5

votes

Any fine-haired ladies do the no-poo method?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 07, 2011 at 2:50 AM

I'm wondering if no-poo is best for thick and/or curly hair. Is there anyone with fine hair who has made it work for them? When I try it, my hair is thin and stringy so I give up after 4 or so days. Is this something I need to wait out or is it really just not good for fine, thin hair?

Db4ad76f6f307a6f577e175710049172

(2297)

on December 29, 2011
at 10:53 AM

sundownv has got it - brush downwards starting around the tips, and progressively make your strokes longer as you brush. Going no 'poo has helped tangling and stuff a lot, as when my hair is rather oily, I don't have as much problems with tangling.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on December 28, 2011
at 05:55 PM

I think he means to start at the ends to minimize the amount of tangles you're pulling downwards, stressing the hair. You progressively move up as you detangle. This is how I was taught when I was still a long fine blond haired child.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 28, 2011
at 04:18 PM

I'm confused--how do you brush from the tips up? That "teases" or fluffs the hair and it was the fashion in the 70s but as I recall it caused more breakage rather than less.

F2eb9c945a9afb8dfe06e6ea99fcb34b

(213)

on December 07, 2011
at 01:37 AM

It's just flat, stringy and greasy on top near the scalp and a dry haystack at the ends.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 02, 2011
at 02:40 AM

Try coconut oil- rinse it out if you want.

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on December 02, 2011
at 02:28 AM

Eedlewee, what does the no-poo method do to your hair? For example, does it get tangled, does it look or feel greasy, does it clump up? Knowing the problem may help us diagnose how to fix it.

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on October 07, 2011
at 07:16 PM

Eedlewee- Basically, I ran out of ACV, and I'd read of other people using various types of vinegar, so I tried it. Actually, I was going to try the red wine vinegar, but I couldn't find it (I never use it, so I buried it in the back of a high cupboard). It worked better and it's cheaper, so I keep using it. Some people do better with other vinegars, though- so I recommend just trying them until you find the right one. It's soooo much better than conditioner used to be, but it does smell a bit when my hair gets wet.

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on October 07, 2011
at 07:14 PM

Lauren- I do too. Actually, I keep the watered vinegar in a condiment bottle in the shower, and I do the same thing with the baking soda- so much easier than trying to scrub the powder into my scalp.

F2eb9c945a9afb8dfe06e6ea99fcb34b

(213)

on October 07, 2011
at 02:20 PM

How did ya'll figure out to use white vinegar instead of apple cider vinegar?

Ea776df66c8277321b167e2ee3f22574

(316)

on October 07, 2011
at 12:32 PM

I also dilute the white vinegar when I pour it on my hair (a splash of vinegar to a cup of water).

  • F2eb9c945a9afb8dfe06e6ea99fcb34b

    asked by

    (213)
  • Views
    30.1K
  • Last Activity
    1432D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

12 Answers

best answer

4
E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

on October 07, 2011
at 04:11 AM

I have very fine hair and I've been doing no poo for a while now. It took MONTHS for my hair to adjust, and it never totally did until my vacation to Florida. The water there is much softer than the water where I live. I could have gone over a week without doing the baking soda/vinegar scrub/rinse that I have to do twice a week at home.

Three things that helped me- 1.) wearing my hair up after the first day (now that I've adjusted, I can wear my hair down most of the time), 2.) using white vinegar instead of ACV. I don't know why, but this made a huge difference. And 3.) NOT letting the vinegar soak in. The longer the vinegar sits in my hair, the more it feels and looks greasy later. I literally just pour it on, run my hands through, and then rinse off.

I plan to get a shower filter with my Christmas money next year. Now that I know what a huge difference soft water makes, it's worth the investment to me.

Ea776df66c8277321b167e2ee3f22574

(316)

on October 07, 2011
at 12:32 PM

I also dilute the white vinegar when I pour it on my hair (a splash of vinegar to a cup of water).

F2eb9c945a9afb8dfe06e6ea99fcb34b

(213)

on October 07, 2011
at 02:20 PM

How did ya'll figure out to use white vinegar instead of apple cider vinegar?

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on October 07, 2011
at 07:14 PM

Lauren- I do too. Actually, I keep the watered vinegar in a condiment bottle in the shower, and I do the same thing with the baking soda- so much easier than trying to scrub the powder into my scalp.

E2b9c679315c7c9c7265783dde89f350

(1303)

on October 07, 2011
at 07:16 PM

Eedlewee- Basically, I ran out of ACV, and I'd read of other people using various types of vinegar, so I tried it. Actually, I was going to try the red wine vinegar, but I couldn't find it (I never use it, so I buried it in the back of a high cupboard). It worked better and it's cheaper, so I keep using it. Some people do better with other vinegars, though- so I recommend just trying them until you find the right one. It's soooo much better than conditioner used to be, but it does smell a bit when my hair gets wet.

3
0e2772604bdb3627525b42d77340538b

on October 07, 2011
at 02:27 PM

I have shoulder-length fine, thick hair. I found ACV to be too much for my hair, also, and use white vinegar. I put 1T BS, ~1t sea salt, and a drop of Tea Tree oil in a container with ~12oz water and use that about once a week. Oh, and I don't use it all at once - the container lasts for awhile. Then rinse with diluted white vinegar and water. Rinse once or twice between washings.

I'm gradually spacing out my washings, used to be 3x per week, then 2x, now one.

Clean pillowcases help. Depending on how often you change your sheets, and how you sleep, you can just use one side of your pillow, then turn it over to avoid having to completely change your case before you change sheets.

I haven't used regular shampoo for about 2 years.

3
8fddf09738448bbe25843911d3704dd8

on October 07, 2011
at 03:31 AM

I have fine hair & love it! There's a transition period u need to wait out though. Your hair is used to overproducing oil to compensate for the chemical loaded shampoo. Mine took 3 weeks, & I've heard of others taking longer. But after that, you've got to make sure your recipe is right. The baking soda & acv both go a long way! Not much is needed. Good luck!

2
8c5533ffe71bd4262fedc7e898ead1ba

on October 07, 2011
at 09:43 AM

I have thin and fine (and dry) hair. Or I did before I gave up the 'poo. I started with a 1 month experiment and it took 3 weeks for things to normalize (and that 3rd week was yucky), but I haven't gone back. I don't use anything at all except water. Since last May. No baking soda, no vinegar, nothing. It seems like about once a month for a couple of days, my hair feels "dirty" but otherwise, it is perfect -- soft, with a big of body, smooth.

I don't use a brush or comb either (but I do have short hair).

I say give it a full month, and try a full month of only water, then take it from there.

1
438f223fe7688130a539378e35ceef76

(10)

on February 28, 2013
at 10:30 PM

I also have straight, thick hair and use white vinegar for my no'poo rinse, but the smell was really overwhelming for me, so I tweaked it a bit. Basically, I took an old pickle jar filled halfway with white vinegar and added chunks of the peel from an orange and a grapefruit, put the lid back on, and let it infuse under the sink for about two weeks. Actually, this is the same vinegar I use for household cleaning (in a 1:1 ratio with filtered water in a spray bottle).

I use about 2 T of this infused vinegar with a cup of filtered water in a spray bottle, apply a few spritzes, and rinse it with cool water for the final minute of my shower. The citrus doesn't seem to alter the effect of the rinse or interfere with my hair color (very dark brown), but the smell is much more tolerable. I hardly notice it anymore, although be warned, the original jar of infused vinegar will still be quite strong! I might add a few sprigs of rosemary to the infusion next time. Anyone else doing vinegar infusions?

1
03f5a69fde4012b827ebdb6d93b71e7a

on December 02, 2011
at 07:01 PM

Yep, fine wavy hair here. I posted a thread a while back too: http://paleohacks.com/questions/60623/no-poo-ladies-hack-my-frizzy-hair

It's still working great for me, and I honestly didn't have that much of an initial adjustment period. It made my hair a bit wavier, but I didn't really notice that much difference compared to regular shampoo/conditioner, so it was more like "why on earth am I using this stuff every day then?"

I am starting to use a shampoo/conditioner from Shea Moisture occasionally, so I guess I'm becoming more "low-poo". Their ingredients are the first I've found in a commercial product that I'm comfortable with using. My ends need a conditioner to not frizz, and once in a while if I'm super greasy/sweaty, it's just nice to give my roots a gentle wash with something that smells great :)

1
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 02, 2011
at 03:07 AM

Like Sara, I have shoulder length fine hair although it's probably fairly thick for how fine it is. If not shampooed for some time, my hair gets stiff and oily but tends to be dry for a few days after using commercial shampoo. I also have sensitive skin that itches, gets hives or burns from the vast majority of commercial hygiene products.

Have you heard of soap nuts/berries? The link goes to a page with basic information; it doesn't happen to be the brand I purchased but soap nuts are a generic, natural product.

In other parts of the world, people use them for laundry and personal care. I recently started using soap nuts for laundry and skin care and a soap nut extract for shampooing my hair. There are no suds, no perfume; my laundry comes out soft, fresh and clean.

As for me, I've never been so free of itchy, irritated skin/scalp. My hair is soft and silky without being limp or dry. It takes longer than it used to for my hair to become oily and there's no dry period after washing it.

0
D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on December 28, 2011
at 06:00 PM

I'm doing semi no-poo and I have very fine, thick, straight hair. I've found that my scalp can't take the baking soda at normal strength. I have to use less and dissolve that in boiling water ahead of time. I splash on the vinegar quickly and yes, don't let it sit. Also, try not to get it on your roots. Just the ends. That decreases the oiliness later.

I do think conventional no poo works best for coarse and curly hair, but hey, there has to be a middle ground for us other gals. Just doing some no poo days finally has me able to skip a shampoo every other day. That was HUGE for me!

I'm trying some clay and Ayurvedic herbs for hair now. I can't manage true no poo with my job, and the baking soda isn't feasible on my poor winter scalp. Maybe check out shikakai and cassia and soapnuts? www.hennasooq.com is interesting, as is http://www.terressentials.com/. I like the Terressentials clay wash (works GREAT) enough to order some rhassoul clay to make my own version.

0
Db4ad76f6f307a6f577e175710049172

on December 28, 2011
at 01:55 PM

Don't forget about guys with long hair!

I've got long (a 4 inches past my shoulders) fine, wavy hair (Type 2b), and I'm no 'poo. I've also got a beard, and it's no 'poo.

What I do: baking soda rinse every three or four days. Roughly two tablespoons into a cup of water, suspend the baking soda in the water and pour it over my hair and beard. I'm currently trying to see how amount of baking soda and length of 'soaking time' affects the amount of oil it leaves in my hair, as there's always some oil left over by it, and it's different every time. This isn't entirely bad, as if it was completely stripped of oil, I'd have to use conditioner or something. I might try the white vinegar method.

One thing that I can recommend, is that if you have oily hair near your scalp, and dry ends, brush your hair. I use a boar-bristle brush, which helps to distribute your hair's oils to the ends of your hair. Also, when you brush, start at the tips, and work up, to minimize tangles and breaking hair. Sometimes if my hair is feeling oily, I brush it for a long time (brush it a 100 times a day?), and then my hair doesn't feel that bad anymore, and it also looks nice.

D5d982a898721d3392c85f951d0bf0aa

(2417)

on December 28, 2011
at 05:55 PM

I think he means to start at the ends to minimize the amount of tangles you're pulling downwards, stressing the hair. You progressively move up as you detangle. This is how I was taught when I was still a long fine blond haired child.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 28, 2011
at 04:18 PM

I'm confused--how do you brush from the tips up? That "teases" or fluffs the hair and it was the fashion in the 70s but as I recall it caused more breakage rather than less.

Db4ad76f6f307a6f577e175710049172

(2297)

on December 29, 2011
at 10:53 AM

sundownv has got it - brush downwards starting around the tips, and progressively make your strokes longer as you brush. Going no 'poo has helped tangling and stuff a lot, as when my hair is rather oily, I don't have as much problems with tangling.

0
196f25bf6478e0c90deec669ad881f8b

on December 28, 2011
at 11:16 AM

I have fine shoulder length hair and I'm entering my third week of experimenting with the no poo method. I was starting to feel very discouraged but this last wash has given me hope again. I may just continue after all. My first attempt was alright with only a cup of water and a little BS (probably less than a tablespoon). For the second attempt I followed internet instructions more closely, used 1 tbs BS to 1 cup water and 1 tbs ACV to one cup water after the BS mix. The result was awful. It made my hair feel waxy in the shower and dry as hay when I dried it. Granted it was easy to comb but ick. I did this three more times and found my head itching, getting greasier, my hair having more static and being like straw. I was about the give up. Then I read someone who said that they put a bit of ACV BEFORE the BS to help them get rid of the waxy feeling in the shower. I did this and it seemed to help. But what I think has really worked this time is that I REDUCED THE AMOUNT OF BS ratio to water. I just washed my hair with 1 TEASPOON of BS to 1 cup of FILTERED WATER. The filtered water may have helped too because we have hard water here. The result is pretty surprising. It's not exactly as effective (silky, shiny and squeeky clean) as shampoo YET but it has body, the static is gone and the straw-like feeling is gone too. Yay!

0
7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on December 02, 2011
at 02:35 AM

I have shoulder length fine, thin hair. I'm really prone to frizzies, especially here in New England. I didn't have a transition period when I switched to no-poo. I massage the baking soda into my scalp and through my hair, then rinse really well with water, then condition with ACV plus water. I use maybe a tablespoon or two to a cup of water in a small bottle and pour it over my hair. Then I rinse again. I think some people find different methods work better for their own hair.

0
3ec82663c71ecbd1db95f17a1eb4f982

on October 07, 2011
at 02:55 PM

I have fine, thin hair with a curly perm. As a kid, my hair was very thick. Once my thyroid went into its decline, my hair has also declined. Would switching to a shampoo from the health food store be better? If something doesn't get applied to my freshly washed hair, it gets big and fuzzy. I'd like to get away from the commercial chemical stuff from the salon but haven't found a way to look good without it yet. I'm up for advice. :)

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on December 02, 2011
at 02:40 AM

Try coconut oil- rinse it out if you want.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!