1

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Making Yogurt with Raw Milk

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 10, 2013 at 10:43 PM

I want to make Raw Milk yogurt by the Viili culture starter from Cultures for Health, but it says if using Raw Milk, that it has to be heated to 160 degrees and cooled, before using it to make yogurt. Isn't the point of using Raw Milk not to heat it and ruin the vitamins? Would cooking it to this temperature basically make it pointless to use Raw Milk or is this temperature low enough to keep the vitamins intact? Also what are we supposed to do, hold a thermometer in it until it's done heating?

**EDIT I also want to buy kefir, but kefir needs to be made every single day to keep. Do I have to make the yogurt every day too? It'd be hard to have kefir AND yogurt everyday (even though I'm sure it's tasty haha) Or how do you guys do this so that it doesn't go bad?

Ba913e2cc77984c1b2079adfe3fd9f93

(128)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

@thhq That's exactly what happened to me, so now I use a known pure culture, which I reculture with ordinary supermarket milk. This is also what Cultures for Health recommends. You do not need a large amount, since you are not consuming this one.

2a80e4e1903631a8e01e0355634b9abd

(25)

on January 13, 2013
at 08:24 PM

Thanks Andrew. Hadn't heard of matsoni culture. I always use a greek yoghurt form the supermarket for my culture if i've got no yoghurt let. Googling it shows there are reports of it being a runny/ drinking yoghurt? Amber: you heat the milk and let cool for yoghurt only. Kefir is best made with raw milk,not pasteurised.

C23148e16a4dd05351d1902a69097d65

(753)

on January 13, 2013
at 05:14 PM

whats the taste difference between matsoni and viili?

Medium avatar

(10601)

on January 13, 2013
at 01:31 PM

After an experience with a local dairyman smoking cigarettes while he was milking, and being on my great grandparent's filthy dairy farm, I'm more cautious.

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on January 13, 2013
at 12:08 PM

You just need to find a source you trust. When my daughter was one, I started a raw milk coop in my town using a farm with just three cows nearby with weekly deliveries. She is now nine, and none of the many families in the coop have ever had a problem with the milk.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on January 13, 2013
at 04:52 AM

I reculture with the yogurt I have made. This can work for many months, but usually something goes off - grainy texture or complete failure - and I have to restart.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on January 13, 2013
at 04:47 AM

It works until you get milk contaminated with feces....then Nourishing Traditions are replaced by traditional diarrhea and vomiting....

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on January 12, 2013
at 08:52 AM

Mark, I forgot to mention that I put the kefir in the fridge when I am leaving it for any length of time. Matsoni yogurt doesn't need to have the milk heated - it sets without.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on January 12, 2013
at 08:51 AM

When I'm leaving the kefir for a few days / weeks, I do put it into the fridge. Matsoni yogurt doesn't need to have the milk heated and cultures at about 65 / 70° F. Very easy stuff!

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on January 11, 2013
at 07:48 PM

Villi is a type of yogurt that does not need to be heated. It also has a slightly different texture. Check out http://www.dyno-mom.com/p/viili-101.html for more info

C23148e16a4dd05351d1902a69097d65

(753)

on January 11, 2013
at 04:55 PM

Also you only heat up the milk for yogurt right, not for kefir? And do you just let both of them sit on top of the fridge? I'm considering using a dehydrator, but not sure if its nessecary.

C23148e16a4dd05351d1902a69097d65

(753)

on January 11, 2013
at 04:52 PM

Does this seem like a goodd way to do it https://www.healthhomehappy.com/2011/07/making-scdgaps-yogurt-in-the-dehydrator.html ? She says to get rid of all the lactose it has to be in a temperature environment of 100 degrees the entire time. I thought that as long as it ferments for 24 hours that it was lactose free? Thoughts on this?

C23148e16a4dd05351d1902a69097d65

(753)

on January 11, 2013
at 04:46 PM

So you can just let both the kefir grains and the yogurt sit in the fridge for a few days if you wanna take a break? Thank you!

C23148e16a4dd05351d1902a69097d65

(753)

on January 11, 2013
at 04:32 PM

So if you"re away you just let the kefir grains sit in milk in the fridge? Also in terms of the yogurt how long does that keep?

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on January 11, 2013
at 01:31 PM

I use a cooler. I transfer to quart jars and put in a cooler wrapped in towels in the warmest area of the house for up to 24 hours.

089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on January 11, 2013
at 01:07 AM

i doubt room temp would work for most people unless you live in the amazon. i just had a yogurt bomb. tried it doing the oven method with the light on and it only stayed at 70 F. that's usually what a room tempurature is and my yogurt was milk consistency after 24 hrs.

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on January 11, 2013
at 12:30 AM

I do sometimes...but I admit to being bit casual (like when I used to make bread with water temp)...you can kind of tell by how it feels when you stick your finger in.

C23148e16a4dd05351d1902a69097d65

(753)

on January 11, 2013
at 12:03 AM

that would be much easier haha! thanks. do you use a thermometer when heating it?

C23148e16a4dd05351d1902a69097d65

(753)

on January 11, 2013
at 12:02 AM

So you heat to 110, let it cool, and then mix in the starter and make as usual? Also where do you keep it to keep it at that temperature?

C23148e16a4dd05351d1902a69097d65

(753)

on January 11, 2013
at 12:01 AM

Oh so no heating? I'll try this thanks!

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12 Answers

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1
2a80e4e1903631a8e01e0355634b9abd

on January 11, 2013
at 03:33 PM

I make Kefir and yoghurt. With regards to Kefir, I do exactly the same as andrew, except it'll be in the fridge if im away that long

when making yoghurt you have to heat the raw milk to high temperatures first. I dont think you can make raw milk yoghurt just by warming it. I have tried it and it never sets, but just curdles into a runny mess.

I heat the milk to 80C continuously stirring on the stove and then let cool. You will notice the milk is now much sweeter to the taste (its not the same as pasteurization which I think is about 70C and very quick). I am no food scientist but it seems the proteins or sugars are transformed and this is why that step is vital to yoghurt making.

I highly doubt you are ruining the vitamins by heating in. The vitamins are dissolved in the fat and the culture will making its own B vitamins and enzymes when setting the yoghurt (correct me if i' wrong)

C23148e16a4dd05351d1902a69097d65

(753)

on January 11, 2013
at 04:32 PM

So if you"re away you just let the kefir grains sit in milk in the fridge? Also in terms of the yogurt how long does that keep?

C23148e16a4dd05351d1902a69097d65

(753)

on January 11, 2013
at 04:55 PM

Also you only heat up the milk for yogurt right, not for kefir? And do you just let both of them sit on top of the fridge? I'm considering using a dehydrator, but not sure if its nessecary.

C23148e16a4dd05351d1902a69097d65

(753)

on January 11, 2013
at 04:46 PM

So you can just let both the kefir grains and the yogurt sit in the fridge for a few days if you wanna take a break? Thank you!

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on January 12, 2013
at 08:52 AM

Mark, I forgot to mention that I put the kefir in the fridge when I am leaving it for any length of time. Matsoni yogurt doesn't need to have the milk heated - it sets without.

2a80e4e1903631a8e01e0355634b9abd

(25)

on January 13, 2013
at 08:24 PM

Thanks Andrew. Hadn't heard of matsoni culture. I always use a greek yoghurt form the supermarket for my culture if i've got no yoghurt let. Googling it shows there are reports of it being a runny/ drinking yoghurt? Amber: you heat the milk and let cool for yoghurt only. Kefir is best made with raw milk,not pasteurised.

3
Ba913e2cc77984c1b2079adfe3fd9f93

on January 10, 2013
at 11:02 PM

I just culture it in a clean Mason jar at room temperature. It works. I have been doing it this way for more than a year.

I'm using the Viili from Cultures for Health also.

Check out the Wikipedia page on fermented milk products:

http://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermented_milk_products

All the ones called mesophilic (including Viili and Matsoni) will culture at room temperature; the thermophilic ones need to be heated.

You do not need to culture every other day. The cultures will keep for weeks. However if you are going to do this a lot, then it helps to keep an extra, known pure, culture.

C23148e16a4dd05351d1902a69097d65

(753)

on January 11, 2013
at 12:01 AM

Oh so no heating? I'll try this thanks!

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on January 11, 2013
at 07:48 PM

Villi is a type of yogurt that does not need to be heated. It also has a slightly different texture. Check out http://www.dyno-mom.com/p/viili-101.html for more info

Ba913e2cc77984c1b2079adfe3fd9f93

(128)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

@thhq That's exactly what happened to me, so now I use a known pure culture, which I reculture with ordinary supermarket milk. This is also what Cultures for Health recommends. You do not need a large amount, since you are not consuming this one.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on January 13, 2013
at 04:52 AM

I reculture with the yogurt I have made. This can work for many months, but usually something goes off - grainy texture or complete failure - and I have to restart.

2
3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on January 10, 2013
at 10:47 PM

I actually just heat (raw or not) to 110 and stir in my starter yogurt to ferment. Then end. Keep between 90-110 for ferment time.

C23148e16a4dd05351d1902a69097d65

(753)

on January 11, 2013
at 12:02 AM

So you heat to 110, let it cool, and then mix in the starter and make as usual? Also where do you keep it to keep it at that temperature?

3846a3b61bc9051e4baebdef62e58c52

(18635)

on January 11, 2013
at 01:31 PM

I use a cooler. I transfer to quart jars and put in a cooler wrapped in towels in the warmest area of the house for up to 24 hours.

1
Medium avatar

(10601)

on January 13, 2013
at 04:39 AM

I always scald my milk and cool it in the refrigerator before adding my culture. I think this is a sanitizing step to kill off competing or toxic bacteria such as E. coli. I think the culture would probably thrive in any lukewarm milk but I'm uneasy resorting to Paleolithic sanitation.

The old Salton yogurt maker I use came with a combination thermometer and dipper spoon.

1
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on January 11, 2013
at 03:50 PM

If you trust your source, raw is fine. But I don't trust any raw source except myself (and most folks don't raise their own dairy animals.)

1
4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on January 11, 2013
at 10:44 AM

I use the matsoni culture for yoghurt; it cultures at room temperature and is easy to use.

And kefir DOESNT need to be cultured every day. I often leave mine for two or three weeks when I go away. When I come back, I just strain it (metal sieve, metal spoon!) rinse the "grains" in tap water, put in clean jar and fill up with milk. By the next day, it has formed kefir. I actually find it to be very forgiving and long lived. I do like it best when it has been allowed to ferment (or whatever it is doing) for two days - more developed sort of flavour, and I can't help feeling that it must have a greater amount of bacteria etc in it!

I have never heated the milk up.....

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on January 12, 2013
at 08:51 AM

When I'm leaving the kefir for a few days / weeks, I do put it into the fridge. Matsoni yogurt doesn't need to have the milk heated and cultures at about 65 / 70° F. Very easy stuff!

C23148e16a4dd05351d1902a69097d65

(753)

on January 13, 2013
at 05:14 PM

whats the taste difference between matsoni and viili?

1
7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2040)

on January 11, 2013
at 03:40 AM

From what I understand at 118 degrees the enzymes and the beneficial bacteria in the milk will be destroyed. So as long as you keep it under that your okay, you'll still have all the wonderful stuff that you get when you consume the milk cold.

http://nourishedkitchen.com/raw-milk-yogurt/

http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/video-rawpasteurized-yogurt-differences/

1
Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

on January 10, 2013
at 11:54 PM

Sallie Fallon's recipe in Nourishing Traditions calls for only raising it to 110 degrees. I have done this and it works. I am curious to try it at room temp...that would be easier!

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on January 11, 2013
at 12:30 AM

I do sometimes...but I admit to being bit casual (like when I used to make bread with water temp)...you can kind of tell by how it feels when you stick your finger in.

089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on January 11, 2013
at 01:07 AM

i doubt room temp would work for most people unless you live in the amazon. i just had a yogurt bomb. tried it doing the oven method with the light on and it only stayed at 70 F. that's usually what a room tempurature is and my yogurt was milk consistency after 24 hrs.

C23148e16a4dd05351d1902a69097d65

(753)

on January 11, 2013
at 12:03 AM

that would be much easier haha! thanks. do you use a thermometer when heating it?

Medium avatar

(10601)

on January 13, 2013
at 01:31 PM

After an experience with a local dairyman smoking cigarettes while he was milking, and being on my great grandparent's filthy dairy farm, I'm more cautious.

Medium avatar

(10601)

on January 13, 2013
at 04:47 AM

It works until you get milk contaminated with feces....then Nourishing Traditions are replaced by traditional diarrhea and vomiting....

Ef32d6cc543a74319464e2100e5a9ffd

(1205)

on January 13, 2013
at 12:08 PM

You just need to find a source you trust. When my daughter was one, I started a raw milk coop in my town using a farm with just three cows nearby with weekly deliveries. She is now nine, and none of the many families in the coop have ever had a problem with the milk.

1
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on January 10, 2013
at 10:52 PM

Most of the vitamins in milk are pretty heat stable. You're going to destroy the enzymes, and possibly denature some proteins, but I wouldn't worry about it.

0
11d8f65279d78deff567cfb4ee9602f2

on July 25, 2013
at 12:59 AM

The reason most recommend you pasteurize the milk before making yogurt with a mesophillic culture is not because the culture needs warm milk to set. The pasteurization process is to kill off competing organisms of the introduced culture AND is said to help create a thicker yogurt due to some chemical structures breaking down during the process. ( not exactly sure about the thickening part )

This also helps maintain your pure culture for future batches. Even those who use raw milk to make yogurt keep their pure cultures in a "mother" with pasteurized milk. Not all but most. Raw milk already has the organisms it needs to create yogurt to some degree, whether it appeals to your palette or will set in ideal conditions is another thing. What using raw milk as a mother will do is corrupt your culture beyond anything recognizable as "Matsoni" or "Villi".

Mesophillic cultures set best around room temperature, this is why they are called mesophillic and not thermophillic.

0
65ebf38bfd2d97f7f19f07992be04674

on January 14, 2013
at 01:57 PM

Despite what raw milk sellers might say, heating milk to 160 is not going to alter the nutritional content much at all.

0
3491e51730101b18724dc57c86601173

(8395)

on January 13, 2013
at 05:11 PM

The frequency at which you make kefir depends on temperature. During summer I have to attend to my kefir daily. During the winter it's every other day or every two days. Some people maintain a slow, steady fermentation in the fridge.

Kefir takes very little work. Just strain the grains, return them to the same jar (I swap out for a clean jar weekly), then wash the strainer and spatula. Five minutes, tops.

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