8

votes

Sour cream vs. yogurt ?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 19, 2010 at 10:22 AM

My local shop was out of greek yogurt last week so I started to use sour cream for my dessert. I mix half a cup of yogurt and a spoon of cocoa so the original yogurt/sour cream taste is pretty much overwhelmed by the aroma of cocoa.

Flavor is irrelevant in my cocoa case, so I started thinking why even bother with Greek yogurt anymore and since sour cream is cheaper and more available in my area and did a showdown :)

Nutrition value

Sour Cream Kcal: 215 Protein: 2,4 g Carbohydrates: 3 g Fat: 21,5 g Saturated fat: 13 Omega 6: 23 mg Omega 3: 625 mg

Greek yogurt Kcal: 130 Protein: 6,6 g Carbohydrates: 3 g Fat: 10 g Saturated fat: 8g

Yogurt has potentially more casein (haven't beeen able to find any data though) while lactose content is probably quite small in both, due to low carbohydrate content. Calories I care not so the only thing left is fat content which is twice as big in sour cream so yay.

Fermentation agents.

Sour Cream : Lactococcus lactis

Greek yogurt : Lactobacillus bulgaricus (helpful to sufferers of lactose intolerance) Streptococcus thermophilus (does not survive the stomach in healthy human)

If I understand things correctly only yogurt would be helpful for lactose intolerant people but both provide beneficial gut flora bacteria.

Final verdict for me - Sour cream.

Which one do you prefer and why ?

Medium avatar

(115)

on April 07, 2013
at 01:41 AM

thhq, what was the bad result with the goat yogurt? If you mean it was runny, that is how it usually should be when using goat. Goat milk has different proteins that don't synthesize the same was as cow's milk.

4f1b5248fa85c735438f8a3bca274971

(97)

on October 27, 2012
at 08:59 PM

Chicken paprika sounds good. where is the recipe?

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on October 27, 2012
at 11:44 AM

I always forget about making cooked sauces like this with sour cream. With mushrooms sounds really good--definitely trying this!

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on October 27, 2012
at 06:23 AM

Wallaby organic european sour cream doesn't get re-pasteurized and it has the added benefit of being completely cream. No dried milk thickener added! When we still lived in the US I used to feed that stuff to my toddler on a spoon.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 26, 2012
at 07:34 PM

I asked that question of PaleoBob above. I've tried cow's milk yogurt for starter in goat's milk and had bad results. Is there a place to get sour cream with live culture? If not I might try making yogurt with half-and-half. If it works I'd expect something the consistency of cream cheese.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 26, 2012
at 07:30 PM

Let us know how it turns out. What will you use for culture?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on October 26, 2012
at 04:07 PM

good point. missed that!

76211ec5301087de2588cfe3d6bccba9

(1178)

on October 26, 2012
at 03:54 PM

I didn't know that...that's too bad. must make DIY creme fraiche

76211ec5301087de2588cfe3d6bccba9

(1178)

on October 26, 2012
at 03:54 PM

I would bet the OP's serving size is 4oz

6eb2812b40855ba64508cbf2dc48f1b6

(2119)

on August 21, 2010
at 11:49 AM

I adore mascarpone. I could certainly sit down and eat the whole tub, but I mostly don't buy it because it's wicked expensive.

95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on August 20, 2010
at 08:34 PM

Sure, but when I'm making curry, throwing in all those ingredients and there's still a bit of that high-fat yogurt on the spoon, I like that, too. :-)

Ab6d5fded95559985919961c62b1847d

(434)

on August 20, 2010
at 08:23 AM

My understanding was that yogurt has a lot of casein while cream only has traces. I could be totally off though.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 20, 2010
at 06:37 AM

Will try. Thank you.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 20, 2010
at 06:36 AM

Oh, come on John :D You know when you are making a soup, throwing all those tasty ingredients and there is still a bit of sour cream on the spoon. Yum, yum, yum :D

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 20, 2010
at 06:34 AM

My first thought was "LOLZ LOLZ LOLZ what's with the fake mascarpone" :D Seriously though, mascarpone in my country (and I'm pretty sure in all West/Central Europe) has 35 or 54g of fat. 13 g sounds like a light version ? Anyway, as far as I know mascarpone isn't a pro/prebiotic but due to low carbohydate content I would probably be OK for lactose intolerant. Also the texture of mascarpone is much creamier then sour cream in my opinion. Plus I have/had a mascarpone addiction so I eat/ate the whole content (250g/1 cup) in one sitting :blushes:

9d43f6873107e17ca4d1a5055aa7a2ad

on August 19, 2010
at 12:47 PM

Sour cream = awesome chicken paprika!

  • 84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

    asked by

    (2399)
  • Views
    17.9K
  • Last Activity
    1428D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

14 Answers

2
Cf0ba3530174231218544654aaa7d45c

on October 26, 2012
at 03:35 PM

Sour cream is re-pasteurized to stop the fermentation process before it is sold in stores. So both providing beneficial gut flora is unfortunately incorrect. However making your own yogurt is really easy by simply adding a tiny bit of live yogurt or a culture package to milk and incubating for 8-10 hours. Making your own sour cream is probably similar, however they use a different culture array. http://www.differencebetween.net/object/comparisons-of-food-items/difference-between-yogurt-and-sour-cream/

76211ec5301087de2588cfe3d6bccba9

(1178)

on October 26, 2012
at 03:54 PM

I didn't know that...that's too bad. must make DIY creme fraiche

1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

(10904)

on October 27, 2012
at 06:23 AM

Wallaby organic european sour cream doesn't get re-pasteurized and it has the added benefit of being completely cream. No dried milk thickener added! When we still lived in the US I used to feed that stuff to my toddler on a spoon.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 26, 2012
at 07:34 PM

I asked that question of PaleoBob above. I've tried cow's milk yogurt for starter in goat's milk and had bad results. Is there a place to get sour cream with live culture? If not I might try making yogurt with half-and-half. If it works I'd expect something the consistency of cream cheese.

Medium avatar

(115)

on April 07, 2013
at 01:41 AM

thhq, what was the bad result with the goat yogurt? If you mean it was runny, that is how it usually should be when using goat. Goat milk has different proteins that don't synthesize the same was as cow's milk.

2
9bc6f3df8db981f67ea1465411958c8d

on August 20, 2010
at 03:26 AM

Considering that sour cream is soured cream and yogurt is soured milk and that, like you said, the fat content is much higher in fermented cream, my vote goes for sour cream.

I make my own yogurt and I'm considering switching to fermenting cream instead of whole milk. When you do this, you also control what bacterial strains you put in and the same strains that work well with milk will work with cream. Good quality grass-fed cream is not cheap though around here.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on October 26, 2012
at 07:30 PM

Let us know how it turns out. What will you use for culture?

2
667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on August 19, 2010
at 01:59 PM

I like the sour cream overall a bit more. Sometimes i feel a hankering for nice greek yogurt but yeah the sour cream is the goodness. I think one of the whole reasons for the popularity of yogurt is that most of them are substantially less calorically-dense than the sour creams. Saturated far-fear probably plays a big role, too. Although you would lose the fermented goodness of it, you could try whipping your own cream at home and using that for the dessert. I think its fun to whip cream on the spot, makes you enjoy your food more and its kinda cool to show people how easy it is (dinner guests and kids, etc).

1
Ce3e8dba49234f664871518b60f57443

(115)

on October 26, 2012
at 08:25 PM

Another possibility is kefir.

1
47a42b6be94caf700fce9509e38bb6a4

(9647)

on August 19, 2010
at 11:10 PM

Or creme fraiche, which you can make yourself from cream and save some bucks. (It's really easy; directions can be found, among other places, in Nourishing Traditions.)

My general statement is that I like the taste of yogurt by itself but prefer cream, sour cream, and creme fraiche mixed into sauces and things. Yogurt for flavor, cream and its variants for the saturated fat I need.

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 20, 2010
at 06:37 AM

Will try. Thank you.

1
B4aa2df25a6bf17d22556667ff896170

(851)

on August 19, 2010
at 12:59 PM

what about marscapone cheese? similar consistency..

calories: 130 fat: 13g Carbs: 1g Protein: 2g

not sure about the probiotics or lactose intolerance though

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 20, 2010
at 06:34 AM

My first thought was "LOLZ LOLZ LOLZ what's with the fake mascarpone" :D Seriously though, mascarpone in my country (and I'm pretty sure in all West/Central Europe) has 35 or 54g of fat. 13 g sounds like a light version ? Anyway, as far as I know mascarpone isn't a pro/prebiotic but due to low carbohydate content I would probably be OK for lactose intolerant. Also the texture of mascarpone is much creamier then sour cream in my opinion. Plus I have/had a mascarpone addiction so I eat/ate the whole content (250g/1 cup) in one sitting :blushes:

6eb2812b40855ba64508cbf2dc48f1b6

(2119)

on August 21, 2010
at 11:49 AM

I adore mascarpone. I could certainly sit down and eat the whole tub, but I mostly don't buy it because it's wicked expensive.

0
9c908d4b5a0b78e86feba95a7619ab83

on October 27, 2012
at 08:04 AM

Sour cream is very popular over there, I'm from Russia . if you buy raw sour cream at the farmers market it can contain as much as 45-50g fat per 100g , yummy! Mushrooms , simmered in sour cream is a traditional Russian meal that tastes delicious. It's also usually added to soups and salads.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on October 27, 2012
at 11:44 AM

I always forget about making cooked sauces like this with sour cream. With mushrooms sounds really good--definitely trying this!

0
1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

on October 27, 2012
at 06:31 AM

We moved to europe recently so I'm assuming these products are still availible in the states but we used to go between Wallaby organics european sour cream which is NOT re-pasteurized after culturing and is one of the only brands besides daisy that is 100% cream instead of cream and skim milk + thickeners which is whats in most of the brands out there including the organic. My son loved that stuff. I'd add a little bit of fruit or honey to it and he'd just lap it up.

Our other option was to buy seven stars creamery yogurt and strain overnight then make it nice and smooth in the food processor. I didn't like all the thickeners in the Greek yogurts and most of them skimmed some of the fat off even when they claimed to be full fat. Real Greek yogurt should have at LEAST 10% fat per serving, while brands like Fage run around with about about 5% and claim to be full fat. (Fage used to be more authentic but they changed their practices and started skimming the cream.) Obviously the culture in seven stars is different than the one used for traditional greek yogurt but I like my food less processed and skimmed milk powder is gross.

0
59fa7cd87fb9d669adf21e5cf3e7ada5

on October 26, 2012
at 08:26 PM

The Paleo approach is to always chose the product that contains more fat

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on October 26, 2012
at 03:42 PM

The greek yogurt stats surprise me. I just checked the brand I get, and a single serving is 310 calories with 23g fat 18g saturated fat. Are you getting low fat greek yogurt?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on October 26, 2012
at 04:07 PM

good point. missed that!

76211ec5301087de2588cfe3d6bccba9

(1178)

on October 26, 2012
at 03:54 PM

I would bet the OP's serving size is 4oz

0
Ab6d5fded95559985919961c62b1847d

(434)

on August 20, 2010
at 08:18 AM

My personal preference would be sour cream since I cannot stand unsweetened yogurt and I find sour cream to be more versatile for my cooking. I also choose sour cream because yogurt has too much casein for me.

0
Bbb993c8dacf76dd461703a82686c06a

(135)

on August 20, 2010
at 02:33 AM

My favorite is the Greek yogurt, but I have recently given it up once I heard about the high insulin index of 115. I wonder if the insulin index is based on low-fat yogurt, as I used to eat full-fat greek yogurt.

I started adding a little avocado to my cocoa and greek yogurt to hopefully tamp down the effects of the insulin.

I think the answer is moderation and variety -- some cream greek yogurt and sour cream, but not everyday.

0
95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on August 19, 2010
at 08:11 PM

Must we have a preference? :-) I prefer sour cream in some things (tex-mex type sauces, for instance) and yogurt in others (curries, for instance.) I tend not to eat dairy straight (except for a very occasional bit of cheese), so expressing a straight-up preference for one over the other seems kind of beside the point. I guess I prefer the one that works best with the other flavors at hand. They are definitely different, and at least for me, not really interchangeable.

95ab15c8ef50ff0daf87ccbdd52cd3b8

(2384)

on August 20, 2010
at 08:34 PM

Sure, but when I'm making curry, throwing in all those ingredients and there's still a bit of that high-fat yogurt on the spoon, I like that, too. :-)

84666a86108dee8d11cbbc85b6382083

(2399)

on August 20, 2010
at 06:36 AM

Oh, come on John :D You know when you are making a soup, throwing all those tasty ingredients and there is still a bit of sour cream on the spoon. Yum, yum, yum :D

0
E3267155f6962f293583fc6a0b98793e

(1085)

on August 19, 2010
at 10:57 AM

Sounds like a winner to me. Thanks for posting this. I like sour cream just as much if not more than Greek yogurt. I have done the same with cocoa in sour cream.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!