2

votes

Could stored lipid toxins prevent fat loss?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 14, 2012 at 9:43 PM

Fat stores energy, creates leptin and somehow stores toxins. Could the toxins in body fat prevent fat loss as a measure of protecting the body? Also would you need to remove those toxins if this is the case?

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on July 17, 2012
at 04:33 PM

I think they might of covered this in the book Toxic Fat. Its been awhile since I read it. But if your physically remove the fat containing it, it harms you. The fat moves into a different location and most time that fills up again. So its probably due to something that is being eaten that is toxic.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on July 17, 2012
at 06:05 AM

Sorry about the visual. I am actually on the verge of posing a new question based on this one, or maybe it is part of this conversation. "Is adipose tissue a protective "organ" to preserve the organism when faced with toxins in excess of what can be eliminated safely?"

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:15 AM

Adiponectin and leptin are both released by adipose tissue. Adiponectin is involved with fatty acid metabolism, but it's effects on weight loss/gain directly are less clear than leptin. Also, I don't really know what PCB is in, but it seems to be a residual pollutant from various industries and winds up in the soil and other places.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on July 15, 2012
at 03:55 PM

Looking forward to this more detailed stuff. I thought it was leptin not adiponectin. Also what is PCB in?

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on July 15, 2012
at 03:54 PM

Shitstorm gives me an awful visual.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on July 14, 2012
at 10:23 PM

So perhaps a one, two punch of reduced permeability mixed with increased toxic load. I would add, reduced liver function, and the ability to actually remove the toxins from the HFCS often consumed alonside the other two. So basically a shitstorm of badness if we live/work in a polluted environment and hit up a fast food place on the way home.

C45d7e96acd83d3a6f58193dbc140e86

on July 14, 2012
at 10:10 PM

Your body does take up transfats quite effectively and use them in cellular structure, causing them to be less pliable. It also affects cellular permeability.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on July 14, 2012
at 09:46 PM

The thought has certainly crossed my mind, but the typical answer is to do those redonculous cleanses, so I'm not sure how one might go about "fixing" it other than providing enough non-toxic fat slowly over time as a replacement.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on July 14, 2012
at 09:46 PM

Feel free to correct any statements that may be false. My understanding of biology isn't the greatest, yet.

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1 Answers

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A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 14, 2012
at 11:09 PM

I think this idea is really interesting and it makes sense to me. I went looking for evidence:

This study involved baby rats, so obviously it's not the best one to look at but it had interesting findings. Two groups of rats were formed, one group was exposed to PCB (which is a toxin with a strong affinity for storage in fat tissue) and the effects on leptin and thyroid hormone were measured:

"Leptin concentrations were significantly depressed in 15-day-old animals exposed to PCB when compared to same-aged control animals". "We speculate that the accumulation of fat-soluble PCB in adipocytes may be sufficient to cause these alterations".

This study examined the correlation between apparent PCB exposure and adiponectin levels in obese women. Adiponectin is secreted mainly by fat tissue which has been clearly shown to benefit insulin sensitivity and possibly obesity. This was observational, so no causation can be determined, but the researchers reported the following:

Plasma levels of total adiponectin...significantly negatively correlated with plasma levels of PCB 153 in OB (OB=obese women). "Our results may suggest suppression of adiponectin by PCB 153 in obese women under non-energy-restrictive regime".

Perhaps unsurprisingly, PCB exposure has been linked to diabetes.

This study, utilizing mice and in vitro trials, concluded the following:

"Our findings suggest that PCB-77 may contribute to the development of obesity and obesity-associated atherosclerosis"

Finally this study found a correlation between PCB exposure and waist circumference.

So PCB's, which are stored in fat tissue, seem to promote weight gain, though I'm aware these studies aren't slam dunk evidence. But they're interesting.

Moving to organochlorines, another toxin which is stored in fat; this review paper had some really interesting things to say, including this:

"Most of us have been exposed to organochlorines found in pesticides, dyes, solvents, etc., and we contain residues in our adipose tissue, where they are preferentially stored. Thus, the obese tend to have increased organochlorine concentrations compared to lean individuals [229]...organochlorine concentration has been correlated with decreases in triidothyronine (T3) concentration and resting metabolic rate [230]. This is also associated with a reduction in activity of the skeletal muscle oxidative enzymes that normally are involved in fat oxidation [231]".

The paper explains that organochlorines are stored in fat and during weight loss are released into the blood where they exert negative effects on metabolism.

This study followed 90 people for 20 years, measuring their markers of health and apparent exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POP's), finding a correlation between exposure to POP's (including certain organochlorines and PCB's with 7 or more chlorines) and future BMI. They also discussed (but did not conclude) possible mechanisms:

"Chemicals may cause obesity by altering homeostatic metabolic set-points, disrupting appetite controls, perturbing lipid homeostasis to promote adipocyte hypertrophy, or stimulating adipogenic pathways that enhance adipocyte hyperplasia during development or in adults[16],[17]"

Bisphenol-A is a fairly well known chemical found in canned food and the like and has an affinity for storage in fat. This study reported the following:

"BPA at environmentally relevant doses inhibits the release of a key adipokine that protects humans from metabolic syndrome. The mechanism by which BPA suppresses adiponectin and the receptors involved remains to be determined"

In mouse studies, BPA exposure may cause or increase diabetes and obesity. Bpa may also increase the inflammatory adipokines interleukin-6 and Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha, which evidence is beginning to casually link to insulin resistance, as well as other negative health effects.

Well, I didn't get to the synthetic estrogens, but I think this makes a clear case that fat stored toxic chemicals can hinder weight loss. Some evidence suggests their release into the blood during weight loss is largely what causes this and that being stored in fat is actually protective, but results are mixed. It's all hard to say, but either way such compounds are worth being aware of. More research into how to avoid and deal with such chemical exposure and fat storage will likely be good for aiding in weight loss efforts.

C4f1a0c70c4e0dea507c2e346c036bbd

on July 15, 2012
at 03:55 PM

Looking forward to this more detailed stuff. I thought it was leptin not adiponectin. Also what is PCB in?

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 16, 2012
at 06:15 AM

Adiponectin and leptin are both released by adipose tissue. Adiponectin is involved with fatty acid metabolism, but it's effects on weight loss/gain directly are less clear than leptin. Also, I don't really know what PCB is in, but it seems to be a residual pollutant from various industries and winds up in the soil and other places.

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