9

votes

Who is successfully reversing their insulin resistance?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 07, 2012 at 6:45 PM

And what has been the process?

I have suffered on and off from sugar crashes. They are fine now, but before I sorted my stuff out they were daily.

It actually wasn't my main focus though, when I decided to make changes - I was primarily concerned with a digestive system that made me consider suicide.

Originally I gave up wheat, and within a couple of months I had lost a stone in weight. I was just overweight beforehand, BMI wise - so I guess there are plenty of people worse off, but I looked pretty fat and unwell and I felt dreadful (I had no energy, always lethargic, probably not much muscle on my body). There is diabetes in my family, and I believe I was headed in that direction (because of the daily sugar crashes).

After a while I gave up sugar and lost another stone very quickly and felt fantastic. At the same time as giving up sugar I was pretty focussed on the idea that I had a candida problem, so I was taking a range of herbal antifungals in the hope I would completely kick the stuff out of my body. Anyway, it seemed to work - my constant bloatedness disappeared and I honestly lost nearly half a stone overnight after I made these changes and then another half over the next two weeks.

The whole time I was doing this I didn't stop eating fruit, rice or potatoes (I wasn't eating bucketloads of this stuff though, but I didn't avoid it), and only later did I realise that my diet was paleo (although obviously there is a variable interpretation of what this means and how to implement it).

Anyway, I'm not diabetic, although I believe I was sort of "pre-diabetic", but I was having horrible sugar crashes. These disappeared at the same time as the weight loss and (what I believe to be) the yeast clear-up/reduction in my gut.

Now, I don't know exactly the cause and effect of these things, perhaps it's different for everybody, and even if it isn't the science probably isn't entirely clear and uncontradictory, but it seems to me that within a short period of time I was able to pull myself back from the brink of diabetes to a healthy state through eating natural food (nothing processed) dropping wheat, refined sugar, and cleansing my gut with health store bought herbal antifungals.

I wanted to share this in case it's of interest to anybody - also I'd like to hear from anybody who has had a related experience.

Thanks :)

Cf4576cbcc44fc7f2294135609bce9e5

(3125)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

why eat rice? it will cause diabetes. think how many diabetics eat rice in India, China.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 09, 2012
at 01:11 PM

I ran one more test 5 hours after the meal and got a 79. If this is a control, then the increase from the fries/salad was 67, only slightly lower than the GI of the fries. So my glycemic response is in line with the test population.

Bfddc0ab925c8ea0e0c2e87198514907

on January 09, 2012
at 10:08 AM

@ The Loon - thanks!

Bfddc0ab925c8ea0e0c2e87198514907

on January 09, 2012
at 10:03 AM

@ Bruno : Yes, this is interesting. I have a family member with both T2 diabetes and bi-polar. Also I have a friend with schizophrenia, and I know that her episodes come after binging on Haribo for days. I read once that the chemical composition of refined sugar is very similar to cocaine (although I can't really make an informed judgement as to what that really implies, it certainly raises a couple of questions).

Bfddc0ab925c8ea0e0c2e87198514907

on January 09, 2012
at 09:57 AM

I eat potatoes more often than rice, and I think that tubers and fruit are perfectly paleo foods. We know that hunter-gatherer societies today eat them and there is evidence of them being eaten archaeologically... Obviously some people may have specific reasons to avoid them, but I don't think it makes sense to black-list them in general. I don't believe many got sick in the first place from eating boiled, steamed or baked potatoes. Fruit is full of good stuff, and must have been the original snack food. I believe it boots my metabolism and cleans my digestive system.

C00e493393828df34be65ddc25456c7c

(610)

on January 09, 2012
at 09:16 AM

I like that you still ate fruit, rice and potatoes and had good results.

C00e493393828df34be65ddc25456c7c

(610)

on January 09, 2012
at 09:14 AM

well done, it's nice to hear great results.

293ba4c95d190bc616b27d85b10d705a

(661)

on January 08, 2012
at 08:54 PM

Not too bad considering how many carbs you ate

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 08, 2012
at 06:07 PM

Long term yes. Short term no. High blood sugar can send you into a coma and has to be dealt with immediately. A1C takes months to shift, but is a better indicator of recovery.

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on January 08, 2012
at 03:14 PM

congrats on your success

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on January 08, 2012
at 03:09 PM

Seriously? Not paleo, lots of carbs, no evidence backing....

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on January 08, 2012
at 03:08 PM

Seriously? Not paleo, full of phytates, lots of carbs, no evidence backing....

685e3c967e63b4eacccf02628fd9a3ac

(1026)

on January 08, 2012
at 11:50 AM

I'm never moody anymore, so I guess I don't have sugar crashes anymore.

Bfddc0ab925c8ea0e0c2e87198514907

on January 08, 2012
at 11:30 AM

Thanks. I'll look into that. Can you give me a quick explanation why?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 07, 2012
at 10:52 PM

Slightly different @melinda, since mine was probably triggered by adrenaline, but both show how emotions can trigger a measurable response on blood glucose.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 07, 2012
at 10:46 PM

134 at 2 hours. Over the hump and starting down. My best guess is that I ate 150-200g of carbs, so it's a pretty good load test. Fries have a GI of 75. Interesting, but I'm running out of strips so experiment over.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 07, 2012
at 10:22 PM

Thanks, Quilt! It is usually right at 88.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 07, 2012
at 10:15 PM

142 mg/dL at 90 minutes. That's a pretty good spike.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 07, 2012
at 09:53 PM

OK. I walked down to the pub for starch and got a one pound basket of fries and a green salad for lunch. It's one hour later and the blood glucose test is 96, retest 97. I haven't been sedentary for the last hour (estimate 300 cals burned on the 4 miles walked) but I rarely am if I'm eating high GI foods.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on January 07, 2012
at 09:51 PM

if you fasting BG is below 88 constantly you regained leptin control over liver by regaining control of PEPCK.

293ba4c95d190bc616b27d85b10d705a

(661)

on January 07, 2012
at 08:32 PM

i know my cortisol issues have effected my blood sugar

293ba4c95d190bc616b27d85b10d705a

(661)

on January 07, 2012
at 08:31 PM

this is encouraging!

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 07, 2012
at 08:22 PM

I was talking about something a little different. I didn't have a sugar spike, I had an anticipatory release of insulin that lowered my circulating glucose and gave me hypoglycemic symptoms.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 07, 2012
at 08:17 PM

I hadn't run a test for about 3 years, but the new Dr. gave me a free one. I used it a couple times, but not to see the size of a spike. Before meals was low 90's. I'll run one an hour after I eat some starchy food and see what I get.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 07, 2012
at 07:39 PM

Yes, and what is a typical post-prandial spike for you now?

Bfddc0ab925c8ea0e0c2e87198514907

on January 07, 2012
at 07:31 PM

How are you now with high GI foods?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 07, 2012
at 07:30 PM

I had a bad sugar spike triggered by an excited conversation. I can believe that thinking about food could do the same.

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9 Answers

3
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 07, 2012
at 06:52 PM

My experience matches yours almost exactly. What I don't know at this point is whether or not I have actually reversed/cured my pre-diabetic, leptin-resistant issues or whether I am in remission due to improved eating patterns.

I mean, I don't plan to go back to wheat and SAD to test it, but as far as I know if I did go back to my old practices I would return to poor health somewhere between eventually and immediately.

The fact that I now have very adverse reactions to wheat (although not sweets) might predict sooner rather than later.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 07, 2012
at 10:22 PM

Thanks, Quilt! It is usually right at 88.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on January 07, 2012
at 09:51 PM

if you fasting BG is below 88 constantly you regained leptin control over liver by regaining control of PEPCK.

1
De787530dd6cf65e2cd03ada9f4cd214

on January 08, 2012
at 06:29 PM

I followed the Zone (fairly loosely) for about a decade, and then went 80/20 primal for about 1.5 years. Despite decent adherence to these diet protocols over this period, and optimal postprandial BG levels, I discovered that my morning fasting BG levels were still consistently around 100-125 mg/dL, in the pre-diabetic (bordering on diabetic) range.

What it took for me to beat this was upping my intermittent fasting (I now do 2 24-hr fasts per week, and aim for 18-20 hr fasts on the other days; previously, it had been more like 14-hr fasts each day) and completely cutting out all grains and alcohol. Within 3 months, I discovered that my morning fasting BG had dropped to the low 60s! On subsequent days, I rechecked to confirm that this is now a persistent state. To see whether my body is now able to handle unfavorable carbs, I had a couple of alcoholic drinks and a portion of dessert in the evening, and measured my fasting BG the following morning: still in the 60s. My insulin levels, recently tested in bloodwork, are also good. A1C level is 5.1.

1
Cf4576cbcc44fc7f2294135609bce9e5

on January 08, 2012
at 07:15 AM

the only true measure of success is not a blood sugar test but a test called glycosylated hemoglobin or a more modern term hemoglobin A1c. A blood sugar is a transient snap shot of blood glucose, the A1c is an more of an average long term result.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 08, 2012
at 06:07 PM

Long term yes. Short term no. High blood sugar can send you into a coma and has to be dealt with immediately. A1C takes months to shift, but is a better indicator of recovery.

1
Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 07, 2012
at 07:27 PM

I was diagnosed T2 diabetic in early 2007, with 200 fasting blood glucose. Avoiding high GI foods got my blood sugar under control within a week or two, but I had to lose some weight to get out of the huge sugar spikes after eating. Even after losing about 20 lbs, a small portion of sushi rice would send my blood sugar up near 200.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 07, 2012
at 10:46 PM

134 at 2 hours. Over the hump and starting down. My best guess is that I ate 150-200g of carbs, so it's a pretty good load test. Fries have a GI of 75. Interesting, but I'm running out of strips so experiment over.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 07, 2012
at 09:53 PM

OK. I walked down to the pub for starch and got a one pound basket of fries and a green salad for lunch. It's one hour later and the blood glucose test is 96, retest 97. I haven't been sedentary for the last hour (estimate 300 cals burned on the 4 miles walked) but I rarely am if I'm eating high GI foods.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 07, 2012
at 08:17 PM

I hadn't run a test for about 3 years, but the new Dr. gave me a free one. I used it a couple times, but not to see the size of a spike. Before meals was low 90's. I'll run one an hour after I eat some starchy food and see what I get.

Bfddc0ab925c8ea0e0c2e87198514907

on January 07, 2012
at 07:31 PM

How are you now with high GI foods?

293ba4c95d190bc616b27d85b10d705a

(661)

on January 08, 2012
at 08:54 PM

Not too bad considering how many carbs you ate

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 09, 2012
at 01:11 PM

I ran one more test 5 hours after the meal and got a 79. If this is a control, then the increase from the fries/salad was 67, only slightly lower than the GI of the fries. So my glycemic response is in line with the test population.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 07, 2012
at 10:15 PM

142 mg/dL at 90 minutes. That's a pretty good spike.

96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on January 07, 2012
at 07:39 PM

Yes, and what is a typical post-prandial spike for you now?

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 07, 2012
at 06:53 PM

I started vlc in late 2007. For three years I carried around a small packet of Sweeties in case I would have a hypoglycemic attack (learned from http://diabetesupdate.blogspot.com/) The first 6 months or so were brutal when an attack happened. Even thinking about food could bring it on. I suspect I was hyper-secreting insulin when triggered by food smell or thoughts. It wore off and now when I get a trigger by food the insulin release is very small and short lived. I still own a packet of those small candies...

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on January 07, 2012
at 08:22 PM

I was talking about something a little different. I didn't have a sugar spike, I had an anticipatory release of insulin that lowered my circulating glucose and gave me hypoglycemic symptoms.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 07, 2012
at 07:30 PM

I had a bad sugar spike triggered by an excited conversation. I can believe that thinking about food could do the same.

293ba4c95d190bc616b27d85b10d705a

(661)

on January 07, 2012
at 08:32 PM

i know my cortisol issues have effected my blood sugar

Medium avatar

(10611)

on January 07, 2012
at 10:52 PM

Slightly different @melinda, since mine was probably triggered by adrenaline, but both show how emotions can trigger a measurable response on blood glucose.

0
B3173217a49b5b0116078775a17eb21d

(11488)

on January 10, 2013
at 12:06 AM

I've been a diabetic for nearly 2 years, during which time I have completely normalised my BG levels by low-carbing. I've reduced by HbA1c from 10.2% to 4.9% (which is better than most non-diabetics) and shed 70lbs.

The HbA1c numbers are great, but they are really a function of my Very Low Carb diet (<25g a day), and don't necessarily reflect a change in insulin resistance.

In order to give me a yearly benchmark, I decided to perform a DIY Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) every year on January 1st 2012. This year's test said that I was "pre-diabetic", unfortunately I don't have a comparison for diagnosis, but I hope to should a constant improvement year by year (as my weight reduces further) to the extent that I am no longer a diabetic.

If you want to do an OGTT, it's really quite simple. Step-by-step instructions here: http://www.eattoyourmeter.org/blog/diabetes-mot-the-diy-oral-glucose-tolerance-test/

0
35d947c8f8ae5e3478e76bbbba080e15

on January 09, 2013
at 11:54 PM

1, I read a research article reporting the same. In their clinical studies, type II didabetics became normal after a period of fasting. I really should try this. Thanks for posting your good result.

0
9dbfedbe21eae2a65093f8774ba8ad4d

on January 08, 2012
at 03:23 PM

I had a major sweet tooth that caused me to binge once or twice or week. My moods were crazy, not to mention my periods being unpredictable, constantly bloated and fatigued. I could just as well have dessert and not dinner. Occasionally I'd make a whole batch of rice crispie treats for myself (!), and yet I prided myself on avoiding red meat and eating whole grains, ugh.

I first lost about 15 lbs doing Weight Watchers and feeling starved all the time, not to mention IBS. Then I switched to a low-carb lacto-paleo diet and the pounds literally melted off due to ketosis. The fog lifted, my headaches went away. I had more energy than I needed, frankly. I started loading up on white rice and potatoes so my weight would stabilize. I've stayed in the same 5 lb. range since then (almost a year), no need to exercise like a madwoman or count my calories. I am lacto-paleo with an occasional cheat, like a chocolate bonbon or glass of beer. But my cravings have gone away and I only eat till satiated, which isn't much - tiny breakfast, moderate lunch and dinner. No more third helpings like before :)

C00e493393828df34be65ddc25456c7c

(610)

on January 09, 2012
at 09:14 AM

well done, it's nice to hear great results.

-3
84668cd6e26e4b9ccda01c5bef397f60

on January 08, 2012
at 06:24 AM

as you are in a pre-diabetic condition it is a good idea to follow brown rice diet. this is very helpful for the diabetic patients.

Bfddc0ab925c8ea0e0c2e87198514907

on January 08, 2012
at 11:30 AM

Thanks. I'll look into that. Can you give me a quick explanation why?

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on January 08, 2012
at 03:08 PM

Seriously? Not paleo, full of phytates, lots of carbs, no evidence backing....

Cf4576cbcc44fc7f2294135609bce9e5

(3125)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

why eat rice? it will cause diabetes. think how many diabetics eat rice in India, China.

5ccb98f6ae42ce87e206cf3f6a86039f

(11581)

on January 08, 2012
at 03:09 PM

Seriously? Not paleo, lots of carbs, no evidence backing....

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