4

votes

WGA - does it survive baking?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created December 06, 2011 at 6:22 PM

A lot has been mentioned about the harmful effects of WGA, a great series by That Paleo Guy, and many studies suggesting it is harmful for everyone and not just celiac patients.

This study was mentioned by Mat Lalonde at AHS,

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S095671350300104X

and shows the WGA to be undetectable in pasta after cooking. I haven't been able to find anything to show whether or not the WGA survives the bread making process.

If it is present in bread, this is such a good selling point for why everyone (and not just gluten intolerant people) should avoid bread.

If it is destroyed by all cooking methods we may need to re-think some arguments.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 21, 2011
at 03:52 AM

Definitely no more bread for me! The funny thing is I had one piece of Walker's buttery shortbread last night and the only reaction was a stuffy nose. Do you think it's because there's no yeast?

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on December 21, 2011
at 03:44 AM

Oh no! I was hoping this experiment would be a grand success for you, Nance. :/

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on December 20, 2011
at 07:26 PM

It's a shame it didn't work out for you!

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 09, 2011
at 04:47 PM

He doesn't really talk about cooking or sprouting in that article. Also, he bends the truth at times, like saying "Anti-WGA antibodies in human sera have been shown to cross-react with other proteins, indicating that they may contribute to autoimmunity." The actual research that he cites says "Although the anti-WGA antibodies were highly specific for WGA, they also crossreacted slightly toward some other proteins."

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on December 06, 2011
at 08:04 PM

http://towncenterwellness.com/announcements/dangers-of-wheat-germ-agglutinin-wga/ Seems its not removed by cooking or sprouting.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 06, 2011
at 07:18 PM

I won't yell! Heck, I eat rice ;) lol

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 06, 2011
at 06:48 PM

okay, any proof? I would have guessed it survived boiling but that study shows it doesn't. Baking temps can be much higher than boiling.

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3 Answers

1
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 06, 2011
at 07:10 PM

I don't have the answer, but I'm very interested in this conversation as I just made my first loaf of bread that's acting "safe" so far. Before you all start yelling at me, this is a planned holiday treat and I don't plan to eat it on a regular basis.

I used water kefir to make a from-scratch sourdough starter, took 3 days to build it up to dough then refrigerated the dough for over a day before rising/baking. It's a combination of a water-kefir-sourdough recipe and a slow-rise sourdough recipe that's supposed to kill most of the gluten.

I had a test slice last night with butter
I ate 2 eggs on toast for breakfast
My partially-SAD grandson pronounced it good bread and asked me not to make it too often because he doesn't want to be tempted. :-))

NO SYMPTOMS SO FAR! Even without symptoms, I will only make it once or twice more between now and New Years and then I'll go back to the no-bread rule until at least Easter. But it would be nice to have a "cheat" that carries no penalties, wouldn't it?

FINAL EDIT! No, this didn't work. Shortly after I typed the other edit, I noticed my face was flushed and my hands and face had mild swelling. I took my BP and it was high enough to alarm me although a nurse friend said it wasn't high enough to alarm her. No more slow-rise sourdough for me!

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 06, 2011
at 07:18 PM

I won't yell! Heck, I eat rice ;) lol

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on December 21, 2011
at 03:52 AM

Definitely no more bread for me! The funny thing is I had one piece of Walker's buttery shortbread last night and the only reaction was a stuffy nose. Do you think it's because there's no yeast?

Fb67dc30cead043d1d13ea503a3044dc

(3280)

on December 21, 2011
at 03:44 AM

Oh no! I was hoping this experiment would be a grand success for you, Nance. :/

7841848bd0c27c64353c583fb7971242

(7275)

on December 20, 2011
at 07:26 PM

It's a shame it didn't work out for you!

0
2163280ace0d40b8dc64947afcbfcb15

(100)

on December 06, 2011
at 06:51 PM

Let's see... both are ~flour, water, salt both are kneaded but bread is leavened with yeast, which is allowed to multiply wildly

could that cause a difference in WGA presence?

0
C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on December 06, 2011
at 06:40 PM

From what I understand, Yes it does survive.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on December 06, 2011
at 08:04 PM

http://towncenterwellness.com/announcements/dangers-of-wheat-germ-agglutinin-wga/ Seems its not removed by cooking or sprouting.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 06, 2011
at 06:48 PM

okay, any proof? I would have guessed it survived boiling but that study shows it doesn't. Baking temps can be much higher than boiling.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on December 09, 2011
at 04:47 PM

He doesn't really talk about cooking or sprouting in that article. Also, he bends the truth at times, like saying "Anti-WGA antibodies in human sera have been shown to cross-react with other proteins, indicating that they may contribute to autoimmunity." The actual research that he cites says "Although the anti-WGA antibodies were highly specific for WGA, they also crossreacted slightly toward some other proteins."

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