0

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Hack my workout schedule. Injury prone.

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 08, 2013 at 8:47 PM

Hey guys, I've been injured for years in multiple areas of my body, but finally have made strides this past year in terms of recovery and strength. Summer's coming up and I have access to my old high school's weight-room. Here's my workout schedule I planned.

Monday

Bodyweight and pistol squats, overhead presses, pullups, and planks.

Wednesday

Sumo deadlifts, pushups, rows, and planks.

Friday

Kettlebell swings, unilateral farmer's carries, sprints, and rolling-plank drills.

I'll be walking and doing mobility work everyday, and performing activation and assistance exercises for the respective days (rotator cuff stuff, VMO, etc.)

The volume/reps will be on the lower side, and the weight/intensity will be on the moderate or higher side. A lot of this work will start out practicing technique, hence the lower volume. For example, I'll do 3x5 reps for the overhead press, and gradually add weight. Or, I'll do dead-hangs for 3x5 seconds, increase time and sets, then eventually do negatives, increase time and sets, and then eventually do pullups.

What do you guys think? My goal is to build some strength, minimize my chance of injury, and not surpass my body's threshold for repair.

EDIT: What rep/set scheme should maximize connective tissue growth?

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 09, 2013
at 06:21 PM

And if you're too poor to buy the book (not trying to be derogatory at all) then just youtube doug mcguff and watch some of his stuff, you'll get the gist of it. In his book though he talks about how this technique can be used especially in the elderly and injured populations, which is why I recommend it.

8d386bf2c5ba20fcc1a2a0c805b217c9

(743)

on May 09, 2013
at 06:02 PM

I'll check it out, thanks.

2edfcc5c8044bbb4f22ba6ea4289f592

(1398)

on May 09, 2013
at 12:10 AM

All the more reason to do them frequently. How will you get better at something if you don't work at it? Working hard to progress your push ups and pull ups will greaty benefit your health, athleticism, and body composition. Fair enough on your thinking with the sumo, but I urge you to experiment with the squat and find a way to progress your strength in that movement. I think it would be beneficial to work on your pull ups and push ups every day. Yes, every day. Even if you are just hanging from the bar or holding the push up position, work on progressing them in small increments each time.

8d386bf2c5ba20fcc1a2a0c805b217c9

(743)

on May 08, 2013
at 11:07 PM

Thanks for the input. Yeah, I wanted to do conventional deadlifts and low-bar back squats, but I'm a bit wary because of my messed up joints. I figured the sumo would take some force off of my posterior chain and put it onto my quads and groin, kinda of "combining" the squat and deadlift. The reason why I'm limiting the number of times I do the bodyweight exercises is because I'm pretty darn weak. I'm JUST starting to do full pushups again, and can only hang on the pullup bar. So, those exercises are pretty taxing at this point.

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2 Answers

2
2edfcc5c8044bbb4f22ba6ea4289f592

(1398)

on May 08, 2013
at 10:51 PM

Looks pretty solid, other than the absence of SQUATZ. The kind with a heavy bar on your back. Looks ok though. Since you are working out only 3 times a week I don't see any reason not to do pullups, bodyweight squats, pushups, and/or dips every time.

8d386bf2c5ba20fcc1a2a0c805b217c9

(743)

on May 08, 2013
at 11:07 PM

Thanks for the input. Yeah, I wanted to do conventional deadlifts and low-bar back squats, but I'm a bit wary because of my messed up joints. I figured the sumo would take some force off of my posterior chain and put it onto my quads and groin, kinda of "combining" the squat and deadlift. The reason why I'm limiting the number of times I do the bodyweight exercises is because I'm pretty darn weak. I'm JUST starting to do full pushups again, and can only hang on the pullup bar. So, those exercises are pretty taxing at this point.

2edfcc5c8044bbb4f22ba6ea4289f592

(1398)

on May 09, 2013
at 12:10 AM

All the more reason to do them frequently. How will you get better at something if you don't work at it? Working hard to progress your push ups and pull ups will greaty benefit your health, athleticism, and body composition. Fair enough on your thinking with the sumo, but I urge you to experiment with the squat and find a way to progress your strength in that movement. I think it would be beneficial to work on your pull ups and push ups every day. Yes, every day. Even if you are just hanging from the bar or holding the push up position, work on progressing them in small increments each time.

0
Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 09, 2013
at 03:20 AM

If you're injury Prone I HIGHLY recommend body by science by Doug mcguff.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on May 09, 2013
at 06:21 PM

And if you're too poor to buy the book (not trying to be derogatory at all) then just youtube doug mcguff and watch some of his stuff, you'll get the gist of it. In his book though he talks about how this technique can be used especially in the elderly and injured populations, which is why I recommend it.

8d386bf2c5ba20fcc1a2a0c805b217c9

(743)

on May 09, 2013
at 06:02 PM

I'll check it out, thanks.

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