994b194de08289e0fe3f99d1e

(421)

on January 08, 2011
at 03:53 AM

Thanks for the reply Ben. I'm trying to move my kid's towards a paleo style diet, and was thinking perhaps that they would enjoy them as an alternative to regular pasta. Based on your comments though, my guess is they would not find them appetizing.

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on January 07, 2011
at 09:18 PM

I love blunt. I've never had them, but "they suck" tells me all I need to know. I'm not a big fan of having to put my meat on top of something, but occasionally dig some spaghetti squash (I'm not as low carb as others on here) or mashed or riced cauliflower.

13db020c06c22c2f8b129034ddc013e4

(340)

on May 16, 2011
at 12:45 AM

YMMV. My wife cooks them all the time, they are tasty. The trick is they'll pick up the flavor of the sauce they're in on account of being thin. So use in e.g. bone broths. Anyway, they're a nice nutritional find so I'd recommend buying a pack and play with them.

13db020c06c22c2f8b129034ddc013e4

(340)

on May 16, 2011
at 12:46 AM

My 2-year olds love them. Then again, they don't yet know what a noodle is 'supposed' to taste like.

46cca8ea7b1325c286c470182aef053b

(111)

on May 25, 2013
at 12:06 PM

Seconding the YMMV, I love these more than actual noodles. Eating them right now, as a matter of fact! Just gotta wash 'em well before you use them to get the fishy smell out.

2
378decbe216b0c7d79d5f8f5eeaae76a

on May 25, 2013
at 05:14 AM

I just tried them for the first time. The Angel Hair "Miracle Noodle" - $2.69 package from Whole Foods. Rinsed them, boiled them for 2 minutes, put them on a paper towel, then mixed them with some ground beef and Arrabiata sauce (low sugar/carb). They're amazing. A bit rubbery, and tasteless on their own, but tasted fine when mixed in with the meat & sauce. For a zero carb noodle substitute, fantastic. Highly recommend you give them a shot.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on May 25, 2013
at 10:22 AM

Seconded as far as them being mixed in goes!!

1
6a4fd73b4ae4761eefec8e0d38e6f224

(1008)

on May 15, 2011
at 08:27 PM

I have used them, and I do like them, but they are... I won't say an acquired taste, as you never really learn to love them, but you do get used to them. They're a bit labor-intensive, as you have to rinse them VERY well and dry them before using them. You'll want to cook them, but not more than a few minutes, otherwise they get rubbery. Also, the shipping charges on that site are astronomical (though I can get an identical product at my local Whole Foods).

Honestly, if you want noodles without the noodles, get yourself one of these spiral slicers. It's only 30 bucks, and it quickly pays for itself. Zucchini, rutabaga, daikon, turnip, and no doubt some other vegetables make fabulous noodles. (Rutabaga is my favorite as it stays firm when you cook it, approximating pasta in texture.) Also useful and about the same price is a good mandoline (I have this one): If you score a zucchini lengthwise into a few narrow sections but don't cut all the way through, then slice it thin on the mandoline, you get nice linguine-style "noodles." Just be sure to USE THE SAFETY GUARD. I've julienned my fingers on more than one occasion.

1
531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

on January 07, 2011
at 06:06 PM

They sound quite terrible to me. Disclaimer: I have not tried them. Note that I went through a period where I was trying to find something to put food on top of. All the stews and curries I used to put on top of rice...or pasta sauces that I was quite good at making. I have finally adapted my recipes to get them the way I like them. I no longer require a "base" carbohydrate. Thus, over 30 years of habituation hath ended.

If one is wedded to the idea of a base, perhaps squash pasta is the least offensive. I considered it at one time. But as I've gone lower and lower with the carbohydrates, and simpler and simpler with the recipes, I just no longer bother with these thoughts.

00fe9c58f7020500007bd5f9638747fa

on January 07, 2011
at 06:36 PM

This idea is important ;) "You don't need something to put your food on. Just eat your food" hahaha

1
77732bf6bf2b8a360f523ef87c3b7523

(6157)

on January 07, 2011
at 05:42 PM

I have no opinion on this, but it's a topic that has come up before on PaleoHacks.

http://paleohacks.com/questions/12450/what-do-you-think-about-shirataki-noodles#axzz1AN9cQhaO

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on February 10, 2014
at 04:03 PM

I like having noodles to slurp in soup and stir fry, and find shirataki noodles more satisfying texture-wise than other substitutes. But to me, their weird texture is off-putting in pasta sauce type dishes.

Hint: you can find these is Asian markets and Asian sections of regular supermarkets (in communities that serve Asian populations) a LOT cheaper than online or supermarket sections aimed at "dieters".

0
0dfb939883c96cb6f8b92365dd50ea67

on February 10, 2014
at 12:33 AM

I use Miracle Noodles (and rice) in many dishes. For Italian/Pasta replacement, try the ones with Spinach. They are "stickier" so sauces hold better.

I like to add them to my pasta sauce as it cools down or 5min before serving.

Note: Don't add them to a meal you're planning to freeze as they don't thaw too well...

0
A222826e1681a414c489af160215c50a

on June 15, 2013
at 03:27 AM

Used Miracle Rice for the first time this evening. I made a homemade tomato sauce consisting of sautéed onions, red bell pepper, mushrooms, garlic and diced tomatoes. I added Italian seasoning, salt and pepper to the sauce and simmered it for several hours. I then purred the sauce with a stick blender. I browned some Italian chicken sausage and added the (rinsed) Miracle Rice. Cooked out much of the excess moisture and then added the tomato sauce. Mixed the tomato sauce into the sausage mixture and stuffed into blanched green peppers. They turned out great. I though they tasted the same as stuffed peppers using rice/sausage mixture.

0
C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on May 25, 2013
at 10:22 AM

We actually really love them. But.. I guess its a kind of a cheat in a way because for example the "rice" I will mix with sprouted real wild rice. The mixture is light, fiber filled and doesnt cause blood sugar issues. At the same time the texture and taste is very satisfying and matches well with a nice steak!! The rice isnt horrible by itself with enough butter but it will never taste like rice because of the texture.

As for the noodles.. well.. They are great in a stir fry type dish where they are not the "star". But yeah they are NOT like regular pasta. No starchy mouth feel and they are really rubbery. But.. mixed even if very uneven portions 4parts shirataki to 1 part brown rice pasta they are pretty fantastic.

0
183f5c49a7a9548b6f5238d1f33cb35e

on May 15, 2011
at 10:19 PM

Word of caution if you have sensitive bowels - they made me EXTREMELY gassy and messed up my bowel movements for a few days. Good as a transition food and in sukiyaki/nabemono, but that's it...

0
115c2185c267b25c201d18cd83989f11

(0)

on May 15, 2011
at 07:57 PM

I was skepticle... I like them with chicken broth and very little soy sauce and pepper... great fiber, great filler... I am on the HCG diet and needed something to fill me up... I used the angel hair noodle and rinsed in cool water then blanched for 1 minute in boiling water then let simmer in organic chicken broth with a little light soy sauce and black pepper added it to my plate with lean steak and it really was much better than I expected plus very filling and guilt free eating... i understand it looks the same way coming out but is excellent fiber! So I will be buying more and doing stir fry dishes and lets just face it... it is easy to use, great as a filler, takes on flavor of any sauces... it's a no brainer for me

0
8632c87a833f1d30f5fa8d4768d10c45

on January 07, 2011
at 07:31 PM

I've had them quite often in the past when I was following a low calorie, high fiber, low fat approach... I agree that they work best with Asian inspired dishes, but I also use to use them for Italian pasta substitution. They have a funny smell and texture, but once you rinse them thoroughly in hot water they basically smell and taste like nothing and take on the flavors of whatever it is you're mixing them with. They are basically just a calorie-free filler.

Now that base my meals around fats and proteins, I don’t crave any calories-free "fillers".

0
9e2180e7bfd688eb52d4f0c536172024

(2004)

on January 07, 2011
at 06:55 PM

I've tried these, but don't like them well enough to buy them now. They taste best in Asian recipes as opposed to Italian pasta dishes. I like to use zucchini as a pasta substitute. It's labor intensive to slice them into 'noodles' but worth it.

03f5a69fde4012b827ebdb6d93b71e7a

(2007)

on January 07, 2011
at 09:28 PM

I do this, works great for things like a chicken primavera 'pasta'. I use a mandoline and it only takes a few minutes.

C836b2644e7319bb957fbb794a97708e

on May 25, 2013
at 10:25 AM

I noticed a really "off" flavor the first and only time I made zucchini noodles..

0
00fe9c58f7020500007bd5f9638747fa

on January 07, 2011
at 06:02 PM

It seems to come from a root, and should be all right. However, there's still nothing to it - spagetti squash seems like a better route if you NEED a "noodle". You can also do kelp noodles which are good for iodine.

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