3

votes

If food reward... Why not milk diets?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created August 16, 2011 at 2:04 AM

Anyone have an opinion on this? That study where the participants consumed a bland, repetitive liquid diet where all the lean people maintained their weight but the overweight and obese lost... If it were down to food reward, wouldn't the same results be seen if someone were to consume only milk? If you don't see the same results, wouldn't that say something about milk?

I was thinking that it would be definitive as to whether or not milk prevents or slows weight loss, would be to try a diet that would essentially resemble the one used in the study. If there is some inherently fattening property in milk, you should see it in the differences in weight loss, especially considering the liquid used was high in sugar and would probably have similar effects on insulin levels (I'm guessing here, taking from Pedro Bastos' lecture). I was also thinking that its failure might say something about food reward, that it might indicate that restricting palatability cannot overcome other factors (high insulin index foods? Micronutrient deficiency? Milk induced hormone imbalance? Opioid effect of dairy?)

Has anyone ever tried a milk diet without trying to force calories? I remember a while back Matt Stone tried a milk only diet, but it was regimented and you were supposed to control the amount you consumed, something like 6-8QTs/day, so I don't think that counts.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 24, 2011
at 06:50 PM

And feel free to contact me via email if you any questions/issues/problems.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 24, 2011
at 06:49 PM

Ah yes, for "beautification" purposes, something I do once a year for 10-12 days, LOL! Here is an article to get you started: *How To Get Well: Curing The Incurables With "The Milk Cure"* http://nutrition-and-physical-regeneration.com/blog/1959/how-to/how-to-get-well-curing-the-incurables-with-the-milk-cure/

8544465753d56e89bd1bb2c92e9cea7a

on August 23, 2011
at 06:53 PM

No idea about the protocol. I want to lose weight and if there are any specific details... do tell..

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 23, 2011
at 05:34 PM

Which protocol are you following?

8544465753d56e89bd1bb2c92e9cea7a

on August 23, 2011
at 08:08 AM

Sure its too early to tell and I'm not complaining. I just felt that my temperature went up a bit and I felt sweaty. Anyways im going to do it for a week or two and see the results. Thanks...

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 22, 2011
at 07:05 PM

Ha Daniyal, nothing is "normal" on the Milk Diet since it is essentially a nutrient dense "fast" - i.e. you get the benefits of fasting w/o the fast aggressive reactions (normally) that can happen on a typical. So during this stage "anything" can happen. What is your body temp? And what was it before? And do you normally have an issue with milk? How much milk are you drinking and for how long? Was it one day or two days?

8544465753d56e89bd1bb2c92e9cea7a

on August 22, 2011
at 02:29 AM

I spent a day or 2 drinking just raw milk and my body temperature has gone high... Is this normal??

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 19, 2011
at 10:05 PM

Hunger per se doesn't come into play. It is not a diet in the normal sense. It is a therapeutic feeding protocol that is designed only for a short period of time.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 19, 2011
at 10:02 PM

It depends on what your purpose is, but the general therapeutic protocol is from 6-10 quarts a day, depending on who you are reading.

8544465753d56e89bd1bb2c92e9cea7a

on August 19, 2011
at 09:34 PM

How much milk do you consume on milk diet?

B14dc4aa1ddefbec3bc09550428ee493

(3909)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:51 PM

So you're telling me they are forcing themselves to take in milk beyond what they are hungry for then? Yeah, you probably could take in a lot of carbs if you are ignoring hunger and forcing yourself to consume a set amount. If you are listening to your hunger signals though your consumption would taper off over time. Well, assuming you are drinking whole milk and not the watered down stuff.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 19, 2011
at 04:38 AM

Then you aren't doing the milk diet. :p And I have known plenty of small people who managed to get that amount of milk down, which is tough for everyone regardless of size. Dr. Crewe recommends up to 10 quarts a day! But the point remains that for people who do the milk diet as a therapeutic protocol in the recommended amounts it is not low carb and therefore weightloss cannot be attributed to lowered carbohydrate intake.

B14dc4aa1ddefbec3bc09550428ee493

(3909)

on August 18, 2011
at 02:45 AM

A person of my size could never drink that much milk. For me, it's definitely low carb and I'm 50 lbs. overweight. It may not be low carb for a larger person, but it definitely would be for many people.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 17, 2011
at 06:49 PM

The historic use of the Milk Diet has included (but not exclusively) skimming the cream, with good results. I prefer the use of whole milk ala Dr. Crewe of Mayo Clinic fame.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 17, 2011
at 06:46 PM

6 quarts of cows milk contains 270 grams of carbohydrates in the form of "milk sugar," i.e. lactose. For sheeps milk it is 318 grams. For goats milk it 258 grams. Hardly low carb.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 17, 2011
at 06:45 PM

6 quarts of milk cows milk contains 270 grams of carbohydrates in the form of "milk sugar," i.e. lactose. For sheeps milk it is 318 grams. Hardly low carb. For goats milk it 258 grams.

Fff58a1fd1e29d93fd6a25d3fdebbade

(400)

on August 17, 2011
at 01:56 AM

OK how about half milk and half cream :)

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on August 16, 2011
at 09:14 PM

Henny - you mean heavy cream by itself? as a one food "diet"? I really don't think so. Although cream contains tiny amounts of carbs/protein, it's heavily skewed toward fat for caloric density. I think cream could keep someone alive for quite a while if that's all they had, but whole milk would probably keep someone much healtier overall than just the cream fat.

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7 Answers

7
37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

on August 16, 2011
at 02:28 AM

That study where the participants consumed a bland, repetitive liquid diet where all the lean people maintained their weight but the overweight and obese lost... If it were down to food reward, wouldn't the same results be seen if someone were to consume only milk? If you don't see the same results, wouldn't that say something about milk?

That's exactly the results you see on a milk diet. I have never known anyone to gain weight on the Milk Diet, even when forcing themselves to drink the large amounts of milk called for in some therapeutic versions of the Milk Cure unless they were underweight to begin with.

I have done the Milk Diet on several occasions and always got leaner, i.e. lost fat but retained muscle. I'm not sure of body composition in the study you reference but that is precisely one of the advantages of the milk diet is there is no loss of lean tissue while on it.

The diet does get old after awhile except on one occasion I had a extremely good supplier who had very tasty milk (i.e. more nutritious from cows raised on better soil) and I could have stayed with that for a longer time. But in terms of palatability it will be less palatable relative to any solid food diet precisely because its liquid and not solid food despite all the lactose. Same goes for a juice fast despite all the fructose.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 19, 2011
at 10:02 PM

It depends on what your purpose is, but the general therapeutic protocol is from 6-10 quarts a day, depending on who you are reading.

8544465753d56e89bd1bb2c92e9cea7a

on August 19, 2011
at 09:34 PM

How much milk do you consume on milk diet?

8544465753d56e89bd1bb2c92e9cea7a

on August 23, 2011
at 08:08 AM

Sure its too early to tell and I'm not complaining. I just felt that my temperature went up a bit and I felt sweaty. Anyways im going to do it for a week or two and see the results. Thanks...

8544465753d56e89bd1bb2c92e9cea7a

on August 22, 2011
at 02:29 AM

I spent a day or 2 drinking just raw milk and my body temperature has gone high... Is this normal??

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 23, 2011
at 05:34 PM

Which protocol are you following?

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 22, 2011
at 07:05 PM

Ha Daniyal, nothing is "normal" on the Milk Diet since it is essentially a nutrient dense "fast" - i.e. you get the benefits of fasting w/o the fast aggressive reactions (normally) that can happen on a typical. So during this stage "anything" can happen. What is your body temp? And what was it before? And do you normally have an issue with milk? How much milk are you drinking and for how long? Was it one day or two days?

8544465753d56e89bd1bb2c92e9cea7a

on August 23, 2011
at 06:53 PM

No idea about the protocol. I want to lose weight and if there are any specific details... do tell..

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 24, 2011
at 06:49 PM

Ah yes, for "beautification" purposes, something I do once a year for 10-12 days, LOL! Here is an article to get you started: *How To Get Well: Curing The Incurables With "The Milk Cure"* http://nutrition-and-physical-regeneration.com/blog/1959/how-to/how-to-get-well-curing-the-incurables-with-the-milk-cure/

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 24, 2011
at 06:50 PM

And feel free to contact me via email if you any questions/issues/problems.

3
E639bc85fd42430285596434a6515ad5

(2226)

on August 16, 2011
at 03:04 AM

Sally Fallon mentioned in an interview that whenever she needs to lose 10 pounds, she goes on a diet consisting exclusively of (raw) milk for a week or so.

1
Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on August 16, 2011
at 04:04 AM

I tolerate dairy just fine, so if I had to chose one single thing to eat for a week and all I could have is that one item plus water only, I would choose organic grass fed whole raw milk. I consider it a complete food more than a liquid drink. Actually I have seriously considered doing this and still may. Talk about an elimination diet!

0
Cc69a51b427eaad36251cce9dcca4d3a

(1074)

on November 25, 2011
at 09:23 PM

homogenized milk is not Paleo. dairy is also anabolic and favors weight gain (check any mainstream weightlifting dogma and they use whole milk to put ON MASS, NOT LOSE WEIGHT)

0
F1b39d4f620876330312f4925bd51900

(4090)

on August 16, 2011
at 03:11 PM

On this blog a contributor detailed her milk diet journey. http://www.thehealthyhomeeconomist.com/2011/03/the-milk-cure-in-action-days-1-3/ Do a search for 'milk cure' on this blog and you can read about the rest of her days on the diet as well.

0
B14dc4aa1ddefbec3bc09550428ee493

on August 16, 2011
at 06:00 AM

If you do the math you'll quickly see that an all milk diet is fairly low in carbs. That's where the weight loss comes from.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 17, 2011
at 06:45 PM

6 quarts of milk cows milk contains 270 grams of carbohydrates in the form of "milk sugar," i.e. lactose. For sheeps milk it is 318 grams. Hardly low carb. For goats milk it 258 grams.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 17, 2011
at 06:46 PM

6 quarts of cows milk contains 270 grams of carbohydrates in the form of "milk sugar," i.e. lactose. For sheeps milk it is 318 grams. For goats milk it 258 grams. Hardly low carb.

B14dc4aa1ddefbec3bc09550428ee493

(3909)

on August 18, 2011
at 02:45 AM

A person of my size could never drink that much milk. For me, it's definitely low carb and I'm 50 lbs. overweight. It may not be low carb for a larger person, but it definitely would be for many people.

B14dc4aa1ddefbec3bc09550428ee493

(3909)

on August 19, 2011
at 06:51 PM

So you're telling me they are forcing themselves to take in milk beyond what they are hungry for then? Yeah, you probably could take in a lot of carbs if you are ignoring hunger and forcing yourself to consume a set amount. If you are listening to your hunger signals though your consumption would taper off over time. Well, assuming you are drinking whole milk and not the watered down stuff.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 19, 2011
at 10:05 PM

Hunger per se doesn't come into play. It is not a diet in the normal sense. It is a therapeutic feeding protocol that is designed only for a short period of time.

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 19, 2011
at 04:38 AM

Then you aren't doing the milk diet. :p And I have known plenty of small people who managed to get that amount of milk down, which is tough for everyone regardless of size. Dr. Crewe recommends up to 10 quarts a day! But the point remains that for people who do the milk diet as a therapeutic protocol in the recommended amounts it is not low carb and therefore weightloss cannot be attributed to lowered carbohydrate intake.

0
Fff58a1fd1e29d93fd6a25d3fdebbade

(400)

on August 16, 2011
at 05:59 AM

Wouldn't Heavy Cream be preferable to milk?

Af1d286f0fd5c3949f59b4edf4d892f5

(18472)

on August 16, 2011
at 09:14 PM

Henny - you mean heavy cream by itself? as a one food "diet"? I really don't think so. Although cream contains tiny amounts of carbs/protein, it's heavily skewed toward fat for caloric density. I think cream could keep someone alive for quite a while if that's all they had, but whole milk would probably keep someone much healtier overall than just the cream fat.

Fff58a1fd1e29d93fd6a25d3fdebbade

(400)

on August 17, 2011
at 01:56 AM

OK how about half milk and half cream :)

37f4b3c51afbd92d259afaa171270874

(1219)

on August 17, 2011
at 06:49 PM

The historic use of the Milk Diet has included (but not exclusively) skimming the cream, with good results. I prefer the use of whole milk ala Dr. Crewe of Mayo Clinic fame.

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