4

votes

What ski boots should I use??

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 12, 2011 at 7:39 PM

I've been on vibram five fingers and vivo barefoot shoes for 2 years. I used to have planters fasciitis, pain in running, pain in skiing, etc.

Pain is now totally gone from running. I still love to ski and I haven't changed anything in regards to boots yet. Just by my feet getting stronger, 70% of the pain I had skiing has gone away.

I'd like to buy the right type of boots and I haven't found anyone that skiis or fits boots, that also follows the minimalist mindset.

Any suggestions for boots or boot fitters???

04f2eae4450112cdedce7235923c646d

(1112)

on November 16, 2011
at 09:01 PM

BTW, to prevent cold feet and as a result of narrow toes, I always put spacers between my toes and an extra cap over my toes when fitting the boots, so there is enough space to move around my toes, but nothing more, when skiing.

04f2eae4450112cdedce7235923c646d

(1112)

on November 16, 2011
at 08:58 PM

My experience is to find the tightest boot shell I can possibly fit my feet inside, and then do a mold/thermal adjustment. The inner boot will get sloppier and looser after use anyways, so I would like as little mass in my inner boots as possible. This has lead to the best fitting telemark boots I have ever had, in fact the best ski boot I've had no matter which discipline. I agree on the rest of what you say when it comes to tightness.

04f2eae4450112cdedce7235923c646d

(1112)

on November 14, 2011
at 02:41 AM

As the saying goes: "Norwegians are born with skis on their feet" ;)

Cc7381bd787721575ea9198048132adb

(5541)

on November 13, 2011
at 04:32 PM

And his name is Lars. If I have to take skiing advice, it'll be from a Nordic name like Lars.

Cc7381bd787721575ea9198048132adb

(5541)

on November 13, 2011
at 04:30 PM

It's relevant because minimalist ideals are held by a lot of paleo suporters. Maybe his success with using minimalist gear could translate into other sports than just running? That's how come.

Cc7381bd787721575ea9198048132adb

(5541)

on November 13, 2011
at 04:28 PM

It's relevant the minimalist ideals that a lot of paleo supporters also hold. That's how come.

0d2dec01a5ed9363a9915e111ae13f7e

(4583)

on November 13, 2011
at 04:20 AM

I'd agree with Lars. I broke out my old 3-pin telemark set up last winter for a couple runs at the local lifts. Floppy, low cut, flexi leather boots. It was just a horror show. I go barefoot/minimal shoes 90% the past 3 years. But blowing $50 on a lift ticket to risk injury on substandard equipment seems a long way to go. Get some good fitting plastic boots, experiment a bit if you can demo things.

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5 Answers

4
04f2eae4450112cdedce7235923c646d

(1112)

on November 12, 2011
at 08:14 PM

I ski Dalbello for my twin tip powder skis and my stiff semi-race carving skis, and I use Scarpa TX Pro (with thermally adjusted liners) for all my telemark skis.

What goes for minimalist ski boots? I don't give a damn. When I ski I want as much support and contact with the ski as possible. My barefoot experience/stimuli will be enough from all the workouts and running I do in my VFFs. I have more loose boots with more of a minimalistic mindset, and I hate skiing in them. I feel unsecure, my form gets sloppy and I ski like a whimp. I remember the first season with my Scarpa TX Pros, they hurt like hell under the middle of my foot, and I had to loosen them after every single run. After a few times, my foot strengthened and no more pain! I assume it will be the same this season as well. I've heard some soles might help, but I am not willing to try this out because I know my foot will adjust to it within a couple of days.

If you want a good ski boot: Try several different boots (brands as well, not just models), if no one fit perfectly the first time, they might if you get them thermally molded to your foot. If everyting else fails, Surefoot has some awesome boots if you don't find any boot that suits you, but they are PRICEY.

Remember, everyone has different feet. Ski boots is not like VFF where "one model pretty much fits 'em all". The boot that fits perfectly for me feels like horrible for my friend, and vice versa, so don't make the mistake of buying the highest rated boot without trying other boots as well.

Just my 2 cents, Lars, free heel skier.

0d2dec01a5ed9363a9915e111ae13f7e

(4583)

on November 13, 2011
at 04:20 AM

I'd agree with Lars. I broke out my old 3-pin telemark set up last winter for a couple runs at the local lifts. Floppy, low cut, flexi leather boots. It was just a horror show. I go barefoot/minimal shoes 90% the past 3 years. But blowing $50 on a lift ticket to risk injury on substandard equipment seems a long way to go. Get some good fitting plastic boots, experiment a bit if you can demo things.

Cc7381bd787721575ea9198048132adb

(5541)

on November 13, 2011
at 04:32 PM

And his name is Lars. If I have to take skiing advice, it'll be from a Nordic name like Lars.

04f2eae4450112cdedce7235923c646d

(1112)

on November 14, 2011
at 02:41 AM

As the saying goes: "Norwegians are born with skis on their feet" ;)

2
25329057c9d5f6364a74787c8c2302e7

on November 15, 2011
at 02:16 PM

I'm both a barefoot runner and a skier. Barefoot running makes sense under the theory that man evolved running and persistence hunting. Unless you are descended from exclusively Scandinavians and your ancestors moved there a million years before any other humans, you did NOT evolve to ski. This is why boots significantly modify the biomechanics of you foot by being insanely rigid. I'm an avid skier too, and nothing beats the feeling of taking off those boots and walking barefoot at the end of the day, but I don't think you've got anything to gain by seeking out minimalist boots.

Minimalism makes sense only for things humans are built optimally for.

For example, minimalist flying? Jumping. Doesn't get you to Maui very fast!

1
00c8eb3f6e6a1884216044ca29cf868a

on November 16, 2011
at 05:07 AM

There's no such thing as a minimalist downhill, telemark, or AT ski boot. However, there IS a way to fit boots that will make your feet much happier, and it has nothing to do with how most bootfitters work.

Most bootfitters will do a "shell fit", where they evaluate the fit by how many fingers they can shove behind your heel. They'll try to put you in the narrowest "last" (measured at the ball of the foot) they can, and with the least amount of room for your toes that they can.

This is baloney. Crushing your toes does nothing for control of the ski. Zero. Zip. Nada.

What gives you control of the ski is a tight interface between the boot shell and your shin and instep. Your heel shouldn't be able to come up off the boot board by much, if at all, and your shin should contact the entire tongue of the boot, not just at the top. Otherwise you need a lower-volume boot, where that contour matches the contour of your own shin and instep. (A low instep is a "low-volume" foot, and a high instep is a "high-volume" foot.) Alternatively, if the boot crushes your instep, you need a higher-volume foot.

Concentrate on the place where your foot and shin meet. If there is space there, your foot will slide around no matter what you do! Find the widest boot you can that holds that area down securely. If the shin/instep interface is good and your ankle/heel is held securely, you ought to be able to saw the toe of the boot off entirely with no loss of ski control.

Contact me through my website if this isn't clear. I know my skiing biomechanics, I know my ski boots, and I know what you're after here. And there's more to it: this is just the start.

JS

04f2eae4450112cdedce7235923c646d

(1112)

on November 16, 2011
at 09:01 PM

BTW, to prevent cold feet and as a result of narrow toes, I always put spacers between my toes and an extra cap over my toes when fitting the boots, so there is enough space to move around my toes, but nothing more, when skiing.

04f2eae4450112cdedce7235923c646d

(1112)

on November 16, 2011
at 08:58 PM

My experience is to find the tightest boot shell I can possibly fit my feet inside, and then do a mold/thermal adjustment. The inner boot will get sloppier and looser after use anyways, so I would like as little mass in my inner boots as possible. This has lead to the best fitting telemark boots I have ever had, in fact the best ski boot I've had no matter which discipline. I agree on the rest of what you say when it comes to tightness.

0
218f4d92627e4289cc81178fce5b4d00

on November 15, 2011
at 12:36 PM

ski boots are the polar opposite of minimalistic footwear! not every aspect of your life needs to fit into a bare bones paleo life. Skiing, you absolutely need decent boots, as a 30 year veteran on the snow I can attest to this. As for the best footing boot, I have found the Tecnica are the best for wide feet. I tried on dozens of different brands, and tecnica were the ones many people recommend for wide feet and I concur with that. My advice is to try on as many pairs as possible and buy the ones that fit you best, thats what I did. Get them properly fitted by an expert and you are away. My current pair of boots are perfectly fitted to my feet, never had a problem. Prior to that was nightmare after nightmare.

-1
D45e43b08cd99a04f5d4294a871e1078

(1010)

on November 13, 2011
at 04:24 PM

Woah, how come this question isn't deleted?

Cc7381bd787721575ea9198048132adb

(5541)

on November 13, 2011
at 04:30 PM

It's relevant because minimalist ideals are held by a lot of paleo suporters. Maybe his success with using minimalist gear could translate into other sports than just running? That's how come.

Cc7381bd787721575ea9198048132adb

(5541)

on November 13, 2011
at 04:28 PM

It's relevant the minimalist ideals that a lot of paleo supporters also hold. That's how come.

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