1

votes

Bulgarian Dairy?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 13, 2011 at 5:03 AM

I found something called Bulgarian Cultured Yogurt and Bulgarian Cultured Buttermilk at Sunflower Farmers Market. Does anyone know how this stuff compares to Kefir, Greek Yogurt, Etc? Does it belong in a primal spectrum?

EDIT: I went back to Sunflower and bought a bottle. I decided to post the link to the product, but thought it was a little ironic that the girl is standing in a wheat field. Hmmm... I thought I had a great find, now I wonder.

http://www.whitemountainfoods.com/

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 20, 2012
at 03:59 PM

I actually make 2 cups at a time (or more) but that's the ratio I use. I have a yolife so I can use larger jars--don't like tiny ones--and I usually let it go 8 hrs for 2 cups and a little longer for a quart.

E9808a9cfe806a22c0bdaff7c010c659

(405)

on January 20, 2012
at 10:38 AM

So you make a mixture with 3/4 of a cup of whole milk and 1/4 of a cup of cream ? Do you use a yoghurt maker or ? Length and temp ? Thanks !

E9808a9cfe806a22c0bdaff7c010c659

(405)

on January 20, 2012
at 10:36 AM

Late but still. Greek yoghurt differs from regular yoghurt in fat content which is usually 10 or 11g per 100 as apposed to 3grams in "normal" yoghurt. This Bulgarian one might have some different bacteria cultures but that's about it.

E9808a9cfe806a22c0bdaff7c010c659

(405)

on January 20, 2012
at 10:30 AM

Regular yoghurt that might have a bit more diverse bacteria profile. Nutritional profile is Greek Yoghurt is superior imo (more fat) and so it the bacterial profile of a DIY kefir.

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

1
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 08, 2011
at 04:01 PM

Making yogurt at home is one of my new hobbies. As I understand it, Bulgarian yogurt is like a "breed" of yogurt since cultures that originated in different areas have differences in taste, thickness, etc. Greek and Bulgarian are the Ford and Toyota of yogurt.

I'm making my second batch today. When I bought the culture, I looked for one with more than 2 species of bacteria although there are 2 that are considered the definitive ones.

For the first batch I used mostly whole milk with less than 1/4 cream. In my mind that was "really" whole milk since milk seems thinner today than I remember from the past. I found the flavor pleasant without any sweetener although I added some fresh fruit and some of my water kefir grains (taste sweet but as I understand it they're not that digestible.) The consistency of that batch was very smooth, about as firm as nice whipped cream.

Today's batch will be half milk and half cream and the third will be 100% cream to see how the consistency/flavor varies.

UPDATE: After testing, I found the smoothest, creamiest yogurt is a 3:1 ratio. For each 3/4 c of whole milk, I add 1/4 c. heavy cream. My favorite thing about making yogurt is that it still tastes like a dairy product--rather than thickeners, texturizers and preservatives.

E9808a9cfe806a22c0bdaff7c010c659

(405)

on January 20, 2012
at 10:36 AM

Late but still. Greek yoghurt differs from regular yoghurt in fat content which is usually 10 or 11g per 100 as apposed to 3grams in "normal" yoghurt. This Bulgarian one might have some different bacteria cultures but that's about it.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 20, 2012
at 03:59 PM

I actually make 2 cups at a time (or more) but that's the ratio I use. I have a yolife so I can use larger jars--don't like tiny ones--and I usually let it go 8 hrs for 2 cups and a little longer for a quart.

E9808a9cfe806a22c0bdaff7c010c659

(405)

on January 20, 2012
at 10:38 AM

So you make a mixture with 3/4 of a cup of whole milk and 1/4 of a cup of cream ? Do you use a yoghurt maker or ? Length and temp ? Thanks !

0
D7b01bbfd0b91a12c4aea43fb20adf15

on November 13, 2011
at 05:01 PM

It should be very similar to Greek Yogurt, different from Kefir. It should contain live probiotic bacteria, but that depends on many factors. Have no idea what cultured buttermilk is, but my guess is its plain milk. I would recommend the Yogurt as the better choice, definitely better than most milk products.

0
0e395acc856e3353f3f5892e6b09b0e7

(1227)

on November 13, 2011
at 03:13 PM

My understanding is that traditional Bulgarian yoghurt is made with cream. Check the label. My husband makes a batch of yoghurt from cream every week. It is delicious. I got the idea of trying making yoghurt this way from Peter at Hyperlipid.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!