2

votes

Is it unhealthy to lose up to 8 lbs in my sleep on a regular basis?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 30, 2012 at 2:26 PM

I'm a diagnosed Celiac (8 months ago) who struggles with weight gain. I usually weigh around 132 when I go to bed and I lose between 4 and 8 lbs in my sleep on a regular basis. Wearing the same clothes/etc I'll go to bed weighing 132 and wake up weighing 124. The trend repeats every day. Is it just digestion/metabolism burning off food and water weight?

I'm not necessarily concerned with the weight loss in itself, although I am trying to gain weight without any success, but I do worry that it's a symptom of another underlying health problem.

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on July 02, 2012
at 02:51 PM

@AmandaLP: sure, but not a gallon--at least not on a regular basis. If there's credible research suggesting this much weight loss while sleeping is a common occurrence, I'd like to see it. The average person burns something like 80-120 calories/hour sleeping--about 1/4 a pound. Even double that, and it's only 1/2 a pound. Add to that 2lbs of persp./resp. water loss, and we're still only up to 2.5 lbs. I don't believe 8 lbs with no elimination--the math doesn't work. Faulty scale is most likely explanation. A scale can be consistent--and it can be consistently wrong.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on June 30, 2012
at 05:00 PM

Actually, you breathe out a lot of "weight.". It sounds weird, but When fat is burned, carbon dioxide is one of the byproducts, and gets sent out through the lungs. It's also why we can get "ketosis breath."

91882203467f64f68f25f58f1caeee68

(1017)

on June 30, 2012
at 04:52 PM

Thanks for the info. 8 is a very low frequent max so who knows what's going on there, but it's usually close to 6 which sounds like it's no concerning.

91882203467f64f68f25f58f1caeee68

(1017)

on June 30, 2012
at 04:31 PM

I'll have to see if it fluctuates more when I eat a big meal before I go to bed.

91882203467f64f68f25f58f1caeee68

(1017)

on June 30, 2012
at 04:31 PM

I weigh myself before and after using the toilet, and that doesn't change my weight much. It's possible it's an unreliable scale, although it's only months old and one of those fancy digital ones. It's at least consistent, meaning if I weigh myself 5 times in a row it comes out around the same within a lb (i.e. 124.5, 124.8, 124.3).

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5 Answers

3
Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on June 30, 2012
at 02:32 PM

This may be helpful:

http://paindatabase.com/weighing/

2
21fd060d0796fdb8a4a990441e08eae7

(24543)

on June 30, 2012
at 04:29 PM

Hidy ho.

In browsing articles to write up the post Mike T referenced below, I found that the maximum typical amount lost in an overnight sleep-fast is about 6 pounds.

Therefore, as someone else said below, it might be scale error. Otherwise, it's probably sweat, pee, and poop. You burn quite few calories while sleeping, but some people have larger bladder volumes than typical. But you can sweat out and pee out a substantial amount, and a liter of water weighs 2.2 lbs. And since it's summer, people sweat more. You dig?

Also, some people have a larger discrepency between their morning and evening bodyweight than the average Joe/Jane, seemingly even controlling for other stuff. Isn't that weird?! I think this comes from studies that didn't measure fluid lost from breathing at night. Anyways, you maybe should check another scale. But ~2-6 pounds is probably not that worrisome. 8 is a little weird, especially on a regular basis.

91882203467f64f68f25f58f1caeee68

(1017)

on June 30, 2012
at 04:52 PM

Thanks for the info. 8 is a very low frequent max so who knows what's going on there, but it's usually close to 6 which sounds like it's no concerning.

2
A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on June 30, 2012
at 03:49 PM

Are you weighing yourself straight out of bed or after using the toilet?

Even "burning" food while you sleep, unless you eliminate something (like bodily waste), the weight of the food's components is still part of your mass. The main thing that can be eliminated without using the toilet is water, via perspiration and respiration.

One pint of water weighs roughly 1 lb. If you're literally losing weight in your sleep (and not using the toilet), then the only other routes I can see are perspiration and respiration. And I find it rather hard to imagine losing nearly a gallon of fluids this way. I doubt you could lose this much fluid during intense or endurance exercise--the dehydration would be intolerable. A couple of pounds, perhaps, but not 8. So it starts to seem rather unlikely you could experience this in your sleep.

The most likely culprit is an unreliable scale.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on June 30, 2012
at 05:00 PM

Actually, you breathe out a lot of "weight.". It sounds weird, but When fat is burned, carbon dioxide is one of the byproducts, and gets sent out through the lungs. It's also why we can get "ketosis breath."

91882203467f64f68f25f58f1caeee68

(1017)

on June 30, 2012
at 04:31 PM

I weigh myself before and after using the toilet, and that doesn't change my weight much. It's possible it's an unreliable scale, although it's only months old and one of those fancy digital ones. It's at least consistent, meaning if I weigh myself 5 times in a row it comes out around the same within a lb (i.e. 124.5, 124.8, 124.3).

A7768b6c6be7f5d6acc76e5efa66464c

on July 02, 2012
at 02:51 PM

@AmandaLP: sure, but not a gallon--at least not on a regular basis. If there's credible research suggesting this much weight loss while sleeping is a common occurrence, I'd like to see it. The average person burns something like 80-120 calories/hour sleeping--about 1/4 a pound. Even double that, and it's only 1/2 a pound. Add to that 2lbs of persp./resp. water loss, and we're still only up to 2.5 lbs. I don't believe 8 lbs with no elimination--the math doesn't work. Faulty scale is most likely explanation. A scale can be consistent--and it can be consistently wrong.

1
04de84913ef0d099f357033bf7fb7e6b

on June 30, 2012
at 03:33 PM

I usually have the same phenomena happen. Usually when I eat a ton of food before I go to bed though.

91882203467f64f68f25f58f1caeee68

(1017)

on June 30, 2012
at 04:31 PM

I'll have to see if it fluctuates more when I eat a big meal before I go to bed.

0
60af23519906aa54b742ffc17477c3d3

(1186)

on June 30, 2012
at 05:16 PM

I am in the same boat. I've heard that it is poor digestion, which makes sense if you haven't been gluten free all that long to start with.

Any experience with digestive enzymes?

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