4

votes

Does Running 5 Miles in 35-45Minutes 5x a week = Chronic Cardio?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created September 23, 2011 at 1:30 AM

I am looking for a cardio workout program that I can do on a treadmill at the gym that will help me burn body fat. Want to lose 60lbs ASAP!

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on September 23, 2011
at 08:18 PM

If you read Mark Sisson's article, he doesn't necessarily state that regular cardio exercise constitutes "chronic cardio." It becomes chronic when one no longer enjoys it, hurts from doing, and just does it to burn calories without much other benefit.

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 23, 2011
at 04:44 PM

You only need to chase them to exhaustion. It happens quickly in the midday sun. We are the masters there. Look at an unkempt Afro hairdo; it's a coolie hat. Look at our pathetic olfactory sense; it's useless without your nose to the ground, eyes and brain compensate. Look at our whole array of heat-management features.

7d64d3988de1b0e493aacf37843c5596

(2861)

on September 23, 2011
at 02:13 PM

I don’t think 35-45 minutes of moderate to low intensity cardio is “chronic,” so it depends how good of shape you are in. Five miles in 35 minutes sounds too high of intensity for me, but maybe you are in a lot better shape than I am. I would do better walking at good clip for 2 miles in 40 minutes.

485bcefe7f1f7a6df1a293a826bf6137

(2191)

on September 23, 2011
at 02:09 PM

Huey, animals can outrun us any day. We didn't run after supper. Our superior brains enabled us to outsmart animals. There may have been some short sprinting involved, but if we regularly ran for miles after supper, we would not be here today.

485bcefe7f1f7a6df1a293a826bf6137

(2191)

on September 23, 2011
at 02:05 PM

Mark Sisson discussed it in his AHS lecture. Does it makes sense that our prehistoric ancestors would have been running for no good reason, using up precious energy back in times when food might not have been plentiful?

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 23, 2011
at 01:54 PM

By the way, I do think running puts too much wear and tear on the joints, compared to biking. Er, maybe that would be fixed too, by the paleo diet. Hmm, gotta think it over. Never mind.

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 23, 2011
at 01:51 PM

Bah! Ran out of digi-bytes! Oh well.

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 23, 2011
at 01:50 PM

I was on the low-impact version of the same exercise regimen (bicycling, not running) for several years. I don't think the exercise hurt a bit. It was the junk diet (vodka included, but it counts as sugar as far as your insulin is concerned). I developed CHF. Never had a heart attack. The strong heart kept me from dying. Look at it this way: You're not running every day to flee predators, you ARE a predator, chasing down supper. Every day. We evolved as hunters, lords of the midday sun. Because of our upright posture, we suffer less heatstroke than animal with horizontal posture. All are oth

9d741bcbe702044635f2ce3078043054

(1435)

on September 23, 2011
at 01:43 PM

Evidence please...

9d741bcbe702044635f2ce3078043054

(1435)

on September 23, 2011
at 01:42 PM

I've always been skeptical of the "chronic cardio" part of the Paleo regime. While the Paleo community tends to be very evidence based, I think the evidence that regular cardio work is harmful (or not helpful) is weak. Remember, study subjects probably fuel their cardio work with lots of carbs, making them poor models for Paleos doing cardio.

25b139cc1954456d9ea469e40f984cd3

on September 23, 2011
at 03:12 AM

If you are 60lbs overweight and can run 5 miles in 35 mins, you are a world-class distance runner under all that blubber...

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9 Answers

6
De65560c40ddb3f27764307ffa504240

on September 23, 2011
at 02:42 AM

I distrust the term "chronic cardio," as it's loaded. Depending on one's goals, regular medium-distance running is a fine way to establish an aerobic base, and I think running gets a bad rap. Ali and most boxers of his and previous generations placed great value on their regular roadwork (I guess what we'd now call "GPP") with millions of dollars riding on their sport-specific performance. I hesitate to discount their opinions, based on their results and my own anecdotal experience.

That said, if weight loss is your primary goal, medium to long-distance running is far overrated for that purpose. It's not uncommon for non-competitive runners to entirely compensate (or overcompensate) for calories burned through running by increased food intake. Elite marathoners look positively anorexic, but I've known several hobby marathoners who experienced no significant weight loss during their training.

As has been noted, diet is paramount for non-competitive athletes. Run because you want to or to establish aerobic base for a primary sport, not to become "thin."

9d741bcbe702044635f2ce3078043054

(1435)

on September 23, 2011
at 01:42 PM

I've always been skeptical of the "chronic cardio" part of the Paleo regime. While the Paleo community tends to be very evidence based, I think the evidence that regular cardio work is harmful (or not helpful) is weak. Remember, study subjects probably fuel their cardio work with lots of carbs, making them poor models for Paleos doing cardio.

072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on September 23, 2011
at 08:18 PM

If you read Mark Sisson's article, he doesn't necessarily state that regular cardio exercise constitutes "chronic cardio." It becomes chronic when one no longer enjoys it, hurts from doing, and just does it to burn calories without much other benefit.

6
310003694bbcc5c6a0ba44dd95b8b521

on September 23, 2011
at 01:45 AM

Yes, that many times a week I would consider chronic. Try a mix of lifting heavy weights 2 x per week, some running as you spec. maybe 1 or 2 times a week and lots of walking. Chronic cardio is not the answer; you???ll just want to fuel the carb monster and the fat making, to keep up the running. You need to change the common wisdom outlook , it does not work. Carbs make you fat, so eat fat , low carb and med protein. Lifestyle dietary changes are in order, no crash exercise program will get you where you want to go.

4
072fd69647b0e765bb4b11532569f16d

(3717)

on September 23, 2011
at 02:27 AM

From the man who actully coined the term "chronic cardio": http://www.marksdailyapple.com/chronic-cardio/

I would say that 5 miles 5+ times a week would probably be overdoing it for someone looking to lose 60 lbs. Even if not "chronic" (and it just might be), it will be excessive pounding on the same joints and muscles. Your body will respond best to variety and, as others suggest, lifting weight and sprinting. 45+ minutes x5 a week on a treadmill sounds mind-numbing. Mix it up. Have fun and enjoy instead of making your exercise a dull mission to a difficult to achieve goal.

4
74c1777d7d39b053ca64c065dcdb0072

on September 23, 2011
at 02:12 AM

80%( or more) is diet. Take a look at archevore and work from there. If you love running, this is fine, but know that running is for fun and not for losing fat.

http://www.archevore.com/get-started/

if you want to burn fat, lift weights and sprint.

3
485bcefe7f1f7a6df1a293a826bf6137

on September 23, 2011
at 01:26 PM

I know runners don't like to hear this, but facts are facts. Because of million-year-old programming your body thinks you are being chased by an animal 5x a week. Nature will take you out. Excessive, chronic cortisol will destroy your heart. Michael RB said diet is 80% of weight loss. I'll go further; I think it's closer to 95%.

9d741bcbe702044635f2ce3078043054

(1435)

on September 23, 2011
at 01:43 PM

Evidence please...

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 23, 2011
at 04:44 PM

You only need to chase them to exhaustion. It happens quickly in the midday sun. We are the masters there. Look at an unkempt Afro hairdo; it's a coolie hat. Look at our pathetic olfactory sense; it's useless without your nose to the ground, eyes and brain compensate. Look at our whole array of heat-management features.

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 23, 2011
at 01:54 PM

By the way, I do think running puts too much wear and tear on the joints, compared to biking. Er, maybe that would be fixed too, by the paleo diet. Hmm, gotta think it over. Never mind.

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 23, 2011
at 01:50 PM

I was on the low-impact version of the same exercise regimen (bicycling, not running) for several years. I don't think the exercise hurt a bit. It was the junk diet (vodka included, but it counts as sugar as far as your insulin is concerned). I developed CHF. Never had a heart attack. The strong heart kept me from dying. Look at it this way: You're not running every day to flee predators, you ARE a predator, chasing down supper. Every day. We evolved as hunters, lords of the midday sun. Because of our upright posture, we suffer less heatstroke than animal with horizontal posture. All are oth

485bcefe7f1f7a6df1a293a826bf6137

(2191)

on September 23, 2011
at 02:05 PM

Mark Sisson discussed it in his AHS lecture. Does it makes sense that our prehistoric ancestors would have been running for no good reason, using up precious energy back in times when food might not have been plentiful?

93ae9f2d376e5426e891a9b58d8302fa

(2936)

on September 23, 2011
at 01:51 PM

Bah! Ran out of digi-bytes! Oh well.

485bcefe7f1f7a6df1a293a826bf6137

(2191)

on September 23, 2011
at 02:09 PM

Huey, animals can outrun us any day. We didn't run after supper. Our superior brains enabled us to outsmart animals. There may have been some short sprinting involved, but if we regularly ran for miles after supper, we would not be here today.

2
B3e7d1ab5aeb329fe24cca1de1a0b09c

(5242)

on September 23, 2011
at 02:42 AM

It depends on who you are. The chronic cardio concept can be taken completely out of context IMHO.

If you're a fit endurance athlete type, then no, 5 miles at whatever pace isn't chronic cardio.

However if you're over weight and out of shape then yes, doing 5 miles 5 times a week could possibly work against you. I say possibly because I am sure there are a heap of people who lost serious weight doing something similar (but those same people probably made a lot of other changes to their lifestyle to drop the weight).

If you want to drop 60 pounds you need to get your diet dialed in and get your sleep to a really high standard. You can drop your weight doing those two things alone. Cut the grains, the sugar, processed franken foods and vegetables oils as your number priority.

But it's still good for you to move, and it can certainly aid weight loss. As Michael RB mention, lifting weights and sprinting are great. But anything that is high in intensity, not too long in duration and includes resistance is going to be good, and far better bang for your buck than doing steady state cardio 5 miles at a time.

1
7d64d3988de1b0e493aacf37843c5596

(2861)

on September 23, 2011
at 02:06 PM

Every time I have lost substantial weight AND got down to my ideal weight, it has involved fasted cardio for 40 minutes or so 4-5 times a week. You don???t need to run 7-minute miles though. More moderate or even light-intensity works better. You want a lower-stress fat-burning workout. If you have the time to spare, then a longer workout at lower intensity is probably better.

0
Cd2ff8c68dd1f1d539ad7f0ee94b0421

on September 23, 2011
at 02:57 PM

I'd say "yes", and I used to run 80-90 miles a week not that long ago.

I'd say 3 miles 3 times a week would be enough slow cardio. If you want more endurance, do HIIT or Tabata or something like that. Much more efficient, time-wise, and more effective unless you're preparing for a half marathon ... which you really shouldn't be doing anyway from a 'Paleo' standpoint.

0
89e238284ccb95b439edcff9e123671e

(10299)

on September 23, 2011
at 01:48 PM

Is it chronic cardio? If you are enjoying it, doing it outdoors in a natural environment, more or less intermittent, no!

But I guess your question is: is it efficient for weight loss? Probably not. More results from lifting and sprinting (as all the above have commented) and from dieatary changes.

You want to do more than two weightliftings sessions and one sprint a week? Walk, take your bike, swim gently, ... And relax, breathe, have fun with friends (stay away from the food and booze though). Hell, sleep a little more, it will probably help reducing the weight.

Mark Sisson's advice on this is really solid.

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