5

votes

Have I made myself slightly lactose intolerant?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 20, 2011 at 11:06 AM

I did the whole 30 about and finished about a month ago. Since then I have added a little bit of dairy back, but I notice if I have milk or yogurt it slightly upsets my stomach. Not like I need the toilet or am going to be sick, just discomfort. I used to have tonnes of dairy with no issues at all.

Has anyone else had the same issue? Did it go away? Should I fight through it (that sounds stupid, but I love a cappuchino every now and again)?

I dont seem to have an issue with cheese. Why is that?

Cheers all

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on April 13, 2013
at 12:59 PM

As Ed mentioned earlier, it's more the fact that I have stopped producing the enzymes to breakdown the milk. Under normal circumstances I have absolutely no issues with dairy. I also like milk and cheese.

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on January 18, 2012
at 08:05 AM

Interesting, cheers Jim

8d454fc50d6d58643d6f8b0d1e7ea8ea

(2830)

on August 20, 2011
at 06:24 PM

Would those be good beasties or bad beasties?

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on August 20, 2011
at 05:38 PM

Good answer! I'd add to it that gut flora also adapt to lactose meaning that the presence of lactose consistently in the diet will favor little beasties that like lactose.

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on August 20, 2011
at 01:55 PM

Cheers Kelly. I didn't mention in the question, but I don't seem to have a problem with butter.

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9 Answers

best answer

11
6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11488)

on August 20, 2011
at 05:34 PM

@peter,

The answer to your question is that lactase (the enzyme in your intestines that digests lactose) is an inducible enzyme.

Enzymes are proteins, which are metabolically expensive to produce. It makes evolutionary sense that your body makes less digestive enzymes such as lactase and sucrase when they're not needed. If your diet changes, your body can gradually increase the production of some enzymes through a process of enzyme induction.

For example, the production of lactase enzyme can be increased in some lactose-intolerant individuals by feeding them lactose. Also, studies in rats have shown that other carbohydrate-digesting enzymes, such as sucrase-isomaltase, trehalase, and maltase-glucoamylase--can be induced by hydrocortisone administration.

So yes, by cutting dairy you can make yourself relatively lactose-intolerant, but you should be able to gradually re-introduce some dairy products into your diet.

D10ca8d11301c2f4993ac2279ce4b930

(5242)

on August 20, 2011
at 05:38 PM

Good answer! I'd add to it that gut flora also adapt to lactose meaning that the presence of lactose consistently in the diet will favor little beasties that like lactose.

8d454fc50d6d58643d6f8b0d1e7ea8ea

(2830)

on August 20, 2011
at 06:24 PM

Would those be good beasties or bad beasties?

3
345c1755efe005edd162b770dc6fb821

(8767)

on August 20, 2011
at 01:13 PM

Dairy seems to be one of those things that you have to add back in slowly. I'd try using ghee instead of butter first, then if after a week of increasing the amount all is ok, try the yogurt.

Strain the full fat yogurt (to remove the whey) and see if that helps!

You might have had some issues before but never noticed it because your gut was use to it; seems removing it for 30 days gave it a chance to fix itself and now its fighting back!!

good luck! take it slow!!

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on August 20, 2011
at 01:55 PM

Cheers Kelly. I didn't mention in the question, but I don't seem to have a problem with butter.

2
A485ec0b4d2a3dae35994404a843f677

on January 18, 2012
at 06:18 AM

On the subject of unfermented milk for Northern Europeans who potentially have lactase persistence into adulthood, I have frequently noticed that if I stop drinking a significant amount of milk, I become lactose intolerant and this lactose intolerance is not reduced by starting to drink milk again. However, if I use lactase-treated milk for a few weeks, my lactose tolerance returns perfectly. This suggests that the intestines only synthesize lactase in response to galactose absorption, so that eliminating milk and then reintroducing it as an experiment is bound to fail much of the time because there is so little free galactose in the rest of the diet.

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on January 18, 2012
at 08:05 AM

Interesting, cheers Jim

1
08db72ae00edfb3c0b93df8a467cb201

(10)

on April 11, 2013
at 07:58 AM

In some people the lactase-producing cells in the small intestine will not "atrophy" or diminish if they are not regularly stimulated by the presence of lactose. First of all, your body either makes the lactase enzyme for life or it gradually diminishes production with age. Nothing you eat or don't eat really affects this in any way. (However disease, drugs or damage to the small intestine can also stop production, either temporarily or permanently, but that's a relatively tiny number of cases).

Food intolerances never change. They are based on a lacking of a particular enzyme or catalyst. I find that people can start to tell that they have an intolerance once they do cut out the food completely.You might have some symptoms, though not necessarily G.I. related, that you don't identify until you cut out the source of the problem.

Also cheeses made from milk, goat or cow,will have a reduction in the amount of lactose due to the fermentation process. Cheese is relatively low in lactose in that way and generally speaking, the older the cheese, the less lactose it has. That is why you can tolerate cheese so well.

1
2ab6415f5f20b8fe1d34a94c7be85e6a

on August 20, 2011
at 07:16 PM

Try raw dairy to get the lactase and incorporate slowly back in if you want to consume it in this order-Ghee, Butter, Heavy cream, Yogurt/kefir, cheese and finally full fat milk.

1
3fa1da906c426b335569644f8a908024

on August 20, 2011
at 04:17 PM

Sounds like lactose is your issue. Cheese and other high fat dairy products have less of the milk sugar, lactose. Many people walk around with food intolerances all their lives eating their offending foods with no issue because of the constant exposure.

Eliminating a food and reintroducing it is the best way to determine a sensitivity/intolerance. Food allergy research is moving in the direction of desensitization under very carefully monitored clinical trials (not to be experimented even in a regular dr's office for those w/severe allergies). Basically the same principle at work, though, on a much lower level with your lactose intolerance. So, while dairy probably isn't the best for you, and has a lot of other negative effects - source of sugar, creates mucus, slows weight loss, and doesn't offer much nutritional benefit (unless it's raw) - you could keep it around in moderation to ward off the stomach discomfort and enjoy the occasional cappuccino. Maybe have them make it breve, using half and half, that way you still enjoy your treat and you're eating less lactose, and more fat! YUM!

1
Ec7cb2a7a68655954a01f03e95be1383

on August 20, 2011
at 12:35 PM

After 6 months without dairy I ate 500 g cream and 100 g butter this morning. Wow, I am feeling miserable, tired; having brain fog, bloating and slight cramps. I will go definitely without any dairy.

Sorry, I can't answer your question, only share my experience.

Lol the worst part is the brain fog. It's a kinda spacey feeling, like walking in a dream. Definitly bad way of life if I ever want to think clear again.

1
8d454fc50d6d58643d6f8b0d1e7ea8ea

on August 20, 2011
at 12:12 PM

I don't have a real answer - but I've noticed the same thing with yogurt (haven't tried straight milk). Ice cream, cheese and butter don't seem to affect me. I get a little bloated in the gut and feel kind of PMS-crampy (sorry if you can't relate to that one exactly :)) Also, some yogurt makes my throat burn. Like you said, nothing terrible, but def. noticeable.

0
054aac13225d158424ae8de2ee67afd0

on March 14, 2013
at 01:44 PM

If you are feeling bad with dairy, why not skip it? Isn't your body telling you what it doesn't want? Wasn't that a huge goal of the Whole30 - to know what your body tolerates and doesn't? There are other ways to get the nutrition you are getting from dairy products.

6b8d12fc3e43179f9ae1765a4d1a9dc2

(5914)

on April 13, 2013
at 12:59 PM

As Ed mentioned earlier, it's more the fact that I have stopped producing the enzymes to breakdown the milk. Under normal circumstances I have absolutely no issues with dairy. I also like milk and cheese.

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