3

votes

I want to start making my own yogurt

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 08, 2011 at 2:32 PM

So I've just found out that there are about 3 raw milk dairies around me that offer cow-shares since its (inanely) illegal to consume raw milk that you don't own.

WOW RAW MILK! I've never been a really big straight up milk drinker but I do like yogurt, and I'd like to go back to consuming it after my 30-day strict paleo adherance is over.

How would you suggest one begins in yogurt making? I know you can go the quick and easy route and get a yogurt maker (yay unitasker) or I've seen numerous methods involving your own containers and heating pads.

Which do you think is easier in the long run?

Is this even a good idea with lacto-paleo?

TL;DR: Should I make my own raw milk yogurt and how should I go about doing so?

UPDATE: I just found http://nourishedkitchen.com/raw-milk-yogurt/ <- this tutorial and it says I can just heat the milk slightly, pour it into a jar and put it in warm water IN MY CROCK POT?! Damn, that's the easiest. Please enlighten me if any of you have accomplished this and how it worked.

D5e3f40f7096d9761bd734f4d3ef9c30

(10)

on August 14, 2011
at 02:42 AM

Heating the milk before adding the culture is not to destroy bacteria but to denature the whey proteins so they will coagulate better, which enhances the thickness and texture. the process is called "scalding" and involves heating the milk to 140 degrees and holding it there for 10 minutes.Cool the milk down to approx. 108 degrees before adding your culture. Traditionally scalding was done to denature any enzymes that might cause seperation. Basically it is done to create a thicker yogurt. I know I do it and it works.

Medium avatar

(2169)

on August 13, 2011
at 06:47 PM

When I make yogurt in my crock pot, I wrap the pot with a towel or blanket to keep the heat in. works like a charm!

06f46afda9ee3ca7f0070a3caa294a91

(305)

on April 20, 2011
at 10:14 PM

sorry for the late response, it is the salton brand.

0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on April 10, 2011
at 01:12 PM

unless you have an INTENT to build bigger muscles, you have nothing to worry about, it won't happen. Raw milk is a wonderful food for health.

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 10, 2011
at 03:39 AM

Unfortunately I think our house is too cold - in Florida, the A/C would be on and we're in Michigan and our house is holding around 68-70 degrees right now.

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 10, 2011
at 03:38 AM

Also, did she put it in a sealed container?! It's supposed to be able to "burp" so to speak, so 100% sealed (as in a jar or something) would explain why it exploded.

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 10, 2011
at 03:37 AM

I'm a girl, so bigger is NOT what I'm aiming for.

B4ec9ce369e43ea83f06ee645169cee0

on April 09, 2011
at 02:08 AM

I've also used my oven... not turned on but with the light on. It works great and if it gets too warm you can just prop open the door.

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 08, 2011
at 06:32 PM

Unfortunately for me, my last large appliance purchase was a juicer :(

23cdea3bba94e17d2b58b525773d0c0a

(729)

on April 08, 2011
at 04:46 PM

I like the thinness(?), but I prefer to drink my yogurt or add to smoothies anyway. Anoterh option if you can't seem to get it to a desired thickness.

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on April 08, 2011
at 04:33 PM

It's never made ours unpalatable, but it seems a little thinner and less consistent in texture. It can be thickened by adding some gelatin, or by draining it a little. My wife says it's still great. I'm not much of a yogurt eater myself; to me it's an ingredient or a step on the way to cream cheese.

23cdea3bba94e17d2b58b525773d0c0a

(729)

on April 08, 2011
at 04:16 PM

I honestly believe a yogurt maker is a waste of money. If not a waste, there are certainly still better things you could spend your money on. For instance, if you don't already have a good dehydrator (like an exalibur), that would be a way better investment. I incubate my yogurt in my exalibur AND I can dehydrate fruits and veggies, make jerky, dry herbs, etc. You can't do that with a yogurt maker. Otherwise, the cooler method is pretty simple and effective or you could wrap in a towel and stick in your oven with the light on.

23cdea3bba94e17d2b58b525773d0c0a

(729)

on April 08, 2011
at 04:11 PM

One great thing about raw dairy, Oranges, is that it rarely ever goes "bad", it just becomes more easily digestable ;).

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 08, 2011
at 04:06 PM

Only kind of cooler I have is styrofoam :(

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 08, 2011
at 04:06 PM

If I'm getting raw milk I think I'll keep the stuff in it (at least at first, just to see). If it's totally unpalatable or goes bad too swiftly I'd process it a bit. I'd just buy the organic stuff otherwise (its Pasteurized).

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 08, 2011
at 04:04 PM

There are numerous ones available on amazon - any suggestions?

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:34 PM

A cooler should hold the heat much better than a crock pot. Another advantage of the cooler method is that if you decide you don't care for homemade yogurt, you haven't spent a bunch of money on equipment you no longer need. Everyone's got some kind of beer cooler, or at least a thermos.

95601768ec9cb75cc3a9cbcd2271ed14

(2206)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:34 PM

totally. this is a good basic recipe. you obviously don't have to add the sweetener or thickeners if you don't want to, although with coconut milk i have added gelatin with good effect. http://www.smallfootprintfamily.com/2009/04/25/homemade-coconut-milk-yogurt/

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:33 PM

I think the crockpot will work just fine. I used to make yogurt with neither and it turned out fine. That said, Amanda's got some great tips in this answer. :)

95601768ec9cb75cc3a9cbcd2271ed14

(2206)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:32 PM

yep. http://www.smallfootprintfamily.com/2009/04/25/homemade-coconut-milk-yogurt/

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:17 PM

You think instead of a cooler I could use my crockpot (not on of course)?

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:10 PM

According to comments on that article I posted in the update, you can use a particular yogurt as a starter and it will sort of "inherit" its features, but depending on the milk may not be exactly the same. You're never going to be able to totally replicate the techniques that they use but with work maybe you can come close. I wouldn't dump the entire tub in there though, I think you only need a tablespoon or so.

20da74d4abfdbb13b66d6d4e0db1b59b

(195)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:09 PM

This. Absolutely. I tried several methods, too, including the old yogurt maker my mom used when I was a kid, and the best so far has been the cooler method. Partly, I think the house is just too cool in the winter to use the light in the oven or the top of the fridge. I've also experimented using packaged starters, but I prefer to just take a scoop of my Astro Balkan style yogurt and mix it in.

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:08 PM

AWESOME! That would REALLY teach my cats to get off the counter!

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:06 PM

thats super helpful, thanks!

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11 Answers

best answer

8
95601768ec9cb75cc3a9cbcd2271ed14

(2206)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:02 PM

I make homemade raw yogurt pretty regularly using this cooler method. It has worked well consistently. A few things I've learned over time:

-Smaller jars makes thicker yogurt than bigger jars.

-Milk that is a few days old works way better than straight-out-da-cow.

-Adding more starting culture than recommended results in runnier yogurt.

-If you like thicker yogurt you can let the whey drain out through cheesecloth for a few hours. Save the whey to drink or to use to lacto-ferment veggies.

-The yogurt gets tangier tasting the longer it is in the fridge, but I've never had any go sour--seriously, I found a several month old half-eaten jar I forgot about in the back of the fridge once and it was super tasty.

-Getting an edible product is dummy-proof, but there are so many variables (temperature, the fat content of the milk/breed of the cow, time of year, etc.) that you can't expect to replicate the exact same product (or your favorite store bought yogurt) every time. Texture and taste will change over time.

Good luck! I was pretty discouraged the first time I made yogurt since it came out really clumpy, but I've refined my technique over time.

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:17 PM

You think instead of a cooler I could use my crockpot (not on of course)?

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 08, 2011
at 04:06 PM

Only kind of cooler I have is styrofoam :(

B4ec9ce369e43ea83f06ee645169cee0

on April 09, 2011
at 02:08 AM

I've also used my oven... not turned on but with the light on. It works great and if it gets too warm you can just prop open the door.

A89f9751a97c3082802dc0bcbe4e9208

(13978)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:33 PM

I think the crockpot will work just fine. I used to make yogurt with neither and it turned out fine. That said, Amanda's got some great tips in this answer. :)

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:34 PM

A cooler should hold the heat much better than a crock pot. Another advantage of the cooler method is that if you decide you don't care for homemade yogurt, you haven't spent a bunch of money on equipment you no longer need. Everyone's got some kind of beer cooler, or at least a thermos.

20da74d4abfdbb13b66d6d4e0db1b59b

(195)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:09 PM

This. Absolutely. I tried several methods, too, including the old yogurt maker my mom used when I was a kid, and the best so far has been the cooler method. Partly, I think the house is just too cool in the winter to use the light in the oven or the top of the fridge. I've also experimented using packaged starters, but I prefer to just take a scoop of my Astro Balkan style yogurt and mix it in.

Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:06 PM

thats super helpful, thanks!

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 10, 2011
at 03:39 AM

Unfortunately I think our house is too cold - in Florida, the A/C would be on and we're in Michigan and our house is holding around 68-70 degrees right now.

Medium avatar

(2169)

on August 13, 2011
at 06:47 PM

When I make yogurt in my crock pot, I wrap the pot with a towel or blanket to keep the heat in. works like a charm!

2
03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:41 PM

One thing to add to the other good answers: If you're working with raw milk, it will have active cultures of its own that may interfere or combine with the yogurt cultures in unexpected ways. In my experience, this leads to greater variation in thickness and lumpiness. If you're okay with that, just heat it up to yogurt-making temps (about 100-110) and get the benefits of all those cultures.

But if you want a smoother product like the yogurt in the store, or if you want to duplicate your starter yogurt as closely as possible, you can pasteurize your milk first to kill the cultures that come with it. You can pasteurize at a milder temperature at home than the processors use (I think 140 degrees for 30 minutes will do it, but double check). Just make sure you cool it back down to about 110 degrees before adding the yogurt starter, or you'll kill its cultures too.

23cdea3bba94e17d2b58b525773d0c0a

(729)

on April 08, 2011
at 04:11 PM

One great thing about raw dairy, Oranges, is that it rarely ever goes "bad", it just becomes more easily digestable ;).

23cdea3bba94e17d2b58b525773d0c0a

(729)

on April 08, 2011
at 04:46 PM

I like the thinness(?), but I prefer to drink my yogurt or add to smoothies anyway. Anoterh option if you can't seem to get it to a desired thickness.

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 08, 2011
at 04:06 PM

If I'm getting raw milk I think I'll keep the stuff in it (at least at first, just to see). If it's totally unpalatable or goes bad too swiftly I'd process it a bit. I'd just buy the organic stuff otherwise (its Pasteurized).

03fa485bfd54734522755f47a5e6597e

(3944)

on April 08, 2011
at 04:33 PM

It's never made ours unpalatable, but it seems a little thinner and less consistent in texture. It can be thickened by adding some gelatin, or by draining it a little. My wife says it's still great. I'm not much of a yogurt eater myself; to me it's an ingredient or a step on the way to cream cheese.

D5e3f40f7096d9761bd734f4d3ef9c30

(10)

on August 14, 2011
at 02:42 AM

Heating the milk before adding the culture is not to destroy bacteria but to denature the whey proteins so they will coagulate better, which enhances the thickness and texture. the process is called "scalding" and involves heating the milk to 140 degrees and holding it there for 10 minutes.Cool the milk down to approx. 108 degrees before adding your culture. Traditionally scalding was done to denature any enzymes that might cause seperation. Basically it is done to create a thicker yogurt. I know I do it and it works.

1
23cdea3bba94e17d2b58b525773d0c0a

(729)

on April 08, 2011
at 04:48 PM

Something else to think about is making kefir. If you can get ahold of kefir grains from someone, you just put the grains and milk in a jar and leave it on the counter for a day or two. It's more drinkable than spoonable but it's an easy, excellent cultured product with more diverse strains of bacteria and yeasts.

0
3fe2bf1367970868757ddf7ed7c62531

(817)

on August 13, 2011
at 04:56 PM

I make mine in the stove. I take a liter of milk and heat it up to just before it boils. THen i let it cool till i can put my finger in it - wash your hands first.. you are dealing with growing a bacteria culture.. you want a good one! Once cooled I put it in a large jar, mix in one large spoon of yogurt from a previous batch and place it in the over. I keep the oven on the lowest setting and leave it for 8 to 12 hours. You want the temp to stay around 80C/176F the whole time. (Sometimes i leave the oven of for 4 hours. Then turn it off, go to bed and wake up to wonderful yogurt!)

There is just no need to buy another single use gadget when you have a stove and a jar/pie dish/casserole dish ect. Good luck!

0
427c8cbb9c2492d74b887fc5cf7a8ce0

on August 13, 2011
at 05:53 AM

When I had dairy (before I learned I was allergic to casein), I used to get various yogurt cultures from "Nick's Natural Nook" (on ebay). These cultures are ancient strains and don't require a yogurt maker so you can just male yogurt on your counter (I especially liked the matsoni and the filmjolk). They also have kefir grains.

0
0e395acc856e3353f3f5892e6b09b0e7

(1227)

on April 09, 2011
at 01:35 PM

For the last six months my husband has been making yoghurt with Cream! It is incredibily delicious. We buy organic cream without carrageenan and use a starter called Yogourmet from Quebec that we order from www.yogourmet.com It tastes great plain, but I eat it with berries most often.

0
0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on April 09, 2011
at 12:30 AM

Raw milk is a complete LIVING FOOD - if you strength train and will make you bigger. I drink raw milk in my training binges a few times a years. I do enjoy good raw milk cheeses as some limited diary is my 20 percent Raw milk works for me.

0fb8b3d6dcfb279b0f7e050d2d22510f

(4645)

on April 10, 2011
at 01:12 PM

unless you have an INTENT to build bigger muscles, you have nothing to worry about, it won't happen. Raw milk is a wonderful food for health.

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 10, 2011
at 03:37 AM

I'm a girl, so bigger is NOT what I'm aiming for.

0
51691d78e11ef532374f0205d0069f96

(35)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:29 PM

Could I make it using coconut milk? I have Celiac and stay away from all dairy. The coconut milk yogurt in the store has sugar, rice starch, etc. in it that I don't want to eat.

95601768ec9cb75cc3a9cbcd2271ed14

(2206)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:34 PM

totally. this is a good basic recipe. you obviously don't have to add the sweetener or thickeners if you don't want to, although with coconut milk i have added gelatin with good effect. http://www.smallfootprintfamily.com/2009/04/25/homemade-coconut-milk-yogurt/

95601768ec9cb75cc3a9cbcd2271ed14

(2206)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:32 PM

yep. http://www.smallfootprintfamily.com/2009/04/25/homemade-coconut-milk-yogurt/

0
06f46afda9ee3ca7f0070a3caa294a91

on April 08, 2011
at 03:24 PM

i havent used it, but i heard the yogurt maker on amazon is amazing. will have to buy it myself soon.

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 08, 2011
at 04:04 PM

There are numerous ones available on amazon - any suggestions?

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 08, 2011
at 06:32 PM

Unfortunately for me, my last large appliance purchase was a juicer :(

23cdea3bba94e17d2b58b525773d0c0a

(729)

on April 08, 2011
at 04:16 PM

I honestly believe a yogurt maker is a waste of money. If not a waste, there are certainly still better things you could spend your money on. For instance, if you don't already have a good dehydrator (like an exalibur), that would be a way better investment. I incubate my yogurt in my exalibur AND I can dehydrate fruits and veggies, make jerky, dry herbs, etc. You can't do that with a yogurt maker. Otherwise, the cooler method is pretty simple and effective or you could wrap in a towel and stick in your oven with the light on.

06f46afda9ee3ca7f0070a3caa294a91

(305)

on April 20, 2011
at 10:14 PM

sorry for the late response, it is the salton brand.

0
Cc2a43461ec5b2b7ba5d55215ea0f068

on April 08, 2011
at 02:47 PM

There is a way to do this and I know it involves using a scoop of live culture yogurt in whole, raw milk and putting it in a container on the counter for a few days. I've never done it myself, but my sister has - and one night it exploded. So, be careful.

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:08 PM

AWESOME! That would REALLY teach my cats to get off the counter!

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 10, 2011
at 03:38 AM

Also, did she put it in a sealed container?! It's supposed to be able to "burp" so to speak, so 100% sealed (as in a jar or something) would explain why it exploded.

0
Medium avatar

(5136)

on April 08, 2011
at 02:42 PM

I've been curious about this because I was to specifically make yogurt that tastes like a particular brand. I want it to taste like Erivan (my all time favorite yogurt, really sour, which I cant buy where I live now- booo). I was wondering if I used that basic method you describe and put in a tub of Erivan if the bacteria and flavor would "catch" to the rest of the milk and the yogurts would taste similar. Would I then have a sort of "mother yogurt" I could re-use to make similar stuff. I have a secret source of raw grass fed milk and I miss my yogurt. Anyone know?

9aa2a816c61170cc0183a68be0386ba5

(1702)

on April 08, 2011
at 03:10 PM

According to comments on that article I posted in the update, you can use a particular yogurt as a starter and it will sort of "inherit" its features, but depending on the milk may not be exactly the same. You're never going to be able to totally replicate the techniques that they use but with work maybe you can come close. I wouldn't dump the entire tub in there though, I think you only need a tablespoon or so.

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