13

votes

Is exercise effective for weight loss?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created June 19, 2011 at 1:11 AM

In GCBC, Taubes states that the only effective way to lose weight is to reduce carbs. He claims that exercise has minimal effects as a weight loss tool and has been shown to fail in controlled trials. However, I personally know plenty of people who have lost weight by exercising, all while upping their carb intake.

One explanation that comes to mind is that exercise improves insulin sensitivity. That would fit in with Taube's general principles, but he nevertheless says explicitly that exercise does not work.

Thoughts?

Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 13, 2013
at 05:27 PM

Run the Harris Benedict model to see exactly what age does. I lose burn at 5 cal/day per year. Over the 40 years since I was a young man I've lost the ability to metabolize 200 calories per day.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 13, 2013
at 05:24 PM

Exercise is a good boredom and hunger killer. But it also increases metabolism instantaneously, which burns calories, which causes weight loss. Eating does not stimulate metabolism the way exercise does.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 13, 2013
at 05:22 PM

Oprah Winfrey is exactly the type of example Taubes would come up with. Where's Jack Lalanne? He didn't eat Garrett's caramel corn between reps like the big O does.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 13, 2013
at 05:20 PM

Same here. 25 lbs came off with mainly dietary restriction, 25 lbs came off with mainly walking.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 13, 2013
at 05:19 PM

No that's not true. He comes straight out and says that exercise is not of any benefit, and cites examples to back up his story. But in his usual dissembling manner, he does not mention Jack Lalanne or anyone else that contradicts his lie.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 13, 2013
at 05:15 PM

If you're fat diet helps most. If you're not exercise helps most.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 13, 2013
at 05:13 PM

As always, Taubes is wrong. He says it because he is an Atkin's acolyte, and exercise doesn't fit the ketogenic model. Why it takes him so long dissembling is beyond me. It may some make people think he's smart. But if you look at 1990's photos of Dr. Atkins you get a good idea of what a ketogenic sedentary lifestyle will turn you into. It bears no resemblance to Jack Lalanne.

922038b6c0ca6a051cc4858218931456

(392)

on June 29, 2011
at 12:28 PM

FWIW, speaking in regards to Katie, when I attended a clinic in middle school with her shortly out of OSU and when the ABL still existed, prior to the WNBA, she was significantly more lean than she appears in the above picture.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 21, 2011
at 05:18 PM

@Ben61820: I seriously doubt that Cheryl's "goal" is to weigh 300 pounds. Unless she's a very, very unusual person, I think it would be safe to presume that she'd like to weigh less, and have less body fat.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 21, 2011
at 04:16 PM

Nice summary of Taubes's presentation. Thank you.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 21, 2011
at 04:12 PM

Shari, excellent response. My experience has been that despite exercising regularly over the decades (always had a gym membership, did lots of weight machines, etc.), my weight responded to diet, period. Not that exercise had no other benefits, but weight loss wasn't one of them for me. Others have had different experiences. There's clearly more going on than anyone's current understanding can elucidate; we'll just have to get better science in this area.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 21, 2011
at 04:04 PM

This is one of those places where theory really isn't consistent with reality. Some people swear exercising helps them lose weight. I have had a different experience -- diet alone has influenced my weight over the decades (yes, it's possible to control for the variables). Clearly the real-world results are not one size fits all. Arguing over theoretical issues is useless at the moment -- the reality is that different people have different results, and we just plain don't know why.

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on June 21, 2011
at 12:14 PM

+1 for bringing up the other benefits of exercise that indirectly affect weight! Sometimes I eat because I'm bored, or irritated, or just tired and looking for a boost. A run solves all that, and I'm far more likely to go for a run for that needed boost if I've already been running for a while. If "exercise" was not already a part of my life, I'd probably reach for the junk far more often.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 21, 2011
at 03:39 AM

Yep; my experience as well. I've exercised all my adult life, gaining and losing weight, and what made the difference was diet. Having said that, though, I've got to point out that he doesn't say the *only* effective way to lose is reducing carbs. It's easy to miss it, but in a couple of places in GCBC he gives the nod to other causes of overweight and obesity, and in those cases, carb reduction will obviously not be the solution, even though it might not hurt anything. But it's true that he's mostly addressing contemporary, common obesity, not special medical cases.

D687712302e0103ea52615eefc94d102

(396)

on June 20, 2011
at 06:04 PM

+1 Josh, thanks so much for this comment. It is EXACTLY how I talked myself off a ledge yesterday when I weighed myself. I'll just admit it, I want a quick fix. After eating paleo for 7 weeks and weighing myself yesterday and being shocked that my weight had not gone down, I was considering tossing in the towel. BUT, I had a talk with myself (with the help of my housemates) and was reminded that I am on a path to change my *lifestyle* not just the number on the scale. I've got a lifetime of hormone imbalance and metabolic derangement to address here... the weight loss will come later.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on June 20, 2011
at 02:38 PM

I ran 20-25 miles a week in my youth and didn't lose a damn thing. Taubes is correct - diet is much more important than exercise.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on June 20, 2011
at 02:36 PM

Taubes is primarily referencing studies that show that exercise is not effective for weight loss. He never suggests that it isn't healthy or beneficial. The science is what it is - exercise is not an effective strategy for weight loss. (Why? Because it's 90% what you eat that matters.)

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 19, 2011
at 10:04 PM

Animalecule, well I think I can agree with what you say. But again I would say that at least Katie and Cheryl prove that exercise may have no impact on fat accumulation on the body. Clearly exercise does not make you thin. If we buy into the premise that exercise is effective in weight loss then one wouldn't expect to see much fat accumulation on the body as clearly Olympic athletes are exercising quite a bit. Unless I was told that Cheryl use to weigh 400 lbs and now weighs 300 lbs because of exercise I think this may be a good example of what Taubes asserts.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 19, 2011
at 09:47 PM

Just a few inches of height can make a huge difference in a person's success within the top echelon of a sport; Svetlana, at 5'5", was told she would never get far in gymnastics due to her relative tallness and created many of her own moves because she couldn't perform the same routines shorter girls could! There is a huge advantage for those who have the required body type naturally.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 19, 2011
at 09:42 PM

I think what it illustrates is that all of those women have probably been close to that size and shape most of their lives (I would bet if you looked at each of them as a girl of 10 you'd be able to pick out who is who), and yet each is uniquely equipped for success at the sport they've excelled at, and are surrounded by competitors of roughly similar sizes and body types. There's about as much chance that someone like Katie could starve herself to 110 lbs in order to be competitive in distance running, as there is that 5'1" Jennifer could excel at basketball.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 19, 2011
at 06:43 PM

But clearly one who can obtain olympic athletic status is exercising. No? The issue is exercise in general not specific training programs. Even in the paleo community there seems to be this assumption that if you just go do some exercise you will become thin and that's just not true. You will become fit but you may or may not become thin. You can actually stay quite fat.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 19, 2011
at 05:00 PM

Sounds pithy but the proof is in the pudding. Anyone who works their body regularly, is fit and active and conscious about it knows the answer: yes of course exercise will shed weight, if that is your goal and you choose the right one. Do it yourself and find out.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 19, 2011
at 04:58 PM

Well all this pic illustrates actually is that people with different goals train and eat in different ways that form their body into a shape that they want for their goal. It does not actually say anything about how certain exercise may or may not make someone a size 2, or a size 12.

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on June 19, 2011
at 04:19 PM

+1 - "There is not a one size fits all answer for exercise." YES!

87045f8a1619c15c66b00c533b00df87

(114)

on June 19, 2011
at 03:33 AM

I realize I wasn't specific enough. My experience is with 2 types of exercise: 1. Wrestling. I was a very serious wrestler in high school. Almost everyone who joined the team lost fat and gained muscle even if they weren't trying to cut weight. 2. Cardio. I agree that it's worthless, but I know some people (mostly my mom's middle-aged friends) who have lost fat simply by hitting the elliptical and joining aerobics classes.

C3edabc6267abec9b5f8178e5d73552c

(725)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:21 AM

I dont see how something that can increase your body's HGH production as much as a max squat or deadlift set can be said to not affect weight loss... Even if it does increase your appetite, it won't be stored as fat. Taubes assumes that exercise means slogging away hours on the elliptical

5c46aa85871c36b5e263456aaf4053f8

(193)

on June 19, 2011
at 01:59 AM

I can't say if my weight loss was from exercise or diet (started paleo about twelve months after starting regular exercise) but I seem to recall reading recently that a pound of muscle burns about 50 calories a day just resting. From this perspective lifting would be awesome, but that's of course also assuming that your diet isn't completely out of control.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 19, 2011
at 01:47 AM

Excellent answer. GCBC is a great book but his stance regarding exercise is just not very well put in the book. Exercise firstly means nothing as a word. It is wholly dependent on what activity you do. And losing "weight" means nothing. What weight: fat stores, muscle mass? You starve yourself you'll lose weight. Lot of muscle. You loft heavy classic barbell stuff and eat big you'll gain weight, it'll be mostlymsucle. In the beginning you'll lose fat stores too, while your whole body weight goes north. Too complicated for his purposes in the book.

0dbd7154d909b97fe774d1655754f195

(16131)

on June 19, 2011
at 01:34 AM

Great question, I'm down here with B-Bitch because I'm just guessing. Weight loss is a little arbitrary isn't it? What is it we are aiming to lose? Starvation diets and no exercise are great for lowering scale number. Resistance exercise increases insulin sensitivity as you say, but it also activates GLUT4 which allows for glucose uptake without insulin. So Taubes claims carbs and the resulting insulin result in fat gain. If resistance exercise allows for insulin-free glucose uptake, then it must have some merit.

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on June 19, 2011
at 01:25 AM

Muscle burns fat. Right? (my personal experience is that I lost more fat/gained more muscle lifting) I'm not providing an answer as I'm not qualified but I'm really glad you asked this. I bet you'll get some great answers. However, you may want to clarify exercise type. It is a very general statement.

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17 Answers

13
776bb678d88f7194b0fa0e5146df14f0

on June 19, 2011
at 01:30 AM

I think that Taubes is wrong in this respect, and that he takes this position just to fortify himself from the "calories in, calories out" crowd. Neither position is right - exercise doesn't just expend calories, and that's probably why exercise trials would fail if they were specifically accounting for that. Given the right environment of lowered blood sugar and inflammation, exercise seems to increase insulin sensitivity, and ALSO decrease cortisol and stress if done correctly. There seems to be a sweet spot for having enough cardio/resistance training to help, and overtraining to get more cortisol than before. I have heard a lot of ancecdotal stories about type II diabetics improving their condition by just walking a mile or so a day. I believe that Taubes was specifically trying to combat people that promote exercise as decreasing CALORIES in the balance. This does not work, in my opinion.

However, through its effects on insulin and hormones like testosterone, exercise seems to affect the "carb set point" with how many carbs an individual can eat without disturbing their weight. I think the settings on the control have to do with how healthy/deranged one's metabolism is, both through genetics and past experiences - formerly obese people sometimes find that they cannot eat ANY carbs without gaining weight. I personally enjoy eating a good amount of carbs, so I work in extra exercise to combat that.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 19, 2011
at 01:47 AM

Excellent answer. GCBC is a great book but his stance regarding exercise is just not very well put in the book. Exercise firstly means nothing as a word. It is wholly dependent on what activity you do. And losing "weight" means nothing. What weight: fat stores, muscle mass? You starve yourself you'll lose weight. Lot of muscle. You loft heavy classic barbell stuff and eat big you'll gain weight, it'll be mostlymsucle. In the beginning you'll lose fat stores too, while your whole body weight goes north. Too complicated for his purposes in the book.

A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on June 20, 2011
at 02:36 PM

Taubes is primarily referencing studies that show that exercise is not effective for weight loss. He never suggests that it isn't healthy or beneficial. The science is what it is - exercise is not an effective strategy for weight loss. (Why? Because it's 90% what you eat that matters.)

Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 13, 2013
at 05:15 PM

If you're fat diet helps most. If you're not exercise helps most.

7
7cf45aaa9478fcef7dd16914088ce480

on June 19, 2011
at 02:19 AM

My takeaway from GCBC was that burning off excess calories by focusing primarily on exercise, or "calories burned", was not effective. Taubes stated several times that the keystone to weight management came through diet.

In the past I have been able to loose weight through chronic exercise on a SAD (biking, 4+ mile walks, and resistance training). If you read my blog, the earlier posts reflect the frustration it takes to sustain this. However, since going paleo AND maintaining my fitness routine I was able to shed almost 35 lbs in three months without counting calories and what not. You can read me transitional post here if you care --> http://notinmoderation.wordpress.com/2011/06/08/what-is-going-on-here/

Anyway, I strongly believe exercise is effective for weight loss. But I agree with Taubes- get your diet in order first.

One last thing on exercise and weight loss-- walk in the morning before eating breakfast. I walk to work and eat breakfast when I arrive. I attribute fasted walking to much of my fat/weight loss.

Ryan Wilder

Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 13, 2013
at 05:20 PM

Same here. 25 lbs came off with mainly dietary restriction, 25 lbs came off with mainly walking.

6
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on June 20, 2011
at 02:11 PM

When I exercise regularly, I find it much easier to stick to a good diet, avoid snacks, have much better moods and sleep better. I sometimes joke that I want to have either a bowl of ice cream or a 3 mile run, because I feel the same feeling of satisfaction after both.

I don't think that exercise helps you lose weight in a calorie burning sense. But I suspect it helps a LOT with your insulin response and other factors that affect your health such as cortisol and inflammation, and controlling these things is what helps you to lose weight.

If you DON'T exercise regularly, I think it is much easier to turn to food for stress relief, satisfaction, entertainment, etc. which makes food and eating an unhealthy emphasis in your life, which causes you to gain weight.

27e79ef3308bb5f2d7bd04ee7eea7b79

(2038)

on June 21, 2011
at 12:14 PM

+1 for bringing up the other benefits of exercise that indirectly affect weight! Sometimes I eat because I'm bored, or irritated, or just tired and looking for a boost. A run solves all that, and I'm far more likely to go for a run for that needed boost if I've already been running for a while. If "exercise" was not already a part of my life, I'd probably reach for the junk far more often.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 13, 2013
at 05:24 PM

Exercise is a good boredom and hunger killer. But it also increases metabolism instantaneously, which burns calories, which causes weight loss. Eating does not stimulate metabolism the way exercise does.

4
3f8d3260cfa33caf9c2b5d12b99864ef

on June 20, 2011
at 01:18 PM

I'm in my fifties, and I have gone thru various periods in recent years of loads of cardio, then no cardio, then loads of walking (walking the dogs 2- 3 miles plus per day) to very little walking... The only formal exercise I do is HIT style weight training. Other than that, its dog walking and also surfing or skiing when I can. And my weight stays pretty much the same no matter what. The only way I can make the scale go down is by carefully watching how much I eat. An oh, yeah I have been low carbing for almost ten years now.

When I was in my twenties, I went thru a phase that lasted a couple of years where I did about 90 mins of running/swimming/cycling at least 5 days a week. I even participated in a few triathlons. During that time I ate whatever I felt like and I went from being a bit chubby to pretty darn lean.

Go figure. Maybe its an age related hormone thing. What worked for me as a young man doesn't work at all now that I am a bit older.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 13, 2013
at 05:27 PM

Run the Harris Benedict model to see exactly what age does. I lose burn at 5 cal/day per year. Over the 40 years since I was a young man I've lost the ability to metabolize 200 calories per day.

4
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25472)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:43 PM

The answer depends upon the persons current hormone status. Oprah Winfrey is not effective burning fat with exercise as say Martin is from leangains. There is not a one size fits all answer for exercise.

Cbb1134f8e93067d1271c97bb2e15ef6

on June 19, 2011
at 04:19 PM

+1 - "There is not a one size fits all answer for exercise." YES!

Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 13, 2013
at 05:22 PM

Oprah Winfrey is exactly the type of example Taubes would come up with. Where's Jack Lalanne? He didn't eat Garrett's caramel corn between reps like the big O does.

4
66974b2cb291799dcd661b7dec99a9e2

(11121)

on June 19, 2011
at 05:36 AM

The main goal should be to attain overall good 'health' not limit oneself to just losing weight. Trouble is we live in an instant gratification society and people want to lose weight right now, they do not want to put the time and effort into a lifestyle change that can take months, even years to develop a healthy body with a normal, healthy metabolism that will usually get us to a weight that we may be genetically programmed for. People constantly think they know better than nature does, we get some arbitrary number fixated in our minds about what we want to weigh then we fight against what nature is trying to accomplish and end up thinking we failed. Humans are typically narrow-minded and egotistical and are rarely satisfied.

D687712302e0103ea52615eefc94d102

(396)

on June 20, 2011
at 06:04 PM

+1 Josh, thanks so much for this comment. It is EXACTLY how I talked myself off a ledge yesterday when I weighed myself. I'll just admit it, I want a quick fix. After eating paleo for 7 weeks and weighing myself yesterday and being shocked that my weight had not gone down, I was considering tossing in the towel. BUT, I had a talk with myself (with the help of my housemates) and was reminded that I am on a path to change my *lifestyle* not just the number on the scale. I've got a lifetime of hormone imbalance and metabolic derangement to address here... the weight loss will come later.

4
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on June 19, 2011
at 01:43 AM

My recollection is that Taubes wasn't saying that exercise didn't work in and of itself. He was saying it doesn't work for weight loss because it increases your appetite and you eat more calories, offsetting the benefit. This assumes, of course, that you actually do eat more and can't control yourself.

C3edabc6267abec9b5f8178e5d73552c

(725)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:21 AM

I dont see how something that can increase your body's HGH production as much as a max squat or deadlift set can be said to not affect weight loss... Even if it does increase your appetite, it won't be stored as fat. Taubes assumes that exercise means slogging away hours on the elliptical

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 21, 2011
at 04:04 PM

This is one of those places where theory really isn't consistent with reality. Some people swear exercising helps them lose weight. I have had a different experience -- diet alone has influenced my weight over the decades (yes, it's possible to control for the variables). Clearly the real-world results are not one size fits all. Arguing over theoretical issues is useless at the moment -- the reality is that different people have different results, and we just plain don't know why.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on March 13, 2013
at 05:19 PM

No that's not true. He comes straight out and says that exercise is not of any benefit, and cites examples to back up his story. But in his usual dissembling manner, he does not mention Jack Lalanne or anyone else that contradicts his lie.

3
4440e7b86496c008ddad3b49c425f463

on June 21, 2011
at 03:32 AM

I think Taubes is referring to "studies" that have failed to demonstrate a reliable effect of weight-loss with exercise alone. If you agree with his observation that fat gain is hormonally controlled horizontal growth, just as height is hormonally controlled vertical growth, then energy expenditure also is affected by hormonal changes. When one begins to re-acquire the correct hormonal balance (reduction of insulin / normalization of blood sugar), energy begins to spontaneously increase along with activity. Fat gain and the resulting slowing of metabolism and energy expenditure / activity are simply the effects of hormonal derangement.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 21, 2011
at 04:16 PM

Nice summary of Taubes's presentation. Thank you.

3
98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

on June 19, 2011
at 04:12 PM

I am seriously torn on this subject. I think the way Taubes framed the exercise issue is misleading or a half-truth of some sort. Not intentionally though. I just think we don't have all the pieces of the puzzle quite yet. I certainly think those who interpret his comments to mean that exercise is pointless for weight loss are wrong. It seems to me it could very well for at least some people optimize the body systems so that is can more easily lose fat. It certainly is not a given that exercise begets fat loss though.

I love this illustration of the point. Each one of these women is an Olympic athlete. Unless you have the build for it, exercise won't magically make you a size 2. This I know to be true.

is-exercise-effective-for-weight-loss?

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 19, 2011
at 10:04 PM

Animalecule, well I think I can agree with what you say. But again I would say that at least Katie and Cheryl prove that exercise may have no impact on fat accumulation on the body. Clearly exercise does not make you thin. If we buy into the premise that exercise is effective in weight loss then one wouldn't expect to see much fat accumulation on the body as clearly Olympic athletes are exercising quite a bit. Unless I was told that Cheryl use to weigh 400 lbs and now weighs 300 lbs because of exercise I think this may be a good example of what Taubes asserts.

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on June 19, 2011
at 04:58 PM

Well all this pic illustrates actually is that people with different goals train and eat in different ways that form their body into a shape that they want for their goal. It does not actually say anything about how certain exercise may or may not make someone a size 2, or a size 12.

98bf2ca7f8778c79cd3f6c962011cfdc

(24286)

on June 19, 2011
at 06:43 PM

But clearly one who can obtain olympic athletic status is exercising. No? The issue is exercise in general not specific training programs. Even in the paleo community there seems to be this assumption that if you just go do some exercise you will become thin and that's just not true. You will become fit but you may or may not become thin. You can actually stay quite fat.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 19, 2011
at 09:42 PM

I think what it illustrates is that all of those women have probably been close to that size and shape most of their lives (I would bet if you looked at each of them as a girl of 10 you'd be able to pick out who is who), and yet each is uniquely equipped for success at the sport they've excelled at, and are surrounded by competitors of roughly similar sizes and body types. There's about as much chance that someone like Katie could starve herself to 110 lbs in order to be competitive in distance running, as there is that 5'1" Jennifer could excel at basketball.

26b7615ef542394102785a67a2786867

(7967)

on June 19, 2011
at 09:47 PM

Just a few inches of height can make a huge difference in a person's success within the top echelon of a sport; Svetlana, at 5'5", was told she would never get far in gymnastics due to her relative tallness and created many of her own moves because she couldn't perform the same routines shorter girls could! There is a huge advantage for those who have the required body type naturally.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 21, 2011
at 04:12 PM

Shari, excellent response. My experience has been that despite exercising regularly over the decades (always had a gym membership, did lots of weight machines, etc.), my weight responded to diet, period. Not that exercise had no other benefits, but weight loss wasn't one of them for me. Others have had different experiences. There's clearly more going on than anyone's current understanding can elucidate; we'll just have to get better science in this area.

3aea514b680d01bfd7573d74517946a7

(11996)

on June 21, 2011
at 05:18 PM

@Ben61820: I seriously doubt that Cheryl's "goal" is to weigh 300 pounds. Unless she's a very, very unusual person, I think it would be safe to presume that she'd like to weigh less, and have less body fat.

922038b6c0ca6a051cc4858218931456

(392)

on June 29, 2011
at 12:28 PM

FWIW, speaking in regards to Katie, when I attended a clinic in middle school with her shortly out of OSU and when the ABL still existed, prior to the WNBA, she was significantly more lean than she appears in the above picture.

2
Medium avatar

(10611)

on June 29, 2011
at 03:13 AM

Weight loss is a discipline. Diet can help, exercise can help, but it doesn't happen by accident. In losing 50 lbs I saw more benefit from diet when obese and more benefit from exercise when nearing healthy weight. Exercise also had the effect of doubling my HDL even before starting weight loss.

Why Taubes would denigrate exercise is beyond me. Msybe I misunderstand what he's saying.

1
0756554e2dd963b66ad62702cbc62a67

on June 19, 2011
at 01:05 PM

All I know is that I feel like crap while working out if I eat crap before a high-intensity workout (CrossFit). So I eat right. Win-win.

1
1f8384be58052b6b96f476e475abdc74

(2231)

on June 19, 2011
at 03:01 AM

more muscle= better glucose disposal= higher energy requirements= better hormonal balance= more leptin sensitive= more insulin sensitive=.....you get the idea. cardio= fail

1
1a98a40ba8ffdc5aa28d1324d01c6c9f

(20378)

on June 19, 2011
at 02:37 AM

Exercise will aid in weight loss when you are eating the correct type and amounts of food.

A low carb diet and walking for 30 min/day five times a week is good enough for a start.

You can increase to add weight lifting and change walking to interval aerobics. Once your workout exceeds 45 minutes cortisol kicks in leading to muscle loss.

Folks that over train on cardio loose muscle. Hampering their weight loss goals.

0
F2054b0bf33820c76e5ff0f272c15117

on March 13, 2013
at 05:19 PM

Depends on the hormone balance, or inbalance of each person. Me, for example, did not benefit from exercise alone. I was working out 2 hours a day to no avail--I'd lose and regain the same 10lbs. I was then diagnosed with PCOS and since then have been eating Paleo and exercising and have seen vast improvements.

0
32652cb696b75182cb121009ee4edea3

(5802)

on March 13, 2013
at 05:11 PM

One thing that Taubes does not really distinguish (and which we often bring up on PH) is that there are 2 different kinds of weight loss:

(1) weight loss of the OBESE down to a reasonable weight

(2) weight loss of those at REASONABLE weight down to IDEAL weight

In my own experience, and I am sure many others, these are 2 separate beasts. Those who are obese can easily lose weight on diet alone when the biochemistry of their body is corrected (insulin, cortisol, other hormones, etc).

Those who are not obese, but trying to achieve an ideal number in their head, will find that diet alone isn't enough. They need to start building muscle. And maybe counting calories.
Some will say that at this point the person has left "health reasons" and moved into "vanity reasons" to lose weight. Some will say that we are simply striving to live up to the potential our bodies would have if we were living the way we evolved to live. I think both ideas have merit.

My takeaway from Taubes was that none of this is as simple as conventional wisdom makes it (calories in / calories out). He really opened a pandora's box of possible routes future research could take ... I only hope some of those in possession of research funds will take these ideas and run with them!

0
77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on March 13, 2013
at 04:14 PM

Fitness, diet and active lifestyle does it best! When I feel lack of energy or feel too tired to go to the gym I am taking Navy Seal Formula manufactutred by MGNutritionals. This dietary supplement makes me quickly recharged. As a result - I am in the best shape of my life.

-2
Ee53190da5d2e601a12dc3f1bb5c083a

on March 10, 2013
at 03:54 AM

The best workout for losing weight aside form a good diet is walking. Walk 3 days a week for like an hour eahc day. Also, drink lots of water. Heres some more tips if your interested, just basic everyday stuff you can do to help.

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