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Why do I continue adding weight?

Answered on October 04, 2013
Created October 03, 2013 at 2:13 AM

I started the Paleo Diet about a month ago and I immediately got results. I am 5'2 and weighed 137 pounds, shooting down to 124 pounds. My goal was to be about 115-120 pounds. I know most of the weight lost towards the beginning of this new lifestyle was water weight, but now, the pounds are creeping up again. I currently weigh 128. I am an athlete, training endurance swimming 2 hours a day, 4-6 times a week depending on the amount of school work I have. I am pretty strict about the diet. I will have a few "non-Paleo" foods about 3-4 times a week (brown rice, beans, rarely pasta), always during dinner, due to the fact that I don't cook the meal because I am only 15. I realize that I shouldn't have to worry about how much I weight compared to adults, but I'm looking for a leaner, healthier body, one that could improve my performance in the pool and make me look great. I have limited the amount of fruit (which is about 2-3 servings a day) and nuts I eat. On resting days, I tend to restrict my fruit to about one serving a day.

Here is my food schedule for a day:

Breakfast: 3 eggs in an omelet with broccoli, onions, ham, lettuce, tomatoes, and peppers cooked on butter

Lunch: Large salad with ham, lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, onions, cauliflower, dried cranberries, and about 3-5 tablespoons of olive oil

Pre-Workout: 1/2 banana

Post-Workout: 1 oz. of ham, 1 large carrot

Dinner: Usually contains 4-5 oz. of meat, salad (lettuce, tomatoes, cucumbers, onions), a starchy vegetable like potatoes, and cooked vegetables (again, on occasion the starchy vegetables may be replaced by rice, beans, pasta, etc.)

(sometimes) Dessert: 6-8 strawberries with shredded coconut or a few 70%+ squares of chocolate

I get about 6-8 hours of sleep a night, and I know that's not the amount of time I am supposed to get per night, but it's the best I can acquire due to schoolwork and my training. Is there anything I should do to improve what I eat throughout the day? Thank you in advance to any responders!

B2eb3ff4456b2408e6db558072e7d3f2

(414)

on October 03, 2013
at 07:36 PM

and more calories! You are likely putting on weight b/c your metabolism is in starvation mode from too much exercise + too little calories--your body is holding onto as much fat as it can. I say ignore the scale for a while and try to eat more calories, especially adding carbs in. You might gain some weight but eventually you will heal your metabolism, and your body will start processing food properly--such as burning fat. Also you shouldn't be so obsessed with food, it will lead you down the path of an eating disorder.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on October 03, 2013
at 01:01 PM

I wouldn't call [email protected]'2'' for a female skinny - "fit", maybe. Considering that OP claims to be an athlete, "skinny" is almost certainly not the right choice of words. Let's call a spade a spade - skinny means "skin and bones".

I completely agree with your points about BF%.

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3 Answers

0
B2eb3ff4456b2408e6db558072e7d3f2

on October 03, 2013
at 07:33 PM

If you are doing that much endurance exercise, you desparately need more carbs in your diet.

B2eb3ff4456b2408e6db558072e7d3f2

(414)

on October 03, 2013
at 07:36 PM

and more calories! You are likely putting on weight b/c your metabolism is in starvation mode from too much exercise + too little calories--your body is holding onto as much fat as it can. I say ignore the scale for a while and try to eat more calories, especially adding carbs in. You might gain some weight but eventually you will heal your metabolism, and your body will start processing food properly--such as burning fat. Also you shouldn't be so obsessed with food, it will lead you down the path of an eating disorder.

0
1f9b52f29960095986234231d91e1967

on October 03, 2013
at 01:37 PM

Fructose can affect weight loss/fat loss, so you might try cutting that out or significantly reducing it -- it appears from your description that you're consuming large amounts of it.

Try a moderate amount of starchy vegetables (such as potatoes) in place of fruits, and cut out all grains and legumes (consume more meats and vegetables if necessary).

Also, try to limit fruit intake (if severely cutting rather than removing) to a particular time of day, and try to aim for perhaps 1-2 days of fruit intake/week. Constant amounts of fructose within the body will constantly trigger insulin responses, which can affect metabolic hormones, and thus fat loss.

The same would likely apply to starchy vegetables -- consume them in short, specific time windows close to your workouts if consuming. Constant intake all day will keep activating insulin and not be terribly good for glucagon or hormone/metabolism modulation if you are aiming to lose fat.

Try consuming more fat (coconut oil, grass-fed ghee if dairy [trace amounts] is tolerated).

Lastly, remove all processed products, as the chemicals in them can, in fact, greatly impact health and weight loss. (This would include pre-made ham with any additives [unless it is ham which you have cured yourself with raw pork and salt as well as pasta. The ubiquitous ham in your diet leapt out as a large potential factor.) Also, remove table "salt" (Which will be in most meals if you ware not preparing them yourself) and replace it with true sea salt/Himalayan salt/Celtic sea salt.

Table "salt" is additive-rich and devoid of minerals.

The 70% chocolate might also be a problem depending on how often "sometimes" is -- regarding diet/ways of eating, it appears extremely common for human beings to grossly underestimate their intake of potentially harmful-to-goal items.

So, "sometimes" and "moderate" are often the first places to look.

--

The most important factor may be the ability to determine how your body feels (energetic? heaviness, bloatedness, tiredness, unhealthy....?) with particular foods, or eating at particular times/frequencies (e.g. 2 or 6 meals a day?; eating close to workout or farther apart?) -- and adjusting accordingly.

Also, important to keep in mind that effects on the body from foods/practices can show up several hours later/the next day--for example, a food sensitivity from dinner could show up as bloating/weight gain in the next 1-3 days--, so cause and effect are a bit complicated.

--

A final note: Because it is difficult to tell depending upon how much lean mass (muscle) you have, body fat % is often far more indicative of a body's constitution than weight-to-height.

0
718fd304d7abab150730638bf2be5153

(184)

on October 03, 2013
at 08:24 AM

You continue adding weight because you're skinny and your body tries hard to reach its ideal weight, considering your high level of physical activity.

You should have your body fat percentage measured (at least by comparing yourself to this: www.builtlean.com/2012/09/24/body-fat-percentage-men-women). As a woman athlete, your body fat percentage needs to be around 20%. Less, and you're taking risks with your health, especially since you're still growing.

Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on October 03, 2013
at 01:01 PM

I wouldn't call [email protected]'2'' for a female skinny - "fit", maybe. Considering that OP claims to be an athlete, "skinny" is almost certainly not the right choice of words. Let's call a spade a spade - skinny means "skin and bones".

I completely agree with your points about BF%.

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