1

votes

What are the best choices for acidic foods?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created September 28, 2012 at 10:26 AM

One more question for today: I need to find some appropriate acidic foods for salads and bone broth.

I am cautious about using wine in bone broth because most wines have sulfites.

I do not like the taste of the apple cider vinegar, but if it is healthy for me, I am willing to re-introduce it.

What is more nutritionally dense - lemon juice or apple cider vinegar?

Any other choices of acidic foods that are low in carbohydrates and healthier for you?

How about cranberries? Or sea buckthorn?

Does lemon juice have any antinutrients?

If you think lemon juice is better, can I add it to bone broth or will it lose all the nutrients after 24 hour simmering?

Thanks a lot.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 29, 2012
at 11:48 AM

More like apple derivatives and lemon derivatives

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 29, 2012
at 11:47 AM

They don. They add flavor. That was my point. Make it taste good

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 29, 2012
at 05:13 AM

I did not know chicory and turnips add acidity. But I love blood oranges and I might add them to things. Thanks for the tip.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 28, 2012
at 11:35 PM

That's all personal preference. With my beef bones I use a chanti because I like the flavor. I am not worried about the acidity make up. For chicken and pork I usually add a blood orange because I think the citrus flavor makes it brighter, but again not for the acidity. In the winter I might add some chicory or turnips

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 28, 2012
at 08:42 PM

Honestly, I don't remember. I usually follow the recipe in Nourishing Traditions...don't remember how much it calls for. I also followed the one in the book Practical Paleo (using a slow cooker), and I remember using more than the recipe called for. Maybe 1/4 cup? Depends on how large a batch you're making, or how many bones you're using.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 28, 2012
at 07:46 PM

Good answer, Dan. The heat of simmering the broth kills the live enzymes in the lemon juice and the vinegar (if using raw vinegar, of course). In the context of broth, you don't use the acid for nutrition, you use it to help get the minerals out of the bones. If you want the alkalinity boost of the citrus, add fresh squeezed lemon or lime to a glass of water.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 07:46 PM

How much vinegar do you add?

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 28, 2012
at 07:44 PM

I've made plenty of bone broth and I've never been able to taste any vinegar in the final product. (I've used both ACV and regular white vinegar.)

7c9f81d68c78de1a31eab9c91c17b4b8

on September 28, 2012
at 06:52 PM

They would just as well I think.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 05:47 PM

Yes. Why, is it wrong? I just one one flavor. I cannot make up my mind what to add to my bone broth - vinegar, wine, lemon or tomato. What do you think about tomato acidity? Is it sour enough?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 28, 2012
at 04:17 PM

I get what you are asking, but using vauge terms like "Nutritionally dense" and then comparing two products that have very different uses makes no sense. Is your goal to use as few ingredients as possible?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 04:06 PM

http://www.glamour.com/health-fitness/blogs/vitamin-g/2010/02/the-top-10-most-nutrient-dense.html

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 04:05 PM

http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/healthy-eating/health-starts-here/resources-and-tools/top-ten-andi-scores#Fruit

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 04:04 PM

http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/healthy-eating/health-starts-here/resources-and-tools/top-ten-andi-scores#Fruit

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 04:00 PM

Not lemon juice? Thanks for your answer.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 03:59 PM

Thanks, so I will probably use lemon juice. BTW, what is wrong with comparing apples and oranges? I think oranges are more nutrient-dense.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 02:29 PM

No, that's not the right link! I don't want a list of acidifying foods - I would like to know which acidic foods are the best.

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3 Answers

3
194d8e8140425057fe06202e1e5822a7

(3979)

on September 28, 2012
at 03:28 PM

"What is more nutritionally dense - lemon juice or apple cider vinegar?" You are almost literally comparing apples and oranges here. They are both nutritious in different ways.

Apple Cider Vinegar is a useful and healthy addition to bone broth. Lemon juice or ACV are good for dressing salads (mixed in with avocado is good, too).

Raw, fermented foods are an example of very beneficial acidic foods.

The point of adding ACV or lemon juice to bone broth is not to add nutrients, it's to help draw out the minerals and amino acids from the bones and collagen. I wouldn't worry about destroying the nutritive content with boiling.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 29, 2012
at 11:48 AM

More like apple derivatives and lemon derivatives

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 04:05 PM

http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/healthy-eating/health-starts-here/resources-and-tools/top-ten-andi-scores#Fruit

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 04:06 PM

http://www.glamour.com/health-fitness/blogs/vitamin-g/2010/02/the-top-10-most-nutrient-dense.html

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on September 28, 2012
at 07:46 PM

Good answer, Dan. The heat of simmering the broth kills the live enzymes in the lemon juice and the vinegar (if using raw vinegar, of course). In the context of broth, you don't use the acid for nutrition, you use it to help get the minerals out of the bones. If you want the alkalinity boost of the citrus, add fresh squeezed lemon or lime to a glass of water.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 03:59 PM

Thanks, so I will probably use lemon juice. BTW, what is wrong with comparing apples and oranges? I think oranges are more nutrient-dense.

1
7c9f81d68c78de1a31eab9c91c17b4b8

on September 28, 2012
at 03:25 PM

I think the apple cider vinegar is best nutritionally to draw out the minerals but...if you do not like the taste then I would just use ascorbic acid(vitamin C powder) which you can get in a health food store. It has a mild taste.

7c9f81d68c78de1a31eab9c91c17b4b8

on September 28, 2012
at 06:52 PM

They would just as well I think.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 04:00 PM

Not lemon juice? Thanks for your answer.

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 28, 2012
at 12:39 PM

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 04:04 PM

http://www.wholefoodsmarket.com/healthy-eating/health-starts-here/resources-and-tools/top-ten-andi-scores#Fruit

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 28, 2012
at 11:35 PM

That's all personal preference. With my beef bones I use a chanti because I like the flavor. I am not worried about the acidity make up. For chicken and pork I usually add a blood orange because I think the citrus flavor makes it brighter, but again not for the acidity. In the winter I might add some chicory or turnips

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 29, 2012
at 05:13 AM

I did not know chicory and turnips add acidity. But I love blood oranges and I might add them to things. Thanks for the tip.

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 05:47 PM

Yes. Why, is it wrong? I just one one flavor. I cannot make up my mind what to add to my bone broth - vinegar, wine, lemon or tomato. What do you think about tomato acidity? Is it sour enough?

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 29, 2012
at 11:47 AM

They don. They add flavor. That was my point. Make it taste good

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on September 28, 2012
at 04:17 PM

I get what you are asking, but using vauge terms like "Nutritionally dense" and then comparing two products that have very different uses makes no sense. Is your goal to use as few ingredients as possible?

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on September 28, 2012
at 02:29 PM

No, that's not the right link! I don't want a list of acidifying foods - I would like to know which acidic foods are the best.

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