1

votes

How do I get back on track after recovering from an injury?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 20, 2012 at 3:10 PM

I screwed up my wrist last summer with a dropped deadlift I tried to foolishly hold on to. It's taken a long time to recover, and I also started experiencing all sorts of other problems with my knees, neck, back, repetitive stress in my other arm, and TMJD. I'd start to recover from one thing and another issue would show up. Husband is an almost-doctor (one more year!), and very well-versed in musculoskeletal issues and decided that, as far as I understand, sitting on my bum all day doing work for school with no workout, stretching, movement, etc. was causing a cascade effect. I had a spinal fusion when I was 14 (26 now) and whenever I have "stopped moving" I start getting various, severe aches and pains. I'm like a shark or something.

Anyway, I have finally recovered enough after a year of this to maybe start with something like kettlebell swings or light weights, but damn if I don't feel so weak! How do I deal mentally with such a reduction in strength and endurance? My diet is on point, and I feel great - I know that I'll see even better results paired with exercise...but I am embarrassed - even by myself, in our home gym. How have some of you dealt with being back at squares one, two, or three after being at square ten?

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on April 27, 2012
at 08:22 PM

True, true... :-)

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on April 26, 2012
at 08:14 AM

Oh I know. But the upside is you ARE young, and you will recover fully over time if you don't do anything stupid getting back into it! For what it's worth, I'm pretty old, but I still feel young. THat doesn't go away!

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:51 AM

Thank you for the concern, but I did say that I am recovered enough to begin workouts. My husband is about to start a residency in pm&r and is excellent with omm, so I'm in good hands! I was asking for advice for the mental game of starting several steps behind where I left off.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:48 AM

Got to remember number three. I should make a poster for my basement gym because I am terrible about ringing bells that I shouldn't have, lol.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:47 AM

Thank you! I do need to watch myself...I have a bad habit of doing too much too soon.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:46 AM

I have heard variations of this mantra before, but it had slipped my mind. Thank you so much. An important thing to remember for sure.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:45 AM

Thank you for the advice...acceptance would be good. It's just difficult because I feel so young, and it was a relatively short time ago. Sigh!

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on April 20, 2012
at 04:06 PM

+1 on forgetting about square 10 days of glory.

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5 Answers

3
870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on April 20, 2012
at 04:05 PM

In the immortal words of my personal trainer: "You have to leave your ego at the door when you walk in the gym." I literally repeat that to myself when I walk in the door of the gym!

A good working philosophy no matter what your current level of conditioning. You can only be where you are.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:46 AM

I have heard variations of this mantra before, but it had slipped my mind. Thank you so much. An important thing to remember for sure.

3
Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on April 20, 2012
at 03:47 PM

Been there, done that. I was a 37-minute 10k runner until I had kids. After the birth of my second, I gave myself a nasty case of pneumonia trying to push my fitness back to where it had been. Since then I have come to peace with my identity as a mom and a person and not a fast runner, but it did take quite some time and various phases of over and undertraining with accompanying injuries.

So all I can say is be careful. Your best bet is to try and forget that you were ever at square 10. If you compare, you're going to re-injure yourself because you're going to be in such a hurry to get back to where you were. Have you considered wearing a disguise, so you won't worry about what other people think so much? Think of it this way, there are tons of people who come in at square one, and with careful, diligent work build their way up. Afterward, you will be so much more empathetic with them.

I'd also counsel gentle yoga, bodyweight exercises and plenty of walking. IMO strength and stamina are a little overrated. Breathing, being outside and just moving your body around for fun are important, too.

870fdea50f2a9f1cd2890c8e22549300

(2056)

on April 20, 2012
at 04:06 PM

+1 on forgetting about square 10 days of glory.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:45 AM

Thank you for the advice...acceptance would be good. It's just difficult because I feel so young, and it was a relatively short time ago. Sigh!

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on April 26, 2012
at 08:14 AM

Oh I know. But the upside is you ARE young, and you will recover fully over time if you don't do anything stupid getting back into it! For what it's worth, I'm pretty old, but I still feel young. THat doesn't go away!

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on April 27, 2012
at 08:22 PM

True, true... :-)

1
0266737ea1782946902fd3f8e60fa0b9

(2504)

on April 20, 2012
at 10:30 PM

As an injury prone old lady, I've got some ideas.

1) swimming is a great way to keep everything loose. Tightness is your enemy. Gentle swimming or even pool running is a good activity when other activities are not going so well. You might even do it in between other workouts.

2) Check out mobility wods (from kelly starrett)--do some mobility work as often as you can.

3) Come back waaaaay easier than you think you should. You can always add more later, but if you go too hard to soon, you can't unring that bell.

4) Work with a smart coach/trainer, even just a few sessions can help you evaluate if you're doing things that are not good for your body, and they can also give you things to work on as you're coming back.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:48 AM

Got to remember number three. I should make a poster for my basement gym because I am terrible about ringing bells that I shouldn't have, lol.

1
F0a3e3f17d9a740810ac37ff2353a9f3

(3804)

on April 20, 2012
at 09:25 PM

At 26, you'll be back to your pre-injury level of fitness pretty quickly.

In the meantime, focus on the advances you make rather than comparing the present to the past.

Most importantly, don't let embarassment/frustration turn into impatience and overtrain or re-injure yourself.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:47 AM

Thank you! I do need to watch myself...I have a bad habit of doing too much too soon.

0
F524eaa9d58e5cd2d2368ff7bfffda9c

(480)

on April 20, 2012
at 11:30 PM

Before you follow anyone's advice regarding yoga, mobility work, how to lift, what to lift, see a physical therapist or chiropractor.

You would be nuts to take these peoples advice with such severe problems before consulting with someones who's profession is to help you with these specific issues.

1296f5fecd084f101d7c5fbe013f07eb

(1213)

on April 26, 2012
at 02:51 AM

Thank you for the concern, but I did say that I am recovered enough to begin workouts. My husband is about to start a residency in pm&r and is excellent with omm, so I'm in good hands! I was asking for advice for the mental game of starting several steps behind where I left off.

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