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Why is the weight not what is labeled? Kirkland Signature Organic Ground Beef Item #59881 from Costco

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 21, 2013 at 9:20 PM

I just purchased the 3 pak of the organic ground beef. The label reads 21.44ozs. per pak. When I weighed each pak the weight was only 19.5 ozs. That is 5.8 ozs. short for the entire 3 paks. At $13.99/# the customer is shorted $1.26. How can Costco get away with that and why isn't someone regulating the packaging???

Maybe a former customer.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 22, 2013
at 02:50 PM

In MA, I pay about $2 less per pound for ground beef -- $5.50 instead of $7-$10 -- for pastured beef I buy from the local farm at their farm stand, instead of prepackaged organic (and pastured) beef from the grocery store.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on May 22, 2013
at 02:37 PM

I also notice that the price per pound is literally double what I pay for grass-fed, pastured, antibiotic-free beef. Those properties are more important to me nutritionally and ethically than the feed being strictly organic. Don't know if the pricing is the same elsewhere in the country, though -- I'm in the bay area, which has high availability of fancy beef although it also has higher food prices than nearly any city in the continental US...

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on May 22, 2013
at 02:33 PM

Thanks! I'd never heard this before, but perhaps knowing it will one day stop me from driving myself crazy in circumstances similar to the OP's.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on May 22, 2013
at 02:26 PM

+1 excellent point. tl;dr If you have the space, get a deep freezer and buy half a cow, quarter cow, or whatever you can afford. Granted, organic is better than plain CAFO, but in the end, it just means the cattle ate organic soy, corn, etc. Not ideal by any stretch, just eliminates antibiotics and pesticide residues. Plus it still comes from multiple cows and is ground, so higher possibility of bacterial infestation.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 22, 2013
at 12:46 PM

Yeah, it's funny @Matt - now that I reread the question, it reads like @Ken thinks this is a Costco support forum.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on May 22, 2013
at 11:17 AM

Not a paleo question.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 22, 2013
at 12:38 AM

It's "common knowledge" (incorrect knowledge) that an ounce is 30g. You'll even see it on food labeling (where they show US and metric) as often as 28g.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on May 21, 2013
at 10:19 PM

Are there really consumer scales that equate 30g to 1oz? That's so far outside the margin of error it's insulting.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 21, 2013
at 09:55 PM

I added info to the question title so other's would know what the questions was actually about. :-)

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2 Answers

2
Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 21, 2013
at 09:53 PM

Let me guess, this package was labeled something like 600 grams?

Your scale is calibrated to equate 30g to equal 1 ounce. This is incorrect, although very common. 600/30 = 20, which is about what you weighed. (I'd ignore the 1/2 ounce difference unless you have a very, precise scale).

An ounce is 28.3495231 grams. This is sometimes rounded up to 29 or 30, or down to 28. All of them are imprecise.

If you divide 600 / 28 you get 21.42, which is about what they labeled.

Summary: the US needs to start using metric and join the modern era!

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on May 21, 2013
at 10:19 PM

Are there really consumer scales that equate 30g to 1oz? That's so far outside the margin of error it's insulting.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 22, 2013
at 12:38 AM

It's "common knowledge" (incorrect knowledge) that an ounce is 30g. You'll even see it on food labeling (where they show US and metric) as often as 28g.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on May 22, 2013
at 02:33 PM

Thanks! I'd never heard this before, but perhaps knowing it will one day stop me from driving myself crazy in circumstances similar to the OP's.

1
00cd3b6f51530a6832fcda1712edbec3

(2411)

on May 22, 2013
at 04:49 AM

I think that a more pertinent question is why buy organic beef if it's not also pasture-raised, which no Costco beef is? Organic certification still permits ranchers to feed the cows grain, which is bad for the cow and you.

72cf727474b8bf815fdc505e58cadfea

on May 22, 2013
at 02:37 PM

I also notice that the price per pound is literally double what I pay for grass-fed, pastured, antibiotic-free beef. Those properties are more important to me nutritionally and ethically than the feed being strictly organic. Don't know if the pricing is the same elsewhere in the country, though -- I'm in the bay area, which has high availability of fancy beef although it also has higher food prices than nearly any city in the continental US...

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on May 22, 2013
at 02:50 PM

In MA, I pay about $2 less per pound for ground beef -- $5.50 instead of $7-$10 -- for pastured beef I buy from the local farm at their farm stand, instead of prepackaged organic (and pastured) beef from the grocery store.

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on May 22, 2013
at 02:26 PM

+1 excellent point. tl;dr If you have the space, get a deep freezer and buy half a cow, quarter cow, or whatever you can afford. Granted, organic is better than plain CAFO, but in the end, it just means the cattle ate organic soy, corn, etc. Not ideal by any stretch, just eliminates antibiotics and pesticide residues. Plus it still comes from multiple cows and is ground, so higher possibility of bacterial infestation.

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