6

votes

Question for those with a history of disordered eating-What steps have you taken to maintain a healthy attitude towards food and your weight?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created May 29, 2012 at 11:29 PM

This is a question for everyone (female AND male) who has a history of disordered eating (starvation, binges, obsessive calorie counting, etc). What steps (besides going paleo, of course) have you taken to resolve the issue? For me, it's been a combination of things..not weighing myself daily, exercising for the way it makes me feel, not the way it makes me look. Basically, I'm looking for other ideas to help me (and others) maintain this new, healthy attitude.

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on June 03, 2012
at 04:12 AM

I do see how this can be beneficial to a binge-purge eating disorder, or even just binge. This is definitely a journey different for everyone and if something works for you, stick with it! I'm glad you've found your niche!

Medium avatar

(19479)

on June 01, 2012
at 05:52 PM

Big upvote for Yoga! It was an integral part of my healing process (along with tai chi and meditation) and I think that there is much to be said for rebuilding the "mind-body" connection!

6747a5447a3440b5c87ebf5f2c1e0ead

(231)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:30 PM

Thanks everyone for sharing your very personal experiences. If I could upvote you twice, I would :)

6747a5447a3440b5c87ebf5f2c1e0ead

(231)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:28 PM

"I know that 40 years of SAD and 32 years of an eating disorder will take more than a month to overcome." +1! I don't think we should force ourselves to work within deadlines, just do the best we can, at a pace we are comfortable with.

6747a5447a3440b5c87ebf5f2c1e0ead

(231)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:23 PM

Your entire list is brilliant, especially the last two. I think a lot of people forget just how much of an effect inner emotional/mental state has on these types of behaviours. A lot of the time, it's not even about the food, or exercise or even appearance. It can totally be triggered by something else, like negative feelings about another aspect of your life. I struggle with it everyday so it's really nice to hear that other people have taken positive steps and are doing well.

6747a5447a3440b5c87ebf5f2c1e0ead

(231)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:18 PM

Thank you for your very specific, concrete recs. I think you make a good point about IF, it just doesn't work for everyone. I know for me, it carries the danger of making me think that gnawing feeling in my stomach is something to be proud of. Ditto for the calorie counting. I think I'm going to stay off FitDay for a while since I know I'm getting enough to eat anyway (based on how I feel).

6747a5447a3440b5c87ebf5f2c1e0ead

(231)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:16 PM

Thanks so much for sharing. You're totally right that these things can't be taught and need to be practiced. That's the part I've been struggling with as well. To be honest, I got a little emotional when I read your comment about forgiving yourself. Thanks again for opening up and sharing. Your answer is really helpful to people like me (and others) who are struggling with residual unhealthy bad habits and thought patterns.

5e63e3fa78e998736106a4a5b9aef58c

on May 30, 2012
at 07:31 PM

@DesireeBU: I honestly don't care if what I do fits anyone else's idea of "true recovery" (whatever the hell *that* is). I eat nourishing food that satisfies. I eat just enough, but not more. I walk by my old binge foods in the supermarket and nothing hops off the shelf into my cart. I don't want the junk food in the breakroom anymore. I don't eat anything I didn't intend to eat. My life used to be run by my obsession with food and inability to control myself around it; not any more. Do my methods count as "recovery" or mere "management"? Don't know, don't care--this is working for me.

5e63e3fa78e998736106a4a5b9aef58c

on May 30, 2012
at 07:14 PM

@mzrdnan: Tomorrow is my cheat day, and I can't think of anything I want to indulge in. I'll probably stick to my normal schedule again, as I've done for the last three weeks. Honestly, if this is a "problem with food," I'll gladly take it over the hell that used to be my life.

5e63e3fa78e998736106a4a5b9aef58c

on May 30, 2012
at 07:07 PM

@mzrdnan: That big "binge" was also the first cheat day I ever allowed myself. I ate a lot of junk on the second one, too. But subsequent ones have been far less indulgent, for the simple fact that I feel like utter crap the next day. I feel like such crap, I don't want to eat anything. So I fast as a "reset," giving my body a break. It's not difficult; I'm not starving; I don't have to force myself to do it. And being able to fast that long has actually improved my relationship with my body in ways I never anticipated. (cont'd)

5e63e3fa78e998736106a4a5b9aef58c

on May 30, 2012
at 06:54 PM

@mzrdnan: You see the cheat day and the 40-hour post-cheat fast as "binge and purge" behavior, but it's not. The cheat day is how I manage any cravings that still pop up. Forbid eating something? I crave it more. Postpone eating it until later in the week? I quickly forget about it. And I intentionally chose the busiest day of my week as cheat day because it forces me to space out snacks and meals. So far, on my biggest ever cheat day? I ate three slices of pizza, a brownie, two Reese's Peanut Butter Cups, and a cheese Danish. For the entire day. Yeah, such a binge! (cont'd)

5e63e3fa78e998736106a4a5b9aef58c

on May 30, 2012
at 06:40 PM

@mzrdnan: After years of looking at the emotional roots of my disordered eating, and seeing no improvement in my actual eating behaviors, I'm done with the woo-woo "nourish my soul" approach to dealing with it. My problem was a profound lack of control and awareness surrounding food and eating, combined with sugar/carb addiction. So I'm now taking a dietary, and behavioral approach of my own devising. And hey, guess what--it's working. I am getting the exact results I hoped for. (cont'd)

3b3a449b6705e9ec8b141d0bd07c1a64

(1489)

on May 30, 2012
at 04:31 PM

Accepting myself as I am. I am more than a number. I am more than what I eat. I have stopped weighing myself and counting calories.----THIS!

3b3a449b6705e9ec8b141d0bd07c1a64

(1489)

on May 30, 2012
at 04:28 PM

Fasting for 40 hours after a cheat? That sounds like starving yourself for doing something wrong. You should eat cheat foods to nourish your soul if you wish to do so. Not to binge and starve. If it's the food you like to enjoy with people than it's fulfilling another part of who you are, apart from using food for fuel, you're using it for fun, but the fact that you alter otherwise normal routine around "cheating" suggest perhaps you still have a problem with food.

3b3a449b6705e9ec8b141d0bd07c1a64

(1489)

on May 30, 2012
at 04:25 PM

wow good on you from growing from it all! I'm sorry about your past, but you're helping yourself now :) it's really great

5d4b57e05d74826020d1eb083ef725e0

(85)

on May 30, 2012
at 03:15 PM

Everyone's recovery is definitely unique. The above is similar to the method I've used for the last few months. After some recent introspection, PERSONALLY, I'm not sure that it's really recovery (again - FOR ME.) It's definitely my best option at the moment - AND I'm improving - however I think now it's likely all the additional "rules" of fasting/cheat days etc are more management and less true recovery. If you're only actually recovered when you have a healthy relationship with eating..then abiding stringent rules is honestly still using food as control.

C471216c9fb4fcf886b7ac84a4046b49

(1371)

on May 30, 2012
at 04:04 AM

true that...accept and forgive

1096aa84d006fe967128ffbd37e8070e

(1002)

on May 30, 2012
at 03:32 AM

yes, latergator, I wonder the same thing. I used to be anorexic and just started IFing. This afternoon, I noticed how much I was enjoying that hungry feeling, and I could see myself not wanting to eat at all after a while. It feels like a slippery slope...

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on May 30, 2012
at 02:25 AM

+1. Great response. I have real bingeing problem and have almost the exact same strategy as you outlined. Only eat from 12pm to 8pm. I don't have planned cheat days, but I usually do fast full day after I fall off the wagon.

93eea7754e6e94b6085dbabbb48c0bb7

on May 30, 2012
at 02:20 AM

IF I think has helped me as well. But if you are a bit compulsive this restrictiveness could 'eff things up even more.

5e63e3fa78e998736106a4a5b9aef58c

on May 30, 2012
at 01:57 AM

I think it depends on the individual and their particular eating disorder. Given the way my own disordered eating manifested, imposing strict rules and boundaries regarding what I could eat and when I could eat it has made all the difference. But there's no way I would recommend it to an anorexic, or anyone else whose ED was all about imposing strict limits and exerting destructive levels of self-control.

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on May 30, 2012
at 01:43 AM

I worry that intermittent fasting is just a way of making someone with an eating disorder feel okay with starving themselves, even though it's temporary. "It's healthy!" I may be wrong, just a personal concern.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on May 30, 2012
at 01:29 AM

Thanks for sharing, it's good to hear that this is something that affects both men and women alike.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 30, 2012
at 12:29 AM

Good stuff, man.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 30, 2012
at 12:17 AM

Also, be really patient and forgive yourself for all the horribly disgusting and shameful things you did. That was really hard for me and I felt guilty for years. But really, it's not worth it.

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8 Answers

8
01eb62476756ea980bf8fc048179d4bc

(374)

on May 30, 2012
at 12:50 AM

There have been a lot of factors in my recovery, but the most significant are:

1) No calorie counting, whatsoever! I'm convinced that calorie counting actually led to my eating disorder in the first place. Even though I was not overweight, I decided that I needed to stick within the parameters of some silly iphone app, which led to OCD, restricting, guilt, exercise bulimia, etc., you know the deal. Sometimes I still catch myself doing the math in my head, but I know I have to avoid that. Now I listen to my body's hunger signals and they have not led me astray!

2) Yoga. Practicing yoga has made me feel a lot more comfortable in my own body and helps (I don't know how but it really does so I don't question it) with body image. It's great for building strength of the body, mind, and spirit (I know this is cheesy) and it is not a form of exercise that I will abuse. Along with this goes 3) meditation.

4) Getting enough fat and protein. If I eat enough of these macros (I don't restrict carbs, as I don't restrict anything as a rule, but I don't eat a ton of them) then I don't get the kind of nagging hunger that could lead me to binge.

5) Eating when I'm hungry. I do not mess with IF; I really don't think anyone with an ED background should, but that's just my opinion. When I'm hungry, at all, I eat a meal. I think the feeling of hunger itself can be very triggering with someone with an ED; either triggering to restrict or to binge. Thus, I avoid it when I can. I think IF can be healthy for most people, but not for me, and that is okay!

6747a5447a3440b5c87ebf5f2c1e0ead

(231)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:18 PM

Thank you for your very specific, concrete recs. I think you make a good point about IF, it just doesn't work for everyone. I know for me, it carries the danger of making me think that gnawing feeling in my stomach is something to be proud of. Ditto for the calorie counting. I think I'm going to stay off FitDay for a while since I know I'm getting enough to eat anyway (based on how I feel).

Medium avatar

(19479)

on June 01, 2012
at 05:52 PM

Big upvote for Yoga! It was an integral part of my healing process (along with tai chi and meditation) and I think that there is much to be said for rebuilding the "mind-body" connection!

7
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on May 30, 2012
at 12:13 AM

I was horribly anorexic for a few years beginning at the age of 12. By far the most important thing in the short run was getting professional help and going into treatment. In the long run it was this viewing food as nourishment and not poison, and learning to trust my body. Neither of these things can be taught, but only practiced. For instance, I was made to eat 1 food that I was afraid 3x per week when in treatment (exposure therapy). I still remember the first time this happened and sitting at the table for what seemed like eternity with a melting ice cream cone that had to be put into a dish to prevent it from dripping all over the floor. The reason I took so long to eat it was because I was savoring it, it tasted so good! Eventually after more of these things past I found that nothing really bad happened and I grew more confident.

Also, exercising with a purpose other than using up food and losing weight. That helped too.

You have to treat it like you would an addiction, because the brain psychology of eating disorders is essentially the same as those who are druggies.

Oh, and I never weigh myself routinely anymore. Only really at the docs office when I go in for checkups.

Also, I'm not perfectly over it, obviously by hanging on these forums, but I'm at a healthy enough spot where i'm not underweight and it does not interfere with my social life or ability to perform athletically or academically.

Medium avatar

(19479)

on May 30, 2012
at 01:29 AM

Thanks for sharing, it's good to hear that this is something that affects both men and women alike.

C471216c9fb4fcf886b7ac84a4046b49

(1371)

on May 30, 2012
at 04:04 AM

true that...accept and forgive

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 30, 2012
at 12:17 AM

Also, be really patient and forgive yourself for all the horribly disgusting and shameful things you did. That was really hard for me and I felt guilty for years. But really, it's not worth it.

3b3a449b6705e9ec8b141d0bd07c1a64

(1489)

on May 30, 2012
at 04:25 PM

wow good on you from growing from it all! I'm sorry about your past, but you're helping yourself now :) it's really great

6747a5447a3440b5c87ebf5f2c1e0ead

(231)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:16 PM

Thanks so much for sharing. You're totally right that these things can't be taught and need to be practiced. That's the part I've been struggling with as well. To be honest, I got a little emotional when I read your comment about forgiving yourself. Thanks again for opening up and sharing. Your answer is really helpful to people like me (and others) who are struggling with residual unhealthy bad habits and thought patterns.

6
5e63e3fa78e998736106a4a5b9aef58c

on May 30, 2012
at 12:55 AM

I used to binge, and on top of that have always been a chronic "nervous snacker." I'd eat for no reason at all, just because food was there, even if it was cruddy food I didn't really like.

[ETA: I now recall standing in the break room at a long-ago office job one evening, eating the remains of a lunchtime tray of sandwiches that nobody had yet bothered to throw out. They were soggy, didn't have mayo or mustard on them, and all the ones with good fillings had long since been eaten. Some had the meat picked out, and were just bread and iceberg lettuce. But I stood there and finished off everything on the tray, even though I wasn't hungry. They were there, so I ate them. So I guess I've been kind of like the human Roomba, just rolling and bumping along, sucking up every stray crumb without a second thought.]

My last true binge was a couple of years ago; the binges had been growing more infrequent for about a decade as I gradually got my mental health together and my life circumstances improved. But the constant, mindless snacking persisted. Even on low-carb, no grains, no sugar I still couldn't pass through the kitchen without opening the fridge and grabbing another hunk of leftover meat, or another hard-boiled egg. I'd grab fistfuls of nuts and be halfway back upstairs before I realized I was even eating them. And while I wasn't gaining any more weight, I wasn't losing any, either.

On top of that, I was still craving sugary/carby crapfood every so often. I resisted temptation, but it was still there, nagging at me.

Intermittent fasting turned out to be the thing that did the trick. I can only eat between 6:00 PM and midnight--period. Other than black coffee and water, I consume nothing else during the remaining 18 hours of my day. So when I'm in the kitchen at noon and reaching for the jar of cashews? I now remind myself that they'll still be there later, after six, when I'm allowed to eat.

As far as the crapfood cravings, I allow myself a cheat day on Thursday, when I can eat things like pizza or brownies or cake all day, in any quantities I like. If I do cheat, Friday is a fast day (I do a 40-hour fast from midnight Fri. to 6:00PM Sat.). If I don't cheat, I stick to my usual 18/6 IF routine.

During the week, when a craving hits, the idea of the cheat day has been a big help--postponing fulfillment of the craving until later is psychologically easier than forbidding that food outright. But as time has gone by and I've indulged on a few cheat days, I have far fewer cravings. The last three weeks, I haven't bothered to cheat at all. And that's because I feel so incredibly lousy the following morning that the cheat is nowhere near so appealing as it once was. I look at a pizza or a hunk of chocolate cake and can now anticipate the hangover I'm going to wake up to the following morning. I can't pretend there's no link between those foods and feeling like warmed-over shit. So if I'm going to cheat? It has to be something really good, that's worth the suffering--and funny how almost nothing is anymore.

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on May 30, 2012
at 01:43 AM

I worry that intermittent fasting is just a way of making someone with an eating disorder feel okay with starving themselves, even though it's temporary. "It's healthy!" I may be wrong, just a personal concern.

1096aa84d006fe967128ffbd37e8070e

(1002)

on May 30, 2012
at 03:32 AM

yes, latergator, I wonder the same thing. I used to be anorexic and just started IFing. This afternoon, I noticed how much I was enjoying that hungry feeling, and I could see myself not wanting to eat at all after a while. It feels like a slippery slope...

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on May 30, 2012
at 02:25 AM

+1. Great response. I have real bingeing problem and have almost the exact same strategy as you outlined. Only eat from 12pm to 8pm. I don't have planned cheat days, but I usually do fast full day after I fall off the wagon.

5e63e3fa78e998736106a4a5b9aef58c

on May 30, 2012
at 06:54 PM

@mzrdnan: You see the cheat day and the 40-hour post-cheat fast as "binge and purge" behavior, but it's not. The cheat day is how I manage any cravings that still pop up. Forbid eating something? I crave it more. Postpone eating it until later in the week? I quickly forget about it. And I intentionally chose the busiest day of my week as cheat day because it forces me to space out snacks and meals. So far, on my biggest ever cheat day? I ate three slices of pizza, a brownie, two Reese's Peanut Butter Cups, and a cheese Danish. For the entire day. Yeah, such a binge! (cont'd)

5e63e3fa78e998736106a4a5b9aef58c

on May 30, 2012
at 01:57 AM

I think it depends on the individual and their particular eating disorder. Given the way my own disordered eating manifested, imposing strict rules and boundaries regarding what I could eat and when I could eat it has made all the difference. But there's no way I would recommend it to an anorexic, or anyone else whose ED was all about imposing strict limits and exerting destructive levels of self-control.

5e63e3fa78e998736106a4a5b9aef58c

on May 30, 2012
at 06:40 PM

@mzrdnan: After years of looking at the emotional roots of my disordered eating, and seeing no improvement in my actual eating behaviors, I'm done with the woo-woo "nourish my soul" approach to dealing with it. My problem was a profound lack of control and awareness surrounding food and eating, combined with sugar/carb addiction. So I'm now taking a dietary, and behavioral approach of my own devising. And hey, guess what--it's working. I am getting the exact results I hoped for. (cont'd)

5e63e3fa78e998736106a4a5b9aef58c

on May 30, 2012
at 07:07 PM

@mzrdnan: That big "binge" was also the first cheat day I ever allowed myself. I ate a lot of junk on the second one, too. But subsequent ones have been far less indulgent, for the simple fact that I feel like utter crap the next day. I feel like such crap, I don't want to eat anything. So I fast as a "reset," giving my body a break. It's not difficult; I'm not starving; I don't have to force myself to do it. And being able to fast that long has actually improved my relationship with my body in ways I never anticipated. (cont'd)

5e63e3fa78e998736106a4a5b9aef58c

on May 30, 2012
at 07:14 PM

@mzrdnan: Tomorrow is my cheat day, and I can't think of anything I want to indulge in. I'll probably stick to my normal schedule again, as I've done for the last three weeks. Honestly, if this is a "problem with food," I'll gladly take it over the hell that used to be my life.

3b3a449b6705e9ec8b141d0bd07c1a64

(1489)

on May 30, 2012
at 04:28 PM

Fasting for 40 hours after a cheat? That sounds like starving yourself for doing something wrong. You should eat cheat foods to nourish your soul if you wish to do so. Not to binge and starve. If it's the food you like to enjoy with people than it's fulfilling another part of who you are, apart from using food for fuel, you're using it for fun, but the fact that you alter otherwise normal routine around "cheating" suggest perhaps you still have a problem with food.

5d4b57e05d74826020d1eb083ef725e0

(85)

on May 30, 2012
at 03:15 PM

Everyone's recovery is definitely unique. The above is similar to the method I've used for the last few months. After some recent introspection, PERSONALLY, I'm not sure that it's really recovery (again - FOR ME.) It's definitely my best option at the moment - AND I'm improving - however I think now it's likely all the additional "rules" of fasting/cheat days etc are more management and less true recovery. If you're only actually recovered when you have a healthy relationship with eating..then abiding stringent rules is honestly still using food as control.

5e63e3fa78e998736106a4a5b9aef58c

on May 30, 2012
at 07:31 PM

@DesireeBU: I honestly don't care if what I do fits anyone else's idea of "true recovery" (whatever the hell *that* is). I eat nourishing food that satisfies. I eat just enough, but not more. I walk by my old binge foods in the supermarket and nothing hops off the shelf into my cart. I don't want the junk food in the breakroom anymore. I don't eat anything I didn't intend to eat. My life used to be run by my obsession with food and inability to control myself around it; not any more. Do my methods count as "recovery" or mere "management"? Don't know, don't care--this is working for me.

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on June 03, 2012
at 04:12 AM

I do see how this can be beneficial to a binge-purge eating disorder, or even just binge. This is definitely a journey different for everyone and if something works for you, stick with it! I'm glad you've found your niche!

6
Medium avatar

(19479)

on May 29, 2012
at 11:59 PM

A couple things that have helped me as a recovering binge eater/exercise anorexic:

-Weigh myself at most 1x per week

-Treat exercise as a habit like brushing my teeth rather than a punishment for being "bad"

-Focus my diet on foods that have a low potential for abuse (whole foods vs processed junk), but if I do binge and go crazy, forgive myself and move forward as quickly as possible.

-Pay close attention to my mental/emotional state and make a point to do things that help me to manage my stress level in a healthy way (i.e. playing music, writing to-do lists rather than "keeping it in my head", etc.)

-Recognizing that the problem is with the cycle of addiction and behaviors that go along with it and not me as a person. Also, that the underlying drives are valid emotional needs (such as the need for autonomy/control) so I can look for ways to satisfy this need directly (as in addressing my inter-personal relationships) rather than indirectly (avoiding the real issue and "controlling" my emotional state by binging).

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 30, 2012
at 12:29 AM

Good stuff, man.

6747a5447a3440b5c87ebf5f2c1e0ead

(231)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:23 PM

Your entire list is brilliant, especially the last two. I think a lot of people forget just how much of an effect inner emotional/mental state has on these types of behaviours. A lot of the time, it's not even about the food, or exercise or even appearance. It can totally be triggered by something else, like negative feelings about another aspect of your life. I struggle with it everyday so it's really nice to hear that other people have taken positive steps and are doing well.

5
92d67b02a709cad2250f10848f9178e6

on May 30, 2012
at 01:40 AM

Recovering EDNOS here (bulimia, anorexia, binge/purge). Going Paleo has healed me from amenorrhea and excessive hair loss.

Accepting myself as I am. I am more than a number. I am more than what I eat. I have stopped weighing myself and counting calories.

Objectively thinking about the long-term effects of disordered eating (infertility, other health consequences, not being able to reach my full potential, losing social and emotional connections...) I am trying to better my health so I can be the person I am meant to be in hope to benefit others in my lifetime.

Identifying triggers. For me, summer months are the biggest triggers. High-carbohydrate/processed foods are also my trigger foods. I have found that eating strictly Paleo is the least triggering way of eating. I have learned to work around these triggers.

Eating healthy fats. This has helped me with depression, mood swings and anxiety. My eating disorder was the worst when I went on a very low fat diet.

Understanding my body. Learning how much food I need to reach satiety, and how often I should eat. Being too full triggers me to purge. Eating too little makes me obsess with food. Also, understanding when I feel the best (not when I look the best by the society's standard) has helped me.

Forgiving myself.

Trusting my body. I trust my body to tell me when to eat, how much to eat...when to exercise and how much.

Keeping myself busy with work, school and social life.

3b3a449b6705e9ec8b141d0bd07c1a64

(1489)

on May 30, 2012
at 04:31 PM

Accepting myself as I am. I am more than a number. I am more than what I eat. I have stopped weighing myself and counting calories.----THIS!

4
61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on May 30, 2012
at 12:12 AM

I still have a pretty unhealthy relationship with food. Last week, I experienced (and unfortunately everyone around me also experienced) the worst PMS I have had in a very long time. I literally had my head in the cupboard looking for something to stuff in my face, even though I was not hungry, in fact I was still full from supper. Unfortunately I found a jar of Nutella and, two tablespoons later, felt ill for hours.

When I was purging my kitchen of things non-Paleo, I missed the Nutella. However, it is now gone and I can move on. I know that 40 years of SAD and 32 years of an eating disorder will take more than a month to overcome and I am learning to allow myself to be human and fall off the wagon. This is incredibly difficult because I am a perfectionist and really hate to mess up whatever it is I am doing. This was my first major stumble and I know it will not be my last. I am traveling to a meeting at the end of this week where there is lots of eating and drinking in the evening and I am trying to get into my own head before I leave and tell myself that it isn't necessary to drink anything but water!

6747a5447a3440b5c87ebf5f2c1e0ead

(231)

on May 31, 2012
at 02:28 PM

"I know that 40 years of SAD and 32 years of an eating disorder will take more than a month to overcome." +1! I don't think we should force ourselves to work within deadlines, just do the best we can, at a pace we are comfortable with.

3
Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

on May 30, 2012
at 01:49 AM

I've had issues with eating for as long as I can remember. Being in therapy really helped, getting to the root of why I felt out of control in certain areas of my life and turned to eating as my outlet where I had complete control. Yoga helps center me and calm my obsessive mind. I used to weigh myself daily as a gauge for what I could eat each day. Now I don't even weigh in weekly. But above all, the biggest thing that helped was educating myself. Learning about nutrition changed me in so many ways. I see clean, Paleo food as fuel to feel as awesome as I've been feeling lately. I used to eat a handful of pretzels and an apple and that was it for the day. Now I would just be concerned about getting enough protein, fat, and vegetables. Congratulations on being healthy! It really opens up a whole new world.

2
93eea7754e6e94b6085dbabbb48c0bb7

on May 30, 2012
at 02:16 AM

I have developed what I call mindful eating with at least one meal a day. It is a sort of meditative eating. First, you observe your food completely aware saying "observing, observing." Then you move your arm saying, "moving, moving" (all consciously!). Then you say, "grabbing, grabbing...lifting, lifting...opening, opening...lowering fork, lowering...closing mouth, closing...chewing slowly, chewing..enjoying." Food is nothing except what we make it out to be. By doing this it allows us to develop an objective relationship instead of emotional and releases any attachment. It may seem tedious, but by eating this way it is also slower, allowing us to enjoy what we eat instead of gorging and then becoming fuller faster. It works most effectively when alone, but I still practice eating slowly and chewing a bunch out at dinner too!

Also just getting any of those trigger foods out of the house and replacing them with healthy alternatives. No nuts are allowed in my house and I don't eat them at all-- I treat it like an allergy. In addition, I don't snack because it promotes binging. Whenever I eat it needs to be a meal.

Lastly, the MOST important thing I can offer is LISTEN to your body. After acclimating to such a whole diet like paleo it won't lie when it needs carbs or fruit. Listen and love.

93eea7754e6e94b6085dbabbb48c0bb7

on May 30, 2012
at 02:20 AM

IF I think has helped me as well. But if you are a bit compulsive this restrictiveness could 'eff things up even more.

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