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Diet For Longevity

Commented on September 13, 2014
Created September 10, 2014 at 3:37 PM

The purpose of my diet is for longevity and to feel good. I eat the same thing every day. Can I rearrange the diet in any way to make it better? Am I missing any unique nutrients? Anything else?

 

Meal 1

Raw unsalted cashews (1-2 servings)

Half a canteloupe

Dried berry mix (blueberries, various raisins, cranberries, etc)

 

Meal 2

Canned pink salmon (7.5 ounces, no salt added, skin and bones included)

Sweet potato

1/4 of a watermelon

 

Meal 3

Avocado

Small white potato

1-2 mangoes

 

Meal 4

1-2 servings of coconut

2 bananas

Dried berry mix (same as above)

 

-I start off each meal with at least 20 grams of fat to control blood sugar and increase absorption of fat soluble nutrients. Plus the fat food is different in each meal to get different nutritious fats.

 

-All fruit that I eat the skin of is organic. 

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on September 13, 2014
at 10:23 PM

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5 Answers

1
Medium avatar

on September 13, 2014
at 10:22 PM

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1
Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on September 10, 2014
at 04:25 PM

Longevity?

1-Eating too often is detrimental to longevity. Longer time elapsed between meals leads to lower IGF-1 and insulin levels. The opposite of what you are doing.

2-Too much fruit (1-3 servings with each meal), you're consuming a lot of sugar. Not good for longevity.

3-Too high in carbs, probably leading to elevated insulin levels throughout the entire day, not good for longevity.

4-Not enough variety. Putting all your eggs in one basket is never a good idea, switch up your foods every now and then.

5-Canned salmon is the only meat you consume? No sardines? No oysters/mussels/clams/scallops/calamari/shrimp/etc? No eggs? Wow.

6-Could use more healthy fat, especially olive oil. Also, your diet literally has zero non-starchy or leafy vegetables. Definitely not a good diet for longevity.

I would recommend you modify your diet, it's not healthy.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on September 10, 2014
at 06:48 PM

I appears to lack variety, but nutritional bases are covered (except for Ca). Cutting half (or more) the fruit for leafy greens, tubers and olive oil would help. 

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on September 11, 2014
at 01:31 PM

I agree with you I don't think the diet presented here is necessarily lacking in any nutrient (I actually think Calcium is probably really high if the canned salmon comes with bones, like the one I buy) so in that sense it is probably complete. But the artificial limits imposed here seem totally unnecessary. Even if the OP is a pescetarian, then there's a million choices of seafood to eat out there besides salmon. But what boggles mind is, why no leafy vegetables? It just seems unsustainable and boring in the long term, you know.

6142ab143aab4e271e1e8f6f30c069e1

on September 11, 2014
at 02:11 PM

The Gastronomer:

"Eating too often is detrimental to longevity. Longer time elapsed between meals leads to lower IGF-1 and insulin levels."

I'll look into the effect on IGF-1 and insulin levels. How many meals are you suggesting? And wouldn't spacing out the meals make it harder to control blood sugar?

 "Too much fruit (1-3 servings with each meal), you're consuming a lot of sugar." And:"Too high in carbs, probably leading to elevated insulin levels throughout the entire day."

I never thought I'd be told I eat too much fruit. Just kidding.

Something I should've mentioned in the original post is that I have a high level of physical activity every day. Sprints, weight lifting, hiking, biking, and walking. Knowing this, do you still think my carbs/sugar are too high?

"Not enough variety."

Is this a health concern or you just think it could get boring? Personally I've had this diet for the past couple of years without much change and it works for me. Not bored.

"Canned salmon is the only meat you consume?"

Is this a health concern or are you just surprised I'm not sick of salmon yet?

"Could use more healthy fat, especially olive oil."

You're right. The only whole food fat I'm missing are olives, but that's only because I hate the taste of them. I don't eat oil -only whole foods- because I avoid processed, isolated nutrients.

"Also, your diet literally has zero non-starchy or leafy vegetables."

Yeah I've noticed that too. The reason being is that because my physical activity level is high it's really hard for me to maintain my weight even with hardly any vegetables (I do have a bit every few days). If I added in vegetables each day then it would be even harder. I basically had the choice of more physical activity or eat vegetables, and I think it's more beneficial to exercise.

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on September 11, 2014
at 06:46 PM

Decreased meal frequency and increased time between meals causes IGF-1 levels to drop, leading to a decrease in cellular replication and protein synthesis, a key requirement for extending life. Insulin also drops during the time that you are not eating in order to keep blood glucose stable. There is a huge misconception about having to eat frquently to "maintain blood glucose levels", this is a classic fallacy believed by people who have a naive understanding of the control systems incolved in blood glucose regulation in the human body.

The pancreas contains alpha-cells (for glucagon) and beta-cells (for insulin). When you eat something with glucose, beta-cells release insulin and glucose goes down (negative feedback) and as glucose comes down less insulin is needed so the beta cells make less of it, until an equilibrium level is reached (steady-state). So eventually glucose levels come back to normal after insulin shuttles the glucose into the cells. If glucose starts getting low, then the alpha cells release glucagon which promotes gluconeogenesis and thereby increases blood glucose levels (another negative feedback loop) back to normal, the higher the glucose level goes the less glucagon is released, once again reaching a balance. Contrary to conventional wisdom, the body is perfectly capable of regulating blood glucose levels and the benefits of fasting and calorie reduction come precisely from the reduced insulin load necessary to maintain homeostasis (balance) of blood glucose levels, as insulin and IGF-1 are implicated in advanced aging universally in all animal models in which they have been studied.

You would benefit more from eating less than from exercising more. Once again, athletic performance does not equal longevity. ALL of the world's longest living centenarians have been women (not remarkably athletic or muscular), not men, so clearly athletic prowess has little to do with longevity. If you had to chose a diet for longevity it should be one that involved some caloric (mainly carbohydrate since this elevates insulin most) and protein (elevates IGF-1) restriction along with some occasional fasting and a moderate level of exercise. And eating vegetables would be more favorable to longevity than eating more sugar just to exercise more.

And finally just to touch on some final points, consuming olive oil is perfectly healthy and should not be avoided, specially over a trivial ideological reason like not being a "whole food". Not eating vegetables because you exercise defeats the purpose of doing exercise in the first place, so do less exercise and eat more veggies. 

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on September 11, 2014
at 06:57 PM

By the way, pardon the bad spelling in the previous post, the spell-check feature isn't working and I can't edit my posts.

6142ab143aab4e271e1e8f6f30c069e1

on September 12, 2014
at 02:41 PM

I found five studies (listed below) showing the effect of meal frequency on insulin. All five showed a decrease in insulin with increased meal frequency. They compared 17 snacks vs 3 meals, 13 snacks vs 3 meals, 6 meals vs 2 meals, 9 snacks to 3 meals, and 6 meals vs 3 meals. Were the study designs not what you had in mind?

Nibbling versus gorging: metabolic advantages of increased meal frequency

Metabolic advantages of spreading the nutrient load: effects of increased meal frequency

Effect of meal frequency on blood glucose, insulin, and free fatty acids

Effects of nibbling and gorging on lipid profiles, blood glucose, and insulin

Meal frequency effects on plasma hormone concentrations and cholesterol synthesis in humans

"And finally just to touch on some final points, consuming olive oil is perfectly healthy and should not be avoided, specially over a trivial ideological reason like not being a "whole food"."

I think it makes sense to eat only whole foods and not for trivial ideological reasons.

1. Nutrients have a synergistic effect when all together in a whole food. Isolating nutrients will reduce this effect.

2. Eating whole foods prevents too high of intake of nutrients. By isolating a nutrient it makes it pretty easy to have more of it than can be done by eating the whole food.

3. The body handles whole foods better than isolated nutrients. In nature, olive oil is eaten only with the whole food. That's what the body is expecting. Isolating nutrients increases the risk that the body can't handle it properly.

4. Specifically for oils, they go rancid much more easily when isolated.

I think it's pretty risky having olive oil or any isolated nutrient. 

Be157308a0438e382b88d9db4c12ab30

on September 12, 2014
at 05:54 PM

The studies you provided were very small, a study with only 7-11 participants for one or two days does not make a very good source, but I get your point on the insulin issue. Nothing there about IGF-1 though, you should look that up.

1. No one said to eat olive oil by itself. Olive oil with a salad or vegetables for example which would include the nutrients from olive oil and the nutrients from the vegetables (Vitamin A, Vitamin K, Vitamin E, etc) is better absorbed when eaten with olive oil than just salad by itself since these vitamins are fat-soluble, so your first argument against olive oil contradicts itself, unless you thought I was saying olive oil should be eaten by itself, which I never did.

2. "Eating whole foods prevents high intake of nutrients" this statement is completely false. For example liver (a whole food) can cause hypervitaminosis A which can lead to death, specially when liver from large mammals are consumed. Bitter almonds are a whole food, which can lead to cyanide poisoning. Rice is a whole food and one could easily consume 3000 calories of it; sumo wrestlers actually use it as their main source of calories for fattening up. Whole foods are not better than processed foods just because they're "whole".  Besides, olive oil is a whole food, since it is simply the juice of the olive fruit.

3. No proof for this statement.

4. Very difficult for olive oil to go rancid if stored properly, since it contains ample amounts of Vitamin E, which acts as a natural antioxidant. Besides Olive oil is about 90%+ saturated and monounsaturated fat and only about 10% polyunsaturated. In comparison, lard has 15% polyunsaturated fat which is even more than olive oil. Saturated and monounsaturated fats do not go rancid very easily.

Do what you like but remember you asked for our thoughts and advice, if you think you know better than us, then you have no need to ask.

0
E23363d46a6308c0990b478ac31d5eb4

on September 12, 2014
at 11:58 AM

Not Sure that fruits tend to be or are not correlated along with longevity. In the Blue Area book, both people from Barbagia and individuals from Costa Rica eat a lot associated with fruits.

0
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on September 10, 2014
at 10:11 PM

PS. I would add steaks, liver, natto, olive oil, egg yolks, and a rotation of steamed greens (collard and chard for sure, pick anything for third not in the brassica or beta families). Not clear that you are not covering calcium either, if it is true that Ca/Mg can not exceed 2, you are just about the only poster here who is respecting that limit.

6142ab143aab4e271e1e8f6f30c069e1

on September 11, 2014
at 02:55 PM

glib:

"I would add steaks, liver, natto, olive oil, egg yolks, and a rotation of steamed greens."

I don't want to take my chances with domesticated animal products and I've never found inexpensive game meat. With eggs, it's just too hard to tell for certain what the animal's diet, living conditions, etc are. I simplify this and go with the odds, and only go with wild salmon.

Does natto fit into your version of paleo?

"Not clear that you are not covering calcium either, if it is true that Ca/Mg can not exceed 2, you are just about the only poster here who is respecting that limit."

I get about 700 mg of calcium and 700 of magnesium. So a 1:1 ratio. I've never heard anything about the importance of that ratio though. Do you have any more information?

 

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on September 11, 2014
at 03:29 PM

yes, natto is a fermented food, and if you make your own, you can ferment just about any pulse with similar results. The K2 content of regular foods is very low, and it is not tracked by sites like cronometer. Natto gives you that, plus other things. I only eat it every second breakfast, and I always dress it with olive oil (for taste, but also for improved absorption).

I use the same two providers (mostly) for meat since 2006. I have been there many times and I am fairly confident of the way those animals live.

In regard to Ca/Mg. you can find a lot on google, including the original papers. Ca and Mg in the same column of the Mendeleev table, so the chemistry is  the same. The body can not do much if they are out of balance, because distilling or trapping one (chemically) will inevitably get the other too. Pre-paleo Ca/Mg levels were 1/1, but they increased during paleo times as people started eating more bones. Nowadays they are through the roof. 

 

0
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on September 10, 2014
at 10:07 PM

not clear that fruits are or are not correlated with longevity. In the Blue Zone book, both people from Barbagia and people from Costa Rica eat a lot of fruits. High fruits usually means low lectins, low oxalates, low psoralens, low phytates.

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