1

votes

pre 1970 strain of wheat, is it available?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 01, 2012 at 2:07 PM

I would like to keep some wheat in my diet but wanna see if the non mutant strain would be any better. is there a farm somewhere thst still grows it?

193f00d53ebcb13940c7a55afc78ad17

(1260)

on October 02, 2012
at 01:58 PM

Or crushed pork rinds: http://paleohacks.com/questions/122385/what-do-you-think-update-on-pork-bread-usage-with-recipe

7c379a865738d2b373a362dc0f1d9459

(357)

on October 01, 2012
at 10:59 PM

I am allergic to wheat, my doctor suggested I use spelt instead. I avoid grains so I have not tried it but I find this interesting.

Bece741db5f5fed6bafa12e3548f973f

(715)

on October 01, 2012
at 10:23 PM

Spelt might be an old grain, but I wouldn't trust that it hasn't been bred up commercially just like wheat has.

Bece741db5f5fed6bafa12e3548f973f

(715)

on October 01, 2012
at 10:21 PM

I've never been real crazy about the Bob's Red Mill Stuff. When I've bought it locally, I think it seems like it must sit around too long. I did buy some Jovial Pastas at Hyvee stores. They are very good. I purchased Einkorn wheat berries through a food co-op, but Jovial online has a good price. Follow their recipes for bread. Don't try substituting their wheat flour into a recipe of your own one cup for one cup. I think you'll find that it won't work real well, at least the whole grain stuff. The ground wheat berries made a much lighter flour, like a pastry flour.

8d454fc50d6d58643d6f8b0d1e7ea8ea

(2830)

on October 01, 2012
at 07:42 PM

If you are open to the Perfect Health Diet that allows rice, white potatoes and tapioca, you can make a pizza crust: http://glutenfreegirl.com/gluten-free-pizza-2/ -- you can also make pizza crusts from cauliflower or (my favorite) meat (aka "meatza").

F5a0ddffcf9ef5beca864050f090a790

(15515)

on October 01, 2012
at 05:02 PM

LOL. I just love your question. No, they all are mutants. But one doctor I trust encourages sprouted Esekiel bread if you are not celiac.

7dab2d8c97e44d8d0c298e5c9d5d75bc

(641)

on October 01, 2012
at 03:23 PM

Good to know- Thank you!

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on October 01, 2012
at 02:36 PM

Ive had einkorn pasta, which tasted like whole wheat pasta with slightly less chewyness.

7dab2d8c97e44d8d0c298e5c9d5d75bc

(641)

on October 01, 2012
at 02:30 PM

I just googled it. It's definitely attainable. I hear it tastes a lot more "grainy" than normal wheat we are used to post 1970. Let me know how it goes!

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on October 01, 2012
at 02:30 PM

uhh since when was no wheat a universal tenet of paleo?

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9 Answers

6
2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on October 01, 2012
at 03:55 PM

ah, forget it. I can live without pizza. seems like wheat overall is too much trouble for what it's worth

8d454fc50d6d58643d6f8b0d1e7ea8ea

(2830)

on October 01, 2012
at 07:42 PM

If you are open to the Perfect Health Diet that allows rice, white potatoes and tapioca, you can make a pizza crust: http://glutenfreegirl.com/gluten-free-pizza-2/ -- you can also make pizza crusts from cauliflower or (my favorite) meat (aka "meatza").

193f00d53ebcb13940c7a55afc78ad17

(1260)

on October 02, 2012
at 01:58 PM

Or crushed pork rinds: http://paleohacks.com/questions/122385/what-do-you-think-update-on-pork-bread-usage-with-recipe

3
193f00d53ebcb13940c7a55afc78ad17

on October 01, 2012
at 02:21 PM

I doubt that PH is the place to ask. This is a community that eats no wheat so, odds are, people here are not going to know about specific wheat growers/suppliers. I am, however, tempted to say that no commercial grower is likely to produce it. Check with the seed savers exchange and see if they have any seeds for the pre1970 variety.

2e6e673ce3eb647407d260d4d57a731b

(1021)

on October 01, 2012
at 02:30 PM

uhh since when was no wheat a universal tenet of paleo?

2
7dc950fc76a046048e683d2a27dced37

on October 01, 2012
at 06:24 PM

Tropical Traditions sells an einkorn flour made in Italy. You may be able to find a discount for their site in the paleo community (Balanced Bites has promoted their other products regularly I believe).

2
4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on October 01, 2012
at 02:38 PM

Einkorn is supposibly the "original" wheat, though it can be hard to find (i.e. order it online.). Spelt is easier to find, and a similarly historical wheat strain. Kamut can be found in some specialty markets.

All of these are anecdotally easier to digest than modern wheat, but do contain gluten and can cause gluten issues.

2
7dab2d8c97e44d8d0c298e5c9d5d75bc

(641)

on October 01, 2012
at 02:29 PM

Yes, it was called einkorn wheat.

You can find a name through Dr. Davis, author of wheat belly of someone in Massachusetts.

He was/is a diabetic and found relatively no change in his blood sugar from the old wheat.

I have celiac disease, so I will never try it, as it will still cause a reaction for me since I'm totally gluten intolerant!

7dab2d8c97e44d8d0c298e5c9d5d75bc

(641)

on October 01, 2012
at 03:23 PM

Good to know- Thank you!

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on October 01, 2012
at 02:36 PM

Ive had einkorn pasta, which tasted like whole wheat pasta with slightly less chewyness.

7dab2d8c97e44d8d0c298e5c9d5d75bc

(641)

on October 01, 2012
at 02:30 PM

I just googled it. It's definitely attainable. I hear it tastes a lot more "grainy" than normal wheat we are used to post 1970. Let me know how it goes!

1
363d0a0277a8b61ada3a24ab3ad85d5a

(4642)

on October 01, 2012
at 07:18 PM

Semolina and Durum wheat are older, heritage breeds, and are often used in pasta. Their genetic information is on their wikipedia pages, which is pretty impressive (go wikipedia!). They cannot be used to make bread or anything gluteny and stretchy like bagels, they would be like biting into a rock, but worth testing out if you want to keep some in. I have organic semolina pasta maybe 6-8 times a year with no problems.

1
366c23d69eadce094a2b22299c58a424

(2988)

on October 01, 2012
at 07:08 PM

Jovial makes a number of Einkorn products, including both whole grain and white pastas and even cookies. They also sell the flour separately. Kamut wheat can also be found online pretty easily in breads and cereals (and a bakery near me makes a kamut bread, so it's worth looking around), and of course, spelt products are relatively easy to find (check a natural food store) and so is the flour. Bob's Red Mill sells spelt flour online, and I think they make a cereal too.

Emmer is another old wheat, but I don't know where to buy it.

Bece741db5f5fed6bafa12e3548f973f

(715)

on October 01, 2012
at 10:21 PM

I've never been real crazy about the Bob's Red Mill Stuff. When I've bought it locally, I think it seems like it must sit around too long. I did buy some Jovial Pastas at Hyvee stores. They are very good. I purchased Einkorn wheat berries through a food co-op, but Jovial online has a good price. Follow their recipes for bread. Don't try substituting their wheat flour into a recipe of your own one cup for one cup. I think you'll find that it won't work real well, at least the whole grain stuff. The ground wheat berries made a much lighter flour, like a pastry flour.

0
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on October 01, 2012
at 11:23 PM

In Winthrop, Washington there is a farm that sells Emmer wheat. It is supposed to be a well tolerated heirloom (I still had some issues with it, but I think my deal is more about the fiber content than the gluten because I can eat crappy white bread and pastries without digestive problems).

Here is their site if you want to check them out: http://www.bluebirdgrainfarms.com/products.html

0
3720f5eb63757f8cdbf393ac7530c1c3

(259)

on October 01, 2012
at 09:50 PM

Spelt wheat is very old - I just did a quick Wikipedia on it and it was around in peoples diet as far back as the bronze age! I've seen spelt products in the supermarket and I'm sure you could buy spelt flour in a health food shop. Spelt bread definitely has a different texture to normal bread, its kind of more spongy...

7c379a865738d2b373a362dc0f1d9459

(357)

on October 01, 2012
at 10:59 PM

I am allergic to wheat, my doctor suggested I use spelt instead. I avoid grains so I have not tried it but I find this interesting.

Bece741db5f5fed6bafa12e3548f973f

(715)

on October 01, 2012
at 10:23 PM

Spelt might be an old grain, but I wouldn't trust that it hasn't been bred up commercially just like wheat has.

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