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Whey from buttermilk

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created April 16, 2011 at 9:47 PM

My family makes "SKyr", an Icelandic yoghurt-like substane from buttermilk. The buttermilk is 'de-wheyed', meaning(I guess) that the whey is extracted and can be jarred as a liquid in the fridge. I am wondering if anyone has an understanding of the nutritional properties of this sort of whey and whether it would be a good idea to drink it? I hate to see food go to waste(assuming it is food which I'd wager).

21a2813241857e7532967e32e490061b

(50)

on April 17, 2011
at 04:54 PM

I found a website with this information. For every 100 g it is 121 mg of calcium (RDA 17%), phosphorus 70 mg (RDA 10%), b-1 0,11 mg (RDA 3%), magnesium 10 mg (RDA 3%), zink 0,4 mg (RDA 3%). I'm no expert though, it's not very popular nowadays though skyr is. I have no idea how to make one myself. All this is just information I have found on the whey. Might need to ferment the whey to get all the benefits of the probiotic that's how it's been done here. How's Iceland doing? That's a very open question:) If you mean regards to the diet then not so good.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2011
at 02:29 AM

I would just drink it straight. ANy idea of the calcium content in terms of "percent daily req." or mg.? The probiotic angle looks good though. How is Iceland doing?

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3 Answers

1
21a2813241857e7532967e32e490061b

(50)

on April 16, 2011
at 11:31 PM

I'm Icelandic and I actually have a carton of whey. There it says that for centuries icelandic people drank they whey and used it to preserve food like meat. For every 100gr there is 4,2 g carbohydrates and 0,4 gr protein. The probiotics in it breaks the lactose in it and makes it sour. It also says that if you preserve food with whey it enhances the nutrion of the food especially calcium, B-1 and B-2 that comes from it.

It also includes some recipe for cooking with fish. It doesn??t say so but I have also heard (never tried it though) that you can use it instead of white wine in recipes.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on April 17, 2011
at 02:29 AM

I would just drink it straight. ANy idea of the calcium content in terms of "percent daily req." or mg.? The probiotic angle looks good though. How is Iceland doing?

21a2813241857e7532967e32e490061b

(50)

on April 17, 2011
at 04:54 PM

I found a website with this information. For every 100 g it is 121 mg of calcium (RDA 17%), phosphorus 70 mg (RDA 10%), b-1 0,11 mg (RDA 3%), magnesium 10 mg (RDA 3%), zink 0,4 mg (RDA 3%). I'm no expert though, it's not very popular nowadays though skyr is. I have no idea how to make one myself. All this is just information I have found on the whey. Might need to ferment the whey to get all the benefits of the probiotic that's how it's been done here. How's Iceland doing? That's a very open question:) If you mean regards to the diet then not so good.

0
Medium avatar

(10601)

on July 10, 2011
at 09:16 PM

This sounds similar to the liquid that separates from yogurt or cheese when you strain them. It's mostly lactose/lactic acid, plus some soluble protein. In Norway and Italy similar wheys are used to make the whey cheeses gjetost and real ricotta (ie recurdled). Commercial ricotta is something quite different.

0
2ab6415f5f20b8fe1d34a94c7be85e6a

on July 10, 2011
at 06:50 AM

No whey(pun intended) would i drink it cus i'm kind of anti most dairy but i know what you mean about the whole not wasting stuff so if you can tolerate it its probably not to bad to drink straight.

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