1

votes

if wheat is high in phytic acid but also in phytase doesnt the phytase destroy the phytic acid?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created June 27, 2013 at 8:22 PM

confused how it works

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 26, 2013
at 02:55 PM

I certainly agree with you on that note; my point was that getting free phytase into your diet won't do you any good unless you do it through soaking and sprouting. Trying to ingest phytase and have it do its job inside your body will not work, as the phytin is not soluble in your small intestine. Sorry for the confusion!

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on July 15, 2013
at 11:12 AM

That's all well and good, but I'm afraid gluten, WGA, and the other nasty proteins in wheat and other grains are a far greater evil in terms of the harms they cause than phytase, hence avoid all wheat and most grains. If you have a problem with phytic acid, by all means soak and sprout other stuff all you want, but avoid grains.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 13, 2013
at 12:43 PM

Thanks for clarifying. I had some trouble keeping phytates (the acid) distinguished from the -ase(enzyme). Insofar as attacking the acids it would seem that the purpose of the enzyme is to attack hull phytates and help break down the hull for sprouting. Removed from the hull, ground into flour, cooked and mixed with other foods, the chances that phytase could react with phytate from something other than its original bran still seems very remote.

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 12, 2013
at 05:49 PM

See thhq and I's discussion above, as we noted that wheat flour in its raw state contains phytase, but cooked forms (like bread) likely do not. Futhermore, as the below link notes, the complex that phytic acid is formed in in most plants (compound is phytin) is not very soluble in the small intestine, so phytase is unlikely to have an effect on phytic acid already in your digestive system. Hence soaking and sprouting: they turn the phytin (and the phytic acid it's made of) into a solute that phytase can freely interact with. http://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/as/as-560-w.pdf

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 12, 2013
at 05:45 PM

I think you misunderstood what phytase does. Phytase BREAKS DOWN phytic acid, so that the phytic acid cannot chelate the minerals. Soaking and sprouting enhance the effect of phytase, they don't destroy it. Just important to clarify.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 12, 2013
at 01:14 AM

+1 for realizing that adding bran to the diet will chelate calcium added to the diet. An odd strategy for reducing osteoporosis.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 08, 2013
at 07:58 PM

Soaking and sprouting would probably destroy the enzyme, thereby eliminating chelation.

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 03, 2013
at 02:53 PM

Keep in mind also that phytase is an enzyme and thus is degraded by heat. Baking flour is probably enough heat to break down the enzyme and make it ineffective. Soaking and sprouting help the phytase reaction by putting the minerals into solution with the enzyme, making it more likely the enzyme and the phytic acid will actually interact.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on June 27, 2013
at 10:37 PM

Most grains today have their bran removed, which eliminates most of the small amount of phytic acid the whole grains contain (0.05-0.10%).

  • 91966c954ff6067a43bfc59dd1883a50

    asked by

    (15)
  • Views
    1.2K
  • Last Activity
    1262D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

3 Answers

1
Medium avatar

(10611)

on June 27, 2013
at 10:32 PM

Phytic acid chelates metals. Could eating a piece of bread cause osteoporosis because calcium is bound up? No, because the amount of phytic acid in a piece of bread could only bind a milligram or two of calcium at most. You might get concerned if you were eating bran by the handfuls, but a piece of bread won't destroy your bones.

http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/ap/jc/2002/00000036/00000001/art00441

By the same rationale, phytates won't go hunting for phytic acid molecules to destroy. The concentration is too low to expect that to happen in a dry grain or flour made into bread though it would be a lot more likely in a sprouting seed.

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 03, 2013
at 02:53 PM

Keep in mind also that phytase is an enzyme and thus is degraded by heat. Baking flour is probably enough heat to break down the enzyme and make it ineffective. Soaking and sprouting help the phytase reaction by putting the minerals into solution with the enzyme, making it more likely the enzyme and the phytic acid will actually interact.

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 12, 2013
at 05:45 PM

I think you misunderstood what phytase does. Phytase BREAKS DOWN phytic acid, so that the phytic acid cannot chelate the minerals. Soaking and sprouting enhance the effect of phytase, they don't destroy it. Just important to clarify.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 08, 2013
at 07:58 PM

Soaking and sprouting would probably destroy the enzyme, thereby eliminating chelation.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 13, 2013
at 12:43 PM

Thanks for clarifying. I had some trouble keeping phytates (the acid) distinguished from the -ase(enzyme). Insofar as attacking the acids it would seem that the purpose of the enzyme is to attack hull phytates and help break down the hull for sprouting. Removed from the hull, ground into flour, cooked and mixed with other foods, the chances that phytase could react with phytate from something other than its original bran still seems very remote.

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on July 12, 2013
at 05:08 PM

I'd be far more worried about gluten, WGA, gliadins, etc. and the like than the phytate. Yes, if you could get free phytase, it would counteract phytate.

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 12, 2013
at 05:49 PM

See thhq and I's discussion above, as we noted that wheat flour in its raw state contains phytase, but cooked forms (like bread) likely do not. Futhermore, as the below link notes, the complex that phytic acid is formed in in most plants (compound is phytin) is not very soluble in the small intestine, so phytase is unlikely to have an effect on phytic acid already in your digestive system. Hence soaking and sprouting: they turn the phytin (and the phytic acid it's made of) into a solute that phytase can freely interact with. http://www.extension.purdue.edu/extmedia/as/as-560-w.pdf

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on July 15, 2013
at 11:12 AM

That's all well and good, but I'm afraid gluten, WGA, and the other nasty proteins in wheat and other grains are a far greater evil in terms of the harms they cause than phytase, hence avoid all wheat and most grains. If you have a problem with phytic acid, by all means soak and sprout other stuff all you want, but avoid grains.

C6648ab69e5a1560c7585fe3ba7108fb

(880)

on July 26, 2013
at 02:55 PM

I certainly agree with you on that note; my point was that getting free phytase into your diet won't do you any good unless you do it through soaking and sprouting. Trying to ingest phytase and have it do its job inside your body will not work, as the phytin is not soluble in your small intestine. Sorry for the confusion!

0
2abc7edf08d56505e360c1912008a0f5

on June 27, 2013
at 09:04 PM

Grains contain Phytic Acid, a mineral blocker that prevents absorption of calcium, magnesium, iron, copper and zinc. This phytic acid is found in the bran of all grains as well as the outer coating of seeds and nuts. Even after grains became more mainstream during the agricultural revolution, grains were allowed to sit in the fields for several weeks before thrashing. This allowed the grains to be exposed to the elements and to sprout. Evidence shows that sprouting increases the content of many important vitamins, and breaks down the phytic acid. Unfortunately, grains today are not sprouted and are consumed in much larger quantities than ever before. The presence of the phytates blocks the absorption of calcium, a risk factor for osteoporosis and other bone-related problems. Unfortunately, many doctors provide a low-fat, high-fiber diet and a calcium supplement for those with osteoporosis but the calcium isn???t being absorbed anyway because the phytates block its uptake.

Also check out this: http://www.naturalnews.com/031696_phytic_acid_whole_grains.html

Medium avatar

(10611)

on June 27, 2013
at 10:37 PM

Most grains today have their bran removed, which eliminates most of the small amount of phytic acid the whole grains contain (0.05-0.10%).

Medium avatar

(10611)

on July 12, 2013
at 01:14 AM

+1 for realizing that adding bran to the diet will chelate calcium added to the diet. An odd strategy for reducing osteoporosis.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!