17

votes

Is There Any Evidence that Saturated Fat is Necessary for Optimal Health?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 10, 2011 at 10:56 PM

Put down the torches and pitchforks for a second and hear me out.

The paleo movement these days seems to consider the notion that saturated fat is essential and healthful to be a truism. Surely an ancestral diet would contain a fair amount of it and we have had our fair share of evolutionary exposure to it over the millennia. As such, there's no legitimate case to be made regarding it's safety.

What I'm wondering however is whether someone trying to lose body fat can cut saturated fat out of their diets without any ill effects. The common knowledge answer that I run into a lot is that saturated fat gets "turned into" cholesterol, which becomes pregnenolone and then is the substrate for the sex-, stress-, corticosteroids and vitamin D. I looked into it though, and hepatic cholesterol synthesis uses acetyl-CoA, not saturated fat, as a substrate, though I suppose the metabolism of saturated fatty acids could contribute to the general pool of acetyl-CoA, though it wouldn't necessarily need to.

I hate to talk about dietary monoliths such as "saturated fat." What we're really talking about (in descending order of hypercholesterolemic potential) are myristic, palmitic, lauric and stearic acid. Stearic acid is converted to oleic acid (a monounsaturated fat) by the liver, so it has no effect on serum cholesterol concentrations. Interestingly, stearic acid was shown in the Nurse's Health Study to be more atherogenic than the other 3.

So, when you eat the first 3 fatty acids, it appears that they increase serum cholesterol by downregulating hepatic LDL receptors (in the presence of dietary cholesterol). This causes the serum pool of cholesterol to swell as, I assume, less is taken out of circulation by the liver and turned into bile etc.

Now, most of our cholesterol has an endogenous source, constructed of a molecule present in abundance with any diet containing sufficient calories. I wondered what the cholesterol level is of a person whose diet contain practically no dietary cholesterol (i.e. vegans). I had such a diet for 8 years (don't ask) and my cholesterol was about 143 toward the end of it. A study here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/1849932 shows the mean of a group of vegans to be a little over 130mg/dl. I tend to agree with Paul Jaminet that the optimal range is 200-240, so you'd likely be healthier than someone eating the SAD for other reasons, but you probably would die early.

So, I thought, a good proxy to examine for whether these vegans are producing enough cholesterol for health would be testosterone levels. Surely you couldn't have inadequate cholesterol circulating but still have acceptable sex hormones, right? Typically, in a time of scarcity, testosterone is the first thing to plummet. A study here: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2374537/ shows their free testosterone to be roughly the same as meat eaters. Indeed, my personal experience was that I had no problems with libido whatsoever (set a few PRs, truth be told) - but I digress.

Given all of this, what if, in order to reduce energy density in a fat loss protocol, one were to rely on lean meats and reduced saturated fat as much as possible while also focusing on dense sources of cholesterol that don't also contain a lot of fat, such as crustaceans of various types. Between endogenous production and dietary cholesterol, one would expect a serum cholesterol level well in excess of that achieved by a vegan, which I think ought to be sufficient for all involved biological processes.

I suppose a counter-argument would be that our bodies have evolved to "expect" that aforementioned hepatic LDL receptor downregulation, but it might simply be that the body requires extra cholesterol in that specific case order to cope with some aspect of a surge in saturated fat intake, otherwise I don't see why its clearance would be downregulated under that circumstance.

I feel like I'm missing something here, though, so let me know where I've strayed.

Edit: I just thought of the fact that lauric acid increases HDL significantly, but if you're eating macadamia nuts, you get a fair amount of it without getting much in the way of other saturates.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7314)

on August 11, 2011
at 07:12 PM

@Dean- is that cholesterol necessarily coming from blood cholesterol though?

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on August 11, 2011
at 07:00 PM

Does saturated fat indirectly increase myelination? "High cholesterol level is essential for myelin membrane growth." http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15793579

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on August 11, 2011
at 06:28 PM

A diet promoting myelination would be a revelation. But I think the amounts of saturated fat incorporated on a day to day basis are miniscule.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on August 11, 2011
at 06:24 PM

Travis - Regarding your "Edit"... that's great, because my macadamia nut tree in my backyard is BURSTING with mature nuts. They are starting to drop like rain every day now. Mmmmmm.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 11, 2011
at 04:00 PM

what do you guys know or think about Agatsten scores? A measure of arterial plaque. Here is an interesting blog post about butter reducing this guys... http://blog.sethroberts.net/2011/08/04/how-rare-my-heart-scan-improvement/

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 11, 2011
at 03:54 PM

That's a great point; I had always assumed that myelin sheaths were constructed of DHA and cholesterol, but it looks like there's quite a lot of saturated fat as well. Difficult to say what the turnover rate would be and what a proper intake of sat. fat might be as a result. The protocol I'm developing has a fair amount of hard-bolied eggs and some macadamia nuts, so it's likely sufficient.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 11, 2011
at 03:50 PM

If you want to keep your LDL within evolutionarily appropriate ranges, then tallow is a far better choice.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:51 PM

So tallow would be a better choice than butter(pastured or otherwise)?

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 11, 2011
at 04:55 AM

thhq: A standard vegan diet would have no cholesterol if you don't can't plant sterols and there should be precious little of those 3 fatty acids unless they were going heavy with palm/coconut oils. I'm allergic to those, so I never ate them. As such, I'm guessing that both factors lead to it.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 11, 2011
at 04:48 AM

The myristic and palmitic boost LDL, whereas stearic has no effect.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 11, 2011
at 04:48 AM

The myristic and palmitic boosts LDL, whereas stearic has no effect.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on August 11, 2011
at 04:35 AM

Could a case be made that fructose is less problematic with regard to triglyceride production in the absence (or at least significantly less) saturated fat? It's a nice thought, but it seems to me that the liver would churn out excess fructose into trigs regardless of sat fat. I'd be shocked that if I quit all fructose, changed nothing else from when I got that VAP done, and my HDL would spike and my LDL to go A. I just can't grapple with the notion that fruit from specifically whole foods only in the presence of a very nutrient dense diet of health fats/proteins/starch would be so damaging.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on August 11, 2011
at 04:33 AM

Perhaps, but honestly I think I got more fructose on SAD. The difference may be with the fact that I upped my sat fat intake significantly. This may be a game changer with regard to the importance of fructose consumption.

8949bf87b0e0aefcad10f29975e4fa2b

(8989)

on August 11, 2011
at 04:11 AM

Me too, I'll just watch and upvote. (do I need safety glasses?)

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:56 AM

Thanks....the other part I should have gotten into in the blog post was how cholesterol is required for neurotransmitter synthesis and release and really required for maintenance of the voltage potential of excitable membranes.....this reduces ATP needs and when you have decreased cholesterol in the brain it increases the need for ATP production and screws the mitochondria up more......the brain needs tons of sat fat for sure as a substrate

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:50 AM

Thanks for the vegan study link Travis, of which the handheld only let me see the abstract. I calculate LDL for this vegan group at 70, and found some corroboration on another site. I wonder whether this is due to lower dietary sat fat or cholesterol, and also how much due to being at healthy weight. How much butter is enough is something I'm thinking about at 120 LDL.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:47 AM

"but travis said" it led to LDL level increases given its myristic:palmitic acid ratio. Reveal your site quilt!

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:22 AM

great blog post! of course you lost me intermittently but I made it through and am really fascinated by ketogenic diets

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:22 AM

great blog post! of course you lost me intermittently throughout but I made it through and am really fascinated by ketogenic diets.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:14 AM

Butter has tons of butyric acid if it's pastured. Great for gut and liver

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:08 AM

Those are some off the top of my head.......

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:02 AM

Remember evolution provides for high 12carbon sat fats for humans in breast milk......of course it's optimal. Butyric acid is another example in the colon.....protects it by converting to omega three in the colon to decrease inflammation from the gut that lowers HDL.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:58 AM

MCT are optimal in all brain diseases and in leaky gut disease due to their benefits at liver and in brain. My blog yesterday really touches on why coconut oil and the ketogenic diet are optimal for brain disease.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:57 AM

Lcfa that are saturated are packaged in the intestinal wall with cholesterol into TG MCT sat fat go straight to liver and are burned immediately and can not be stored as TGs. This is why coconut oil raised HDL better than all other sat fats

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:50 AM

I'm still certain that you were underestimating fructose intake, which raised TGs, reduced particle size and depressed HDL, or that you are a particular individual who is *very* sensitive to fructose and must reduce it to nearly 0 as I do.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:50 AM

I'm still certain that you were underestimating fructose intake, which raised TGs, reduced particle size and depressed HDL, or that you are a particular individual who is very sensitive to fructose and must reduce it to nearly 0 as I do.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:48 AM

I'm still certain that you were underestimating fructose intake, which raised TGs, reduced particle size and depressed HDL.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:42 AM

Here's the deal though. What if pattern B LDL is more at risk for oxidation, but maybe my dietary choices would prevent that from be able to occur. With the amount of sat fat, mono fats, antioxidants, and non-toxic foods I eat, it is plausible that I could be fine, even for life. But I'm just speculating so I will remain diligent until I can bank on something with better footing.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:41 AM

I eat plenty of avocado, plenty of mac nuts, plenty of coconut oil too. I think my fructose *may* have caused the small dense pattern B LDL, but I'm skeptical of it because I know my food choices and I guarantee is so much better than 99% of everyone in America. I eat LOADS of foods that people swear by for strong HDL, and yet I am stuck with a whimpy 40. I think Masterjohn is correct that if the LDL receptor activity is low, HDL will be low as well, causing pattern B LDL.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:31 AM

My understanding is that the effect is largely neutral with regard to serum cholesterol, but if you, for example, replaced butter with avocado, you'd see a huge drop in serum cholesterol. As far as MUFAs go, 18:1 oleic acid is the only one we're talking about so anything from beef tallow to macadamias to avocado has the same monounsaturated fat.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:04 AM

sat fat leads to pattern B? I thought pattern A was the light and fluffy ones

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:02 AM

Do you know if the LDL lowering ability of oleic acid is unique to that acid in particular or is it all monounsat fats? Also, what type of monounsat fat is in avocado and should that have the same effect?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:01 AM

Sat fat leads to B and higher hdl levels

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:00 AM

Your line of thinking seems really good, especially for people losing weight. I remember, and appreciate your long post about the effects of different sat fats on cholesterol numbers. My current experiment is to eat lots of turmeric to up regulate my LDL receptors, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18704882 , lots of kelp granules to have enough iodine to keep my thyroid rockin, and continued intake of avocados for the monounsat fats to see if all of that can balance out the bacon/butter/coconut oil, etc.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:59 PM

Yeah, what I'm proposing would be within the standard paleo framework, like Cordain's paleo but with more starch and more dietary cholesterol.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:55 PM

Yeah, I think PUFAs and to a lesser extent carbs cold do the same http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8299884 and

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:50 PM

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14564088

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:49 PM

I think a small LDL particle size is mostly the result of fructose intake (and thus triglyceride amount)

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:48 PM

I think LDL particle size is mostly the result of fructose intake (and thus triglyceride amount).

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:31 PM

Are there other common pathways that create it?

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:07 PM

I appreciate the way you analyze this stuff! I'm gonna stay out of the ring at the moment but I look forward to what will surely be a lively discussion here!

  • Size75 avatar

    asked by

    (39831)
  • Views
    3.6K
  • Last Activity
    1283D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

6 Answers

8
510bdda8988ed0d4b0ec0b738b4edb73

(20898)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:21 AM

I always like to do the chemistry argument: your body can't interconvert saturated fatty acids, monounsaturated, or poly unsaturated. Basically the saturation is what it was when you ate it (you can change the lengths of the chains though). Your brain is in the neighborhood of 80% saturated fat. Therefore, I'd argue that saturated fat is essential to your health.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 11, 2011
at 03:54 PM

That's a great point; I had always assumed that myelin sheaths were constructed of DHA and cholesterol, but it looks like there's quite a lot of saturated fat as well. Difficult to say what the turnover rate would be and what a proper intake of sat. fat might be as a result. The protocol I'm developing has a fair amount of hard-bolied eggs and some macadamia nuts, so it's likely sufficient.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on August 11, 2011
at 06:28 PM

A diet promoting myelination would be a revelation. But I think the amounts of saturated fat incorporated on a day to day basis are miniscule.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7314)

on August 11, 2011
at 07:12 PM

@Dean- is that cholesterol necessarily coming from blood cholesterol though?

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on August 11, 2011
at 07:00 PM

Does saturated fat indirectly increase myelination? "High cholesterol level is essential for myelin membrane growth." http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15793579

2
76f3ead3aa977d876bcf3331d35a36e9

(4620)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:38 AM

Not evidence for saturated fat specifically, but ruminant fat may be extremely beneficial due to its content of conjugated linoleic acid (which may have potential weight loss benefits) and vitamins A and K2 (butterfat specifically).

Here's a somewhat relevant (and great) article in which the author gives an interesting take on the benefit of cholesterol-rich foods:

http://people.csail.mit.edu/seneff/why_statins_dont_really_work.html

My research has uncovered compelling evidence that the nutrient that is most crucially needed to protect the heart from atherosclerosis is cholesterol sulfate. The extensive literature review my colleagues and I have conducted to produce these two papers shows compellingly that the fatty deposits that build-up in the artery walls leading to the heart exist mainly for the purpose of extracting cholesterol from glycated small dense LDL particles and synthesizing cholesterol sulfate from it, providing the cholesterol sulfate directly to the heart muscle. The reason the plaque build-up occurs preferentially in the arteries leading to the heart is so that the heart muscle can be assured an adequate supply of cholesterol sulfate. In our papers, we develop the argument that the cholesterol sulfate plays an essential role in the caveolae in the lipid rafts, in mediating oxygen and glucose transport.

So perhaps getting adequate supplies of cholesterol and sulfur containing foods, such as eggs, liver, crustaceans, mollusks, onions and garlic, will persuade the body to stop forming plaques, which the author suggests are formed for macrophages to extract cholesterol sulfate.

1
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:02 AM

Travis: what about butter? you claim that its ratio of palmitic(or was it lauric) to myristic acids predispose one to higher LDL levels. Now you state that Stearic acid does this? So what fat source should I go with here(butter, tallow, ...)? Given lots of cholesterol(12 egg yolks, 7 oz. of liver every 2nd day+ beef+ butter) wouldn't this serve to counterbalance the damage as per your argument above? Do the MCTs in butter, et.al not get processed through the liver more efficiently and thus don't lower LDL levels(forgive my ignorance...)?

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:14 AM

Butter has tons of butyric acid if it's pastured. Great for gut and liver

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 11, 2011
at 04:48 AM

The myristic and palmitic boost LDL, whereas stearic has no effect.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:47 AM

"but travis said" it led to LDL level increases given its myristic:palmitic acid ratio. Reveal your site quilt!

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 11, 2011
at 04:48 AM

The myristic and palmitic boosts LDL, whereas stearic has no effect.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 11, 2011
at 03:50 PM

If you want to keep your LDL within evolutionarily appropriate ranges, then tallow is a far better choice.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:51 PM

So tallow would be a better choice than butter(pastured or otherwise)?

1
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:20 PM

Beta oxidation of fats leads to beaucoup Ach!

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:08 AM

Those are some off the top of my head.......

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:22 AM

great blog post! of course you lost me intermittently but I made it through and am really fascinated by ketogenic diets

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:31 PM

Are there other common pathways that create it?

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:22 AM

great blog post! of course you lost me intermittently throughout but I made it through and am really fascinated by ketogenic diets.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:57 AM

Lcfa that are saturated are packaged in the intestinal wall with cholesterol into TG MCT sat fat go straight to liver and are burned immediately and can not be stored as TGs. This is why coconut oil raised HDL better than all other sat fats

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:58 AM

MCT are optimal in all brain diseases and in leaky gut disease due to their benefits at liver and in brain. My blog yesterday really touches on why coconut oil and the ketogenic diet are optimal for brain disease.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:56 AM

Thanks....the other part I should have gotten into in the blog post was how cholesterol is required for neurotransmitter synthesis and release and really required for maintenance of the voltage potential of excitable membranes.....this reduces ATP needs and when you have decreased cholesterol in the brain it increases the need for ATP production and screws the mitochondria up more......the brain needs tons of sat fat for sure as a substrate

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 11, 2011
at 01:02 AM

Remember evolution provides for high 12carbon sat fats for humans in breast milk......of course it's optimal. Butyric acid is another example in the colon.....protects it by converting to omega three in the colon to decrease inflammation from the gut that lowers HDL.

0
485bcefe7f1f7a6df1a293a826bf6137

on August 11, 2011
at 05:46 PM

I have heard vegans claim that you don't need saturated fats in the diet because stored body fat can be broken down and then used for necessary processes.

0
64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:47 PM

As a long term diet, would this lead to a preponderance of pattern B LDL which may be atherogenic even at the lower levels?

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:49 PM

I think a small LDL particle size is mostly the result of fructose intake (and thus triglyceride amount)

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:04 AM

sat fat leads to pattern B? I thought pattern A was the light and fluffy ones

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:59 PM

Yeah, what I'm proposing would be within the standard paleo framework, like Cordain's paleo but with more starch and more dietary cholesterol.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on August 11, 2011
at 04:33 AM

Perhaps, but honestly I think I got more fructose on SAD. The difference may be with the fact that I upped my sat fat intake significantly. This may be a game changer with regard to the importance of fructose consumption.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25477)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:01 AM

Sat fat leads to B and higher hdl levels

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:50 AM

I'm still certain that you were underestimating fructose intake, which raised TGs, reduced particle size and depressed HDL, or that you are a particular individual who is *very* sensitive to fructose and must reduce it to nearly 0 as I do.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:50 PM

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14564088

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:42 AM

Here's the deal though. What if pattern B LDL is more at risk for oxidation, but maybe my dietary choices would prevent that from be able to occur. With the amount of sat fat, mono fats, antioxidants, and non-toxic foods I eat, it is plausible that I could be fine, even for life. But I'm just speculating so I will remain diligent until I can bank on something with better footing.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on August 11, 2011
at 04:35 AM

Could a case be made that fructose is less problematic with regard to triglyceride production in the absence (or at least significantly less) saturated fat? It's a nice thought, but it seems to me that the liver would churn out excess fructose into trigs regardless of sat fat. I'd be shocked that if I quit all fructose, changed nothing else from when I got that VAP done, and my HDL would spike and my LDL to go A. I just can't grapple with the notion that fruit from specifically whole foods only in the presence of a very nutrient dense diet of health fats/proteins/starch would be so damaging.

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18452)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:41 AM

I eat plenty of avocado, plenty of mac nuts, plenty of coconut oil too. I think my fructose *may* have caused the small dense pattern B LDL, but I'm skeptical of it because I know my food choices and I guarantee is so much better than 99% of everyone in America. I eat LOADS of foods that people swear by for strong HDL, and yet I am stuck with a whimpy 40. I think Masterjohn is correct that if the LDL receptor activity is low, HDL will be low as well, causing pattern B LDL.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:31 AM

My understanding is that the effect is largely neutral with regard to serum cholesterol, but if you, for example, replaced butter with avocado, you'd see a huge drop in serum cholesterol. As far as MUFAs go, 18:1 oleic acid is the only one we're talking about so anything from beef tallow to macadamias to avocado has the same monounsaturated fat.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:00 AM

Your line of thinking seems really good, especially for people losing weight. I remember, and appreciate your long post about the effects of different sat fats on cholesterol numbers. My current experiment is to eat lots of turmeric to up regulate my LDL receptors, http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18704882 , lots of kelp granules to have enough iodine to keep my thyroid rockin, and continued intake of avocados for the monounsat fats to see if all of that can balance out the bacon/butter/coconut oil, etc.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:48 PM

I think LDL particle size is mostly the result of fructose intake (and thus triglyceride amount).

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:50 AM

I'm still certain that you were underestimating fructose intake, which raised TGs, reduced particle size and depressed HDL, or that you are a particular individual who is very sensitive to fructose and must reduce it to nearly 0 as I do.

Medium avatar

(39831)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:48 AM

I'm still certain that you were underestimating fructose intake, which raised TGs, reduced particle size and depressed HDL.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 11, 2011
at 04:00 PM

what do you guys know or think about Agatsten scores? A measure of arterial plaque. Here is an interesting blog post about butter reducing this guys... http://blog.sethroberts.net/2011/08/04/how-rare-my-heart-scan-improvement/

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 10, 2011
at 11:55 PM

Yeah, I think PUFAs and to a lesser extent carbs cold do the same http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8299884 and

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on August 11, 2011
at 12:02 AM

Do you know if the LDL lowering ability of oleic acid is unique to that acid in particular or is it all monounsat fats? Also, what type of monounsat fat is in avocado and should that have the same effect?

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!