2

votes

hidden ingredients in wine?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 09, 2013 at 5:29 AM

I've been reading some things about hidden bad ingredients that don't have to be listed in wine and champagne in the EU anyway(http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/uknews/5027710/Wine-ingredients-including-fish-and-charcoal-should-be-listed-on-the-bottle-say-regulators.html). Seems like it would be likely it would be the same in Canada where I live or the US. but I've noticed that a lot of the paleo sort of health articles and comments i've read haven't brought that up as an issue. Of course I did find this article on beer in the US. (http://foodbabe.com/2013/07/17/the-shocking-ingredients-in-beer/). I don't drink beer but just another indication that there could be problems there.

what do you guys think?

Another thing: I prefer to have red wine myself.. but my wife really doesn't like wine at all, just champagne. So we drink that a lot (in moderation of course). I understand it usually has sugar added to it though. Does anyone know how much sugar is typically used and how much of an issue that is?

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on August 09, 2013
at 02:22 PM

@eddiosh, that works if you get the dry kinds, otherwise if they're sweet, they have left over sugars.

718fd304d7abab150730638bf2be5153

(184)

on August 09, 2013
at 02:20 PM

Yes that is correct. Although I know at least one lady who wouldn't mind sipping a whole bottle, but that's another matter :)

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 09, 2013
at 12:59 PM

How many liters of champagne do you drink in a sitting that the 12 grams of sugar per liter matters? 150 mL (5 ounces) is maybe 1-2 grams of sugar per glass, negligible.

A08b210e4da7e69cd792bddc1f4aae4b

(1031)

on August 09, 2013
at 08:15 AM

Champagne is double fermented I believe. They add extra sugar to create further alcohol so it might not be as sugar heavy as you suspect (although possibly more than wine).

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4 Answers

best answer

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 09, 2013
at 12:56 PM

The "additives" are there to clarify the wine primarily. You don't drink them. They're removed either by filtration or sedimentation prior to bottling. Not a problem in my opinion. Not that they would be problematic even if you drank them.

1
0b7c3e7fd96005f0b2dfd781e512fc2e

(1237)

on August 09, 2013
at 08:42 PM

Most wines you get at the supermarket/off-license contain sulphites. Sulphites are more common in white wines (to preserve the colour) but are also used in many reds. It should say whether it contains sulphites on the label.

I have also heard that wine contains yeast. Dunno how common this is, though.

1
718fd304d7abab150730638bf2be5153

(184)

on August 09, 2013
at 11:59 AM

It depends on the label of the champagne :

  • Extra Brut (less than 6 grams of residual sugar per liter)
  • Brut (less than 12 grams)
  • Extra Sec (between 12 and 17 grams)
  • Sec (between 17 and 32 grams)
  • Demi-sec (between 32 and 50 grams)
  • Doux (50 grams)

Most of the champagne sold worldwide is Brut, and has low (but still significant) sugar content. As for the other ingredients, each producer has their own secret recipe for improving the taste - although in France there are strict limits for what is allowed. And in general, the higher the price, the least amount of weird additives you will get.

718fd304d7abab150730638bf2be5153

(184)

on August 09, 2013
at 02:20 PM

Yes that is correct. Although I know at least one lady who wouldn't mind sipping a whole bottle, but that's another matter :)

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on August 09, 2013
at 12:59 PM

How many liters of champagne do you drink in a sitting that the 12 grams of sugar per liter matters? 150 mL (5 ounces) is maybe 1-2 grams of sugar per glass, negligible.

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on August 09, 2013
at 02:22 PM

Some wines use a gluten glue to seal the barrel they are in and some winds up in the wine. So this is why I tend to go for things like tequila, whiskeys, rum, and vodka instead.

Not to go too far on a tangent, but for some idiotic reason ingredients aren't listed on alcoholic beverages. So who knows if things like hard lemonade are safe, or if they contain aspertame or other toxic crap?

Best to stay with the purest stuff you can get and give your liver far less work to do.

There is one trick you can try if you have some cheap vodka: run it through a carbon water filter (like those Britta pitcher filters). This gets rid of some of the impurities and you're left with a higher quality vodka than you purchased. (Obviously don't do this with wines or you'll get mostly water, ditto for alcohols where you want to keep the flavor.)

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