1

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Weigh 1 lb more mornings after weight lifting?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 09, 2013 at 3:02 PM

I'm not at all worried/concerned/upset about this - just curious. It seems I weigh ~1 lb more the mornings after I lift weights the day before versus the mornings after rest days. I'm curious as to what might be causing it. I'd like to think it's that there is increased blood flow/fluid in the muscles as they're being repaired. Is that at all possible? Of course, I'm not rigid about getting exact same amount of water, salt, sleep, same foods, etc every day, so I realize this could just be a statistical anomaly and/or confirmation bias, but I've seen this trend over a period of at least a few weeks.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 10, 2013
at 01:44 AM

The only point is that carbohydrates do not hydrate you. I didn't mention ketones because I did not know they were similar, although wiki agrees with you, so I will go with that. Not a big deal, just saw a common misunderstanding and thought I'd point it out.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 09:17 PM

It is well known that when you drop carbs you pee more and lose water weight. Hence, carbs are hydrating in that they retain water. Your critique, again, was useless and pointless.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 07:22 PM

And your argument doesn't make sense. Not saying it's wrong, just I don't know enough chemistry to see the relevance of it. You're saying they aren't structurally similar to hydrates, but more so to aldose and ketones (which you failed to mention the latter). So, what? They certainly don't produce the affect of ketones. They do produce the affect aldose though, as that's just a simple sugar. I don't understand the relevance of your pointing this out.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 07:10 PM

And your argument doesn't make sense. You're saying they aren't structurally similar to hydrates, but more so to aldose and ketones (which you failed to mention the latter). Well, they certainly don't produce the affect of ketones. They do produce the affect aldose though, as that's just a simple sugar. I don't understand the relevance of your critique then.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 07:08 PM

And your argument doesn't make sense. You're saying they aren't structurally similar to- aldose and ketones (which you failed to mention). Well, they certainly don't produce the affect of ketones. They do produce the affect aldose though, as that's just a simple sugar.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:59 PM

CD my mastery is bro-science, not actual science. A produces B affect is all I really care about.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:59 PM

CD my mastery is in bro-science, not actual science. A produces B affect is all I really care about.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:57 PM

I don;t understand how something containing the components of water (carbon and oxygen) could not be inherently hydrating for your muscle cells when it is stored in them, as that;s where glucose (carbon hydrogen and oxygen) is stored in people with insulin sensitive muscles.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:55 PM

CD my master is in bro-science, not actual science. So, what you're saying means absolutely nothing to me. A produces B affect is all I really care about.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:49 PM

The hydrate in carbohydrate has nothing to do with hydration. They are carbohydrates because they are compounds of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Carbohydrates are not even hydrates they are an aldose. But perhaps many of the carbohydrates do contain water as the form of the bond of hydrogen and oxygen.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:43 PM

Also, if you think about it, this is why fat people don't like carbs and care about how much they weigh and (the overwhleming majority of) fit people recognize carbs as essential and don't care about their weight. Dropping carbs loses (mostly water) weight. If you are insulin resistant, carbs make you store subcutaneous water and gain weight and look fatter than you really are (puffier). If you are insulin sensitive, the water/glucose goes into your muscle cells and makes you look fuller and harder. Since fit people decipher between body composition and weight, they benefit.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:42 PM

Also, if you think about it, this is why fat people don't like carbs and care about how much they weigh and (the overwhleming majority of) fit people recognize carbs as essential and don't care about their weight. Dropping carbs loses (mostly water) weight. If you are insulin resistant, carbs make you store subcutaneous water and gain weight and look fatter than you really are (puffier). If you are insulin sensitive, the water/glucose goes into your muscle cells and makes you look fuller and harder.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:31 PM

This is also why physique conscious people, fitness models, and bodybuilders generally prefer starch or dextrose to fruit or sugar. Whether they recognize it or not, they are doing this because glucose efficiently fills muscle glycogen (bringing water and glucose other nutrients into the muscle cells) and fructose does not. Fructose actually leaves the liver as fat. So if you eat a high fructose diet, you're eating a high fat diet, and hence a diet not conducive to creating a truly aesthetic body.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:30 PM

This is also why physique conscious people generally prefer starch or dextrose to fruit or sugar. Whether they recognize it or not, they are doing this because glucose efficiently fills muscle glycogen (bringing water and glucose other nutrients into the muscle cells) and fructose does not. Fructose actually leaves the liver as fat. So if you eat a high fructose diet, you're eating a high fat diet, and hence a diet not conducive to creating a truly aesthetic body.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:29 PM

This is also why physique conscious people generally prefer starch or dextrose to fruit or sugar. Whether they recognize it or not, they are doing this because glucose efficiently fills muscle glycogen (bringing water and glucose other nutrients into the muscle cells) and fructose does not. Fructose actually leaves the liver as fat. So if you eat a high fructose diet, you're eating a high fat diet.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:16 PM

"If I was not getting pumped from my workout, I would eat more carbohydrates" -Frank Zane

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:10 PM

If a not lean/insulin sensitive person were to do this they would complain of "water retention" which is subcutaneous water retention and does not leave the skin tight around the muscle belly. This person would look puffy and not hard/dry.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:08 PM

If a not lean/insulin sensitive person were to do this they would complain of "water retention" which is subcutaneous water retention and does not leave the skin tight around the muscle belly.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:07 PM

That's what happens when bodybuildings dehydrate a couple days before competition and then rehydrate with lots of carbs on the day of the competition. Leaves their skin tight and their muscle bellies full (of water/glycogen) and creates a dry, hard look.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:06 PM

That's what happens when bodybuildings dehydrate a couple days before competition and then rehydrate with lots of carbs on the day of the competition.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:03 PM

Oh, especially if you consume more carbs on weight training days, you will definitely have more intra-muscular fluid (if your muscles are insulin sensitive...probably are). That's why they call em carboHYDRATES.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:02 PM

That's what I was going to say- more itnra-muscular fluid...especially if you are doing higher rep (8+), higher volume training (compound + isolation exercises). I only weigh myself about once per week, so can't comment that I've noticed the same, but I might try this and let you know what happens.

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4 Answers

2
48800324cf5786f4d7517eae067f5cbc

on February 09, 2013
at 05:56 PM

Exercise increases caloric/metabolic demand and will make you more thirsty and hungry. Perhaps you're simply taking in a bit more food/water that's hanging around over night.

1-2# differences between days are usually attributed to stomach contents, bowl movements, unire patterns, etc.

1
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on February 09, 2013
at 06:19 PM

That's what I was going to say: more itnra-muscular fluid...especially if you are doing higher rep (8+), higher volume training (compound + isolation exercises). Additionally, if you consume more carbs on weight training days, you will definitely carry more intra-muscular fluid (if your muscles are insulin sensitive...and they probably are). They aren't carboHYDRATES for nothing.

This is why bodybuilders dehydrate a couple days before competition and then rehydrate with lots of carbs on the day of the competition. Leaves their skin tight and their muscle bellies full (of water/glycogen) and creates a dry, hard look... If a not lean/insulin sensitive person were to do this they would complain of "water retention" which is subcutaneous water retention and does not leave the skin tight around the muscle belly. This person would look puffy and not hard/dry.

To illustrate, here's a quote from the one and only Frank Zane-"If I was not getting pumped from my workout, I would eat more carbohydrates"

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:57 PM

I don;t understand how something containing the components of water (carbon and oxygen) could not be inherently hydrating for your muscle cells when it is stored in them, as that;s where glucose (carbon hydrogen and oxygen) is stored in people with insulin sensitive muscles.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:59 PM

CD my mastery is in bro-science, not actual science. A produces B affect is all I really care about.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:43 PM

Also, if you think about it, this is why fat people don't like carbs and care about how much they weigh and (the overwhleming majority of) fit people recognize carbs as essential and don't care about their weight. Dropping carbs loses (mostly water) weight. If you are insulin resistant, carbs make you store subcutaneous water and gain weight and look fatter than you really are (puffier). If you are insulin sensitive, the water/glucose goes into your muscle cells and makes you look fuller and harder. Since fit people decipher between body composition and weight, they benefit.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:29 PM

This is also why physique conscious people generally prefer starch or dextrose to fruit or sugar. Whether they recognize it or not, they are doing this because glucose efficiently fills muscle glycogen (bringing water and glucose other nutrients into the muscle cells) and fructose does not. Fructose actually leaves the liver as fat. So if you eat a high fructose diet, you're eating a high fat diet.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 07:22 PM

And your argument doesn't make sense. Not saying it's wrong, just I don't know enough chemistry to see the relevance of it. You're saying they aren't structurally similar to hydrates, but more so to aldose and ketones (which you failed to mention the latter). So, what? They certainly don't produce the affect of ketones. They do produce the affect aldose though, as that's just a simple sugar. I don't understand the relevance of your pointing this out.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 07:08 PM

And your argument doesn't make sense. You're saying they aren't structurally similar to- aldose and ketones (which you failed to mention). Well, they certainly don't produce the affect of ketones. They do produce the affect aldose though, as that's just a simple sugar.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:42 PM

Also, if you think about it, this is why fat people don't like carbs and care about how much they weigh and (the overwhleming majority of) fit people recognize carbs as essential and don't care about their weight. Dropping carbs loses (mostly water) weight. If you are insulin resistant, carbs make you store subcutaneous water and gain weight and look fatter than you really are (puffier). If you are insulin sensitive, the water/glucose goes into your muscle cells and makes you look fuller and harder.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 10, 2013
at 01:44 AM

The only point is that carbohydrates do not hydrate you. I didn't mention ketones because I did not know they were similar, although wiki agrees with you, so I will go with that. Not a big deal, just saw a common misunderstanding and thought I'd point it out.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:49 PM

The hydrate in carbohydrate has nothing to do with hydration. They are carbohydrates because they are compounds of carbon, hydrogen, and oxygen. Carbohydrates are not even hydrates they are an aldose. But perhaps many of the carbohydrates do contain water as the form of the bond of hydrogen and oxygen.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:31 PM

This is also why physique conscious people, fitness models, and bodybuilders generally prefer starch or dextrose to fruit or sugar. Whether they recognize it or not, they are doing this because glucose efficiently fills muscle glycogen (bringing water and glucose other nutrients into the muscle cells) and fructose does not. Fructose actually leaves the liver as fat. So if you eat a high fructose diet, you're eating a high fat diet, and hence a diet not conducive to creating a truly aesthetic body.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 07:10 PM

And your argument doesn't make sense. You're saying they aren't structurally similar to hydrates, but more so to aldose and ketones (which you failed to mention the latter). Well, they certainly don't produce the affect of ketones. They do produce the affect aldose though, as that's just a simple sugar. I don't understand the relevance of your critique then.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:59 PM

CD my mastery is bro-science, not actual science. A produces B affect is all I really care about.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:55 PM

CD my master is in bro-science, not actual science. So, what you're saying means absolutely nothing to me. A produces B affect is all I really care about.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 09:17 PM

It is well known that when you drop carbs you pee more and lose water weight. Hence, carbs are hydrating in that they retain water. Your critique, again, was useless and pointless.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on February 09, 2013
at 06:30 PM

This is also why physique conscious people generally prefer starch or dextrose to fruit or sugar. Whether they recognize it or not, they are doing this because glucose efficiently fills muscle glycogen (bringing water and glucose other nutrients into the muscle cells) and fructose does not. Fructose actually leaves the liver as fat. So if you eat a high fructose diet, you're eating a high fat diet, and hence a diet not conducive to creating a truly aesthetic body.

0
9d142ffae34c518722ea67d4cfb89a19

on February 10, 2013
at 12:39 AM

1st thing that crosses my mind, and may be way off base, is that on your rest days you may get up and have breakfast and say a cup of coffee, on your workout days, the same + 1L or so of fluids at the gym.

1L of water = 1kg = 2.2lbs...

Maybe.. shrug :)

0
B2634bf90fa31b48a60e7c4f06761200

on February 09, 2013
at 07:48 PM

I also read that after the muscle breakdown induced by weightlifting, when you are feeling sore, that's a sign that your muscles are edematous (swollen) and inflamed, and are then retaining water, which can increase your weight.

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