1

votes

eating times and weight loss

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 10, 2011 at 4:44 AM

Does eating closer to sleep time affect weight loss/body composition?

Does eating near bedtime really contribute to fat/weight gain?

I'm asking because my schedule tends to push me towards more late dinners (as in eating an hour or two before bed). Is this problematic?

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on February 15, 2012
at 02:32 PM

We all demand an end to telling people that they can eat whatever they like without long-term consequences.

8cbb06eb84dad8d2db56fcc4d8bdc0ba

on May 16, 2011
at 04:16 AM

Hi Stephen-Aegis: What is your workout/eating schedule like on non-fasting days? or do you only have two meals per day?

Ceda025d1f349bc43be115a5f9199fb1

(501)

on January 11, 2011
at 06:47 PM

Right, I speculate that a healthy metabolism will attempt to autoregulate in the face of overfeeding. If we allow ourselves an opportunity to, say, increase activity or decrease food intake subsequently. I imagine we can very easily override this possible autoregulation with learned behaviors.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on January 11, 2011
at 03:09 AM

I wish I could find the original study instead of just a review of it. One issue is that bad sleep has been well documented to cause quite a bit of weight gain. Could be the act of waking up the rats in the middle of their sleep cycle was the main prob. It would be like if I ate a bunch of my meals in the middle of the night but didn't eat during the day. That is enough to majorly screw up the circadian cycle. PLus they are extrapolating a lot to spin this to assume that just eating dinner a tad later is also bad.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on January 11, 2011
at 02:59 AM

Your body will automatically maintain its setpoint, so any alterations in fat storage will be conpensated by hunger/craving levels.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 10, 2011
at 10:20 PM

Stupid iPhone, fainted = autocorrected gained. Sigh.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 10, 2011
at 08:02 PM

Red wine is one of my permanent cheats. I have 1-2 glasses 5x week. Don't stress over it at all. For lunch post workout I eat a tuber or two with my meats. Dinner is usually alot of meat with a small veggie garnish.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on January 10, 2011
at 05:56 PM

Could you define "limited carbs"? About 3 or 4 times a week I play sports, then feast (usually zero carbs), and have 2 or 3 glasses of wine. I'm not sure the carb content of dry red wine but I've seen it listed at 3 or 4 grams. Would you consider that a "limited carb" dinner?

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 10, 2011
at 05:27 PM

Ambi hit the nail on the head, carbs before bed are not for everyday. In addition, most of the bedtime weight fainted are because people are eating an additional meal because of post darkness blue light stimulation etc.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on January 10, 2011
at 01:38 PM

Sounds good -- see my comment to Eva.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on January 10, 2011
at 01:38 PM

Well, I think this is generally true, with one caveat. Growth hormone, which stimulates tissue repair, is most active in the first few hours of sleep, and it is inhibited by high levels of blood glucose. So it may be detrimental to eat a lot of carbohydrate just before bed.

6426d61a13689f8f651164b10f121d64

(11488)

on January 10, 2011
at 12:57 PM

Related threads: http://paleohacks.com/questions/351/eating-before-sleeping/375#375 and http://paleohacks.com/questions/965/does-my-body-digest-food-while-i-sleep/985#985

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11 Answers

4
4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

on January 10, 2011
at 05:03 PM

I skipped breakfast, worked out before lunch, ate a small meal(if I had carbs this is where they went), then feasted an hour or two before bed.

Intermittent fasting works.

Workouts while fasted are vital!

Meals before bed, with no sugar/limited carbs made me sleep like a king.

105lbs and visible abs in just over 9 months.

531db50c958cf4d5605ee0c5ae8a57be

(8878)

on January 10, 2011
at 05:56 PM

Could you define "limited carbs"? About 3 or 4 times a week I play sports, then feast (usually zero carbs), and have 2 or 3 glasses of wine. I'm not sure the carb content of dry red wine but I've seen it listed at 3 or 4 grams. Would you consider that a "limited carb" dinner?

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 10, 2011
at 08:02 PM

Red wine is one of my permanent cheats. I have 1-2 glasses 5x week. Don't stress over it at all. For lunch post workout I eat a tuber or two with my meats. Dinner is usually alot of meat with a small veggie garnish.

8cbb06eb84dad8d2db56fcc4d8bdc0ba

on May 16, 2011
at 04:16 AM

Hi Stephen-Aegis: What is your workout/eating schedule like on non-fasting days? or do you only have two meals per day?

4
62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on January 10, 2011
at 05:10 AM

It's an old wive's tale that eating late makes you gain more weight. There is no decent evidence behind such an assumption, although in the larger scheme of things, anything that effects sleep could potentially contribute to weight gain or loss. Good sleep could contribute to better weight control, but I have never had any problems eating and then sleeping soundly. IMO, it's very natural to eat a big meal and then take a nap. My advice would be to eat when it works for you and not worry about if it is late or not.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 10, 2011
at 10:20 PM

Stupid iPhone, fainted = autocorrected gained. Sigh.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on January 10, 2011
at 01:38 PM

Well, I think this is generally true, with one caveat. Growth hormone, which stimulates tissue repair, is most active in the first few hours of sleep, and it is inhibited by high levels of blood glucose. So it may be detrimental to eat a lot of carbohydrate just before bed.

4b97e3bb2ee4a9588783f5d56d687da1

(22923)

on January 10, 2011
at 05:27 PM

Ambi hit the nail on the head, carbs before bed are not for everyday. In addition, most of the bedtime weight fainted are because people are eating an additional meal because of post darkness blue light stimulation etc.

2
A727956fa3f943057c4edb08ad9e864e

on January 10, 2011
at 08:25 PM

I did find this:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/health/8234386.stm

One group of mice ate at times when they would normally be asleep. They put on twice as much weight.

On mice I know, but interesting I think.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on January 11, 2011
at 03:09 AM

I wish I could find the original study instead of just a review of it. One issue is that bad sleep has been well documented to cause quite a bit of weight gain. Could be the act of waking up the rats in the middle of their sleep cycle was the main prob. It would be like if I ate a bunch of my meals in the middle of the night but didn't eat during the day. That is enough to majorly screw up the circadian cycle. PLus they are extrapolating a lot to spin this to assume that just eating dinner a tad later is also bad.

1
Medium avatar

on January 10, 2011
at 06:03 AM

I often eat big meals right before bed, but lately I've been eliminating carbs from my last meal, where I would normally eat a piece of fruit or equivalent. I figure I'll have a really low draw on glycogen stores when I'm sleeping so I won't need to eat carbs late at night. Not sure if it's sound logic or not, but I continue to feel great so I'll continue this practice.

100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18696)

on January 10, 2011
at 01:38 PM

Sounds good -- see my comment to Eva.

0
B6b2363b89dabe8ef39c071ed6c72dba

on May 09, 2013
at 02:12 PM

After not being able to lose weight on Paleo for six months (I only have about 15 lbs to go to reach "ideal weight"), I have recently started incorporating the Carb Addicts Diet (Drs. Heller), where you skip breakfast, or have only protein and non-starchy veggies for breakfast and lunch, and then eat whatever you want, relatively speaking, within one hour at night. I still stick to paleo foods, with the occassional cheat during my hour. I've finally been able to loosen my belt after only a week. I haven't read the book yet but did read all the reviews on Amazon.

0
22bb5cf7c52731de5bbb9e4aad4f5873

on May 09, 2013
at 12:49 PM

Hello!!. I am not sure about eating near to bedtime contribute fat/weight gain. But it is a fact that the major issue that people facing today is Weight loss. But now a days there are many wealth loss program like the Tryfoodlovers.com that would make you slim and fit with the perfect body you wish to see yourself. It all depends on your sleep schedule .Just try to do it a couple of hours before you go to bed so your food can digest properly. I'll probably have 8-8:30pm which is a good time to have dinner.

0
99ce8cef72be026bc8f524dfc4dfa728

on October 03, 2012
at 06:44 AM

yes, taking meal at late night directly affects weight, as after taking meal one should do some physical work like walking or something, it helps much in digesting food but if you will just sleep after your meal then the food will not be able to get digested and will cause problem like weight increase and insufficient digestion. So take your night meal in evening or at least two hour before you sleep.

Little about nutritionist Isabel De Los Rios

0
246ebf68e35743f62e5e187891b9cba0

(21420)

on February 15, 2012
at 02:03 PM

I personally sleep better when I've not eaten within 2-3 hours of sleep, but this has more to do with TEF and the fact that I really have trouble sleeping if I'm too warm.

0
D07a525f9021f8d72bf6aaa52893c795

(1011)

on February 15, 2012
at 10:48 AM

I would consider skipping dinner if you're not eating out/socialising under these circumstances. A light meal that is ideally low carb, low protein, but fat rich is an option if going without dinner is unthinkable. It's not only about weight loss, but intermittent fasting can really help with melting body fat in any case. Intermittent fasting, and a prolonged ketogenic diet will help you reset your set point, which is not something one should see as fixed.

0
Ceda025d1f349bc43be115a5f9199fb1

(501)

on January 10, 2011
at 11:22 AM

Hasn't been a problem for me. Sure, fractionally more fat gets stored than if you ate earlier and went for a walk. But, you burn it off later on. Anything we eat that doesn't go to structure, energy, waste or heat ends up stored to be used later on. So, all that matters is the total amount you eat and when has less to do with it. That being said, some report marginal body comp advantages to long fasting periods. I eat twice daily, essentially the lunch and dinner IF plan, but dinner ends up close to bed time.

62ed65f3596aa2f62fa1d58a0c09f8c3

(20807)

on January 11, 2011
at 02:59 AM

Your body will automatically maintain its setpoint, so any alterations in fat storage will be conpensated by hunger/craving levels.

Ceda025d1f349bc43be115a5f9199fb1

(501)

on January 11, 2011
at 06:47 PM

Right, I speculate that a healthy metabolism will attempt to autoregulate in the face of overfeeding. If we allow ourselves an opportunity to, say, increase activity or decrease food intake subsequently. I imagine we can very easily override this possible autoregulation with learned behaviors.

-1
E6064beadf13cc558edce7a937a868cb

on February 15, 2012
at 09:37 AM

We all demand a fast weight loss, but become helpless when it comes with sacrificing our favorite foods. Try food lovers fat loss system that brings you the essential healthy weight loss without any forbidden foods. It's purely based on an approach of eating foods in combination to reset the body metabolism and can completely turn the body into Fat burning mode. Food Lovers Diet is an easy and comfortable weight loss program. Start loosing weight today!!!!!

Ca2c940a1947e6200883908592956680

(8574)

on February 15, 2012
at 02:32 PM

We all demand an end to telling people that they can eat whatever they like without long-term consequences.

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