9

votes

Can you help me (help myself) beat my eating disorder(s)?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created May 06, 2012 at 7:01 PM

Hi guys - I'm hoping for some advice on how to really work on myself. I just graduated college and I have about two months of doing NOTHING before my job starts, and I want to use this time to tackle some of the food demons that I've dealt with for a decade or so. I'm also trying to lose 20-30 pounds. This will probably be long, but I appreciate anyone who can offer advice or support!

First, some background: 22, female, 5'3, about 150 pounds. Happy weight is about 125. Been paleo for about 8 months. History of chronic undereating/undiagnosed anorexia/EDNOS (age 12-18) and binge eating disorder (age 18-present). I've been in and out of therapy throughout all of this, but only recently (the past year or so) have I really been determined to get rid of this eating disorder and improve my relationship with food. I'm currently not in therapy, because I don't want to get a therapist until I move for my job (consistency is important to me when it comes to therapists) so I'm trying to do some recovery on my own until then.

What I've been doing - all of which I consider PROGRESS:

  • Eating 3 square meals/day - bfast, lunch, dinner. No snacking. Each meal has at least a serving of fat (usually 2), a serving of protein, and a ton of vegetables (mostly cruciferous - cooked). An example is my favorite breakfaste: 1 cup red cabbage, 1 cup kale cooked in 1-2 TBSP coconut oil, 1/2 avocado, and sardines/wild salmon with sea salt. Mmmm.
  • Stopped running 5-6x/week - started walking, doing yoga, LHT, and sprinting. I was a cardio JUNKIE and ran 6-10 miles at a time. Now, I do full body strength training 2x/week, yoga 4-5x/week (or more - I'm loving it right now), walking 1-2 hours 2-3x/week, and sprinting 1-2x/week.
  • Being more active in general. I'm "anti-sitting" right now - I rarely watch TV and would rather do stuff around the house if I'm bored (clean, organize, etc.). I also give myself at least one activity to do everyday which typically becomes my afternoon activity to keep me busy (random errands, studying for the GMAT, etc.).
  • Upped my calories from 1000-1200 to 1300-1700 /day, added fat, added meat. For years I've been eating a starvation diet of chicken/turkey/egg whites and green vegetables only. I've now included lots of coconut oil, kerrygold butter, and grass-fed beef... and I'm loving it.
  • Sleeping 8-9 hours per night. This is glorious. Thank you, empty schedule.
  • Stopped weighing myself and started using a measuring tape. Breaking up with the scale was really difficult, but I'm glad I did it. However, I'm struggling a bit with using measuring tape to measure my progress. How often should I measure? From what I understand, inches go down at a slow pace, and I don't want to get frustrated by lack of progress (and consequently binge, even though it makes no sense when I do that). Measure once a week? Once a month?
  • Journal everyday and work through the Beck Diet Solution. I'm REALLY trying to tackle the mental side of my diet - I know that it's the only way I'm going to have a healthy relationship with food. I truly believe that Paleo is the best diet for me, but I know that any diet alone is not enough to cure me of my eating disorder(s) - I really have to understand why I turn to food (in good times and bad) and develop better coping mechanisms. This, however, is a frustratingly slow process.

Where I'm not having too much progress:

  • I'm still binging. My last one was 6 days ago, which was the end of a 4 day binge that spanned the weekend. Gluten and sugar - the usual.
  • Because of my binges, I am 20-30 pounds over a healthy weight (for me). I am technically overweight (it stings as I write that) and want desperately to be healthier, thinner, and more fit.
  • Because I am overweight, I have terrible body image and I don't want to leave my house until I'm thinner. This is unhealthy, unrealistic, and overall a terrible idea. But how do you go out and see people when you feel terrible about how you look?

I know many questions have been asked related to binging and eating disorders... and I've read through all of them. I feel like I'm in the middle of being deep into binge eating disorder/anorexia and being recovered, and I'm really looking for any advice that may just get me over the hump to "smooth sailing" toward recovery. In other words, I feel like I have many of the tools I need to conquer this, but I haven't yet had that lightbulb moment when everything clicks and I can go about my daily life without constantly having to WORK at not binging or thinking about food all the time. Does that moment of clarity even exist? I really want to take this time before I start work to work on myself and really work through these issues that have plagued me for the past 10 years. If you read through all of this, I sincerely thank you - any help related to weight loss, recovery, or anti-binging is much appreciated.

As always, grok on.

A3c56c85290f748410a6f340ddd552b3

(321)

on November 04, 2012
at 03:50 PM

Thank you for this question and I wish you the best.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on June 08, 2012
at 05:22 PM

"Talk to that sweet, nurturing part of yourself that wants to soothe you with food, and gently explain to her that you'd like to try some other methods." What a warm, gentle, and beautiful suggestion. So simple, yet so profound. I'm going to try this next time I need something to help me walk away from foods I know will only lead to disaster.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 08, 2012
at 01:12 PM

+1 me too. Recovery is a long road but it sounds like you are well on your way.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 08, 2012
at 01:00 PM

I would be very wary of this. Sugar is addictive, with or without fat.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 08, 2012
at 12:57 PM

As someone who has also been there, I would upvote this a million times too. Great answer.

31381cfeb5d6da6fc75f80ab68e041ea

(560)

on June 08, 2012
at 09:10 AM

+1 love this advice and your gentle heart

31381cfeb5d6da6fc75f80ab68e041ea

(560)

on June 08, 2012
at 09:09 AM

+1 love this advice and your gentle heart

31381cfeb5d6da6fc75f80ab68e041ea

(560)

on June 08, 2012
at 09:04 AM

i know i'm late to the party, but wearing cute clothes helps me immensely. wearing somehting that's lovely AND fits and is comfortable helps me remember i am worthy of life RIGHT NOW, no matter what my body looks like.i don't have to put life on hold.

4fce8590b5453d379dddeaa649955eb9

(173)

on May 07, 2012
at 07:36 PM

You're welcome, binging really gives a horrible sense of defeat that no one deserves. You could also try watching movies, read books or game during the times of the day where you'd suspect a possible binge. This has worked for me on occassion.

56f585aeed92954cf45b94d3f5b3df98

(146)

on May 07, 2012
at 09:24 AM

Please tell me what you think! I was amazed that sugar actually helped me STOP craving food.

Bbd349fe334481d99c091333b87cacb5

(346)

on May 07, 2012
at 01:50 AM

Good luck to you! My thoughts are with you.

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 07, 2012
at 12:38 AM

More great ideas. And, for what it's worth, that last sentence made me tear up. That's going to be my #1 affirmation that I, right now, will promise to say to myself everyday. Thank you.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on May 06, 2012
at 11:28 PM

Yes, you can also make a "comfort kit" or a "relapse prevention kit". Do any close friends and family members know about your issue? If so, ask each of them to write a letter to you about all the ways you are lovely. Put these in your comfort kit! Acknowledging your worth, how much you are loved...helps you realize that you capable of living a life free of an ED when you feel like you're too weak to overcome your ED. Other comfort kit ideas are the "delay ideas" in an envelope, pictures of you when you were happy, reminders of accomplishments that you are proud of. You are worth recovery.

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:56 PM

Honestly, you're right about this. Everyone has something to be self-conscious about. Thank you for the tough love!

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:52 PM

Wow, lots of really great stuff here. I welcome the sloppiness and personal stories very much! I really need to get into positive affirmations and just get into the habit of saying nice things to myself. It's simple but so effective. Thanks for sharing your story, foreveryoung - it seems like you are in a much better place now and I applaud you for getting there and continuing to fight the fight.

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:50 PM

This is a great idea. I've been meaning to get into meditation but have instead focused on to-do lists and other activities to keep my mind busy. Also, you reminded me that it's not so much about my relationship with food, but my relationship with myself. Thank you.

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:49 PM

Thank you for your thoughts! That envelope idea is genius and I've already starting making mine. It's a different - but much better - kind of goodie bag. You're also right about the measuring tape. I know when I'm gaining or losing weight - I don't need the numbers to prove it. Thanks again, Sunny Beaches.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:11 PM

Foods that I ate a lot of when recovering: ground beef stew (potatoes, carrots, celery, onion, broccoli, beef), fish stock (gross to make but soul soothing), yogurt (aside from the casein, it's all good), oranges (no logic I just ate a lot of em), and roasted root vegetables (beets, sweet potatoes, vidalia onions)

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:10 PM

Foods that helped my recovery but that I don't eat much of anymore (aside from the beef)- ground beef stew (potatoes, carrots, celery, onion, broccoli, beef), fish stock (gross to make but soul soothing), yogurt (aside from the casein, it's all good), oranges (no logic I just ate a lot of em), and roasted root vegetables (beets, sweet potatoes, vidalia onions)

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 06, 2012
at 09:53 PM

...Paleo is great as a foundation, and do probably try your best to eat paleo at home. But do allow yourself to live and don't get down on yourself for eating obviously non-paleo foods. I eat out all the time and frequent sushi, sorbet for treat, buttery French Bistro food, etc and feel zero remorse. My fridge is paleo and I'm content with tha

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 06, 2012
at 09:52 PM

...Paleo is great as a foundation, and do probably try your best to eat paleo at home. But do allow yourself to live and don't get down on yourself for eating obviously non-paleo foods. I eat out all the time and frequent sushi, sorbet for treat, buttery French food, etc and feel zero remorse. My fridge is paleo and I'm content with that.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 06, 2012
at 09:44 PM

you'll have build some needed confidence in yourself.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 06, 2012
at 09:44 PM

Also, I have mixed feelings about the fear of going out in public because of such low self esteem. MY friends and siblings were scared of me when I was sick, and I don't blame them. When I look back on pictures my heart my heart still jumps to my throat at first glance. So, going to school and going anywhere in public was a nightmare for me too because of all the looks I would get. IT feels like their stares are burning holes right through you. What I say is perhaps make it 21 days without relapse right now, and then gradually start venturing out more and more often, b/c by then...

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on May 06, 2012
at 09:26 PM

Your questions really hit home for me. I've been terrified of "falling off the wagon," but don't think I'd admitted it to myself yet. I've been a binge eater for 30+ years and am doing my best to fix the damage I did.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on May 06, 2012
at 09:23 PM

I wish I could up-vote your answer a million times. Thank you for sharing. I definitely needed to hear it!

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on May 06, 2012
at 08:21 PM

I definitely can't argue with that. Hopefully others can provide some tips/guidance that will work better for you. Good luck!

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 08:20 PM

Knowing that it's possible is one of the only things that's keeping me going. Thanks for that reminder (also that this will take time) and for your comment.

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 08:19 PM

Will check this out - thanks!

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 08:18 PM

Thanks for the micronutrient reminder and EFT recommendation!

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 07:51 PM

These are all really wonderful tips - especially #2. Thank you very much for commenting and encouraging me to keep going on this difficult journey.

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 07:42 PM

Thanks for your comment, Mike. I pretty much could have written your first paragraph because I know that "binge rationalization/justification" so well. I have tried fasting in the past to remedy a binge, but I'm hesitant to rely on long fasts because of my anorexic past. I don't want to punish myself by starving myself, if that makes sense. I want to stop viewing food as reward and starvation as punishment - I want it to just be FOOD.

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 07:39 PM

Paleo has helped me for sure, but you're right in that I need to know and understand my triggers. My struggle there is that I know when I feel triggered, but it's hard for me to identify them. Usually it's boredom, stress, and filling a social void (example: when I'm home alone instead of out with friends). Also, I avoid fruit and nuts (nuts = major binge trigger), but I occasionally eat unsweetened chocolate - 1 square, pre-portioned. Unsweetened chocolate doesn't trigger binges, but 90% or lower usually does. Thanks for your comment.

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 07:36 PM

Love your blogs!!!!! Your journey has been an inspiration to me for many months. Thanks very much for commenting!

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17 Answers

best answer

12
0d50f54d2c57d74806be35d916f8dc74

(634)

on May 06, 2012
at 07:45 PM

You are doing some great things to help heal your relationship with food. As someone who dealt with anorexia and bulimia as a teen, and with binge eating most of my life, I'll share what's helped for me:

1) I focus on health rather than weight loss. I'd suggest losing the tape measure as well as the scale. You know when your clothes are tighter or looser without stirring up the mental crap that comes with numbers.

2) I don't beat myself up when I have a binge. Realize that whatever you do, it's in an attempt to nurture yourself, however misguided the action may be. Notice what's going on before/during a binge. Ask yourself if there's anything else you can do to nurture yourself - a hug, a walk, a pedicure. If no, ride it out while paying as much attention as you can to what's happening.

3) I know there are certain things I will binge on if they're in the house. I've stopped telling myself that I'm strong enough to be moderate with them now. There will inevitably be a moment of weakness. I won't keep any form of sugar in the house, because that's a disaster waiting to happen.

4) I end up on shaky ground if I start tracking my foods - I end up becoming obsessive. I do much better if I keep healthy/non-binge foods in the house, and spend my mental energy on other things - creative endeavors or whatever.

I think you're on the right track with the journaling and getting plenty of sleep. Just please be gentle in how you deal with yourself. Talk to that sweet, nurturing part of yourself that wants to soothe you with food, and gently explain to her that you'd like to try some other methods. (That come's from a very helpful book I read a while back, but cannot recall the title of.) I know that part of the binge problem can by physiological - with sugar addictions and all. But a large part is mental/emotional, and it does no good to try to bulldoze your way through that part.

61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on May 06, 2012
at 09:23 PM

I wish I could up-vote your answer a million times. Thank you for sharing. I definitely needed to hear it!

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 07:51 PM

These are all really wonderful tips - especially #2. Thank you very much for commenting and encouraging me to keep going on this difficult journey.

Fd70d71f4f8195c3a098eda4fc817d4f

(8014)

on June 08, 2012
at 05:22 PM

"Talk to that sweet, nurturing part of yourself that wants to soothe you with food, and gently explain to her that you'd like to try some other methods." What a warm, gentle, and beautiful suggestion. So simple, yet so profound. I'm going to try this next time I need something to help me walk away from foods I know will only lead to disaster.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 08, 2012
at 12:57 PM

As someone who has also been there, I would upvote this a million times too. Great answer.

6
78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

on May 06, 2012
at 08:50 PM

- I'm still binging.

I find that "an ounce of prevention is worth a pound in cure" is relevant here. The only way I can tackle the binge monster is to try and prevent it in the first place. I keep an envelope of "things to do instead of binging". When I'm feeling lonely, bored, or sad (meaning the itch to binge is coming) I reach into the envelope and force myself to do that activity for half an hour. Usually, this helps take my mind off of binging. Things on my list are: play violin, go for a walk, take a warm shower, color, write a letter to a friend, call my sister, dance to music, etc. Keeping an emergency list helps me when I feel weak and vulnerable...having something pre-prepared makes it easier during a mentally tough time.

What helps me is to start an activity that requires effort for a period of time. I'll start painting, because I know that I can't let paint sit out or it will dry. So it will distract me for at least half an hour.

- Because of my binges, I am 20-30
pounds over a healthy weight (for
me).

Be patient with yourself and realize that it's not just about weight/numbers. You said yourself that this is a mental battle. Your improvements won't always show on your body. Take note of those accomplishments, too. Be kind to yourself and understand that mental health is necessary to get the ball rolling. If necessary, get rid of the measuring tape and just go by how you feel in your clothes. You are more than a sum of numbers and if you stay focused on your weight and measurements, efforts to lose weight may be thwarted by feelings of failure and inadequacy...setting up the self-defeating cycle.

- Because I am overweight, I have terrible body image and I don't want to leave my house until I'm thinner.

This is a tough one. Very, very tough. You know what? Don't put off buying that special dress, makeup or purse (or fill in the blank) "until you lose weight" as a prize. Dress to feel confident about yourself. Get your nails done. Get a new haircut. You can be full of life and beauty at any weight and you deserve to feel good about yourself. Just because you are overweight doesn't mean that you are any less deserving of experiencing the beautiful things life has to offer. If you dress it and fake it til you make it, it might give you the confidence boost to meet your goals. Dressing well also helps you get into that mindset that you need to take care of yourself and give you motivation to continue doing so.

Other suggestions:

  • Try a support group like OA.Having a sponsor to call when you need one (and with someone who understands) might be helpful.
  • Are you eating alone? If so, find a way to eat with people. It's easier to control your eating and to eat mindfully when you are social and talking. It makes eating a less stressful experience and being social is good in other ways too.

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:49 PM

Thank you for your thoughts! That envelope idea is genius and I've already starting making mine. It's a different - but much better - kind of goodie bag. You're also right about the measuring tape. I know when I'm gaining or losing weight - I don't need the numbers to prove it. Thanks again, Sunny Beaches.

78cb3c4f70de5db2adb52b6b9671894b

(5519)

on May 06, 2012
at 11:28 PM

Yes, you can also make a "comfort kit" or a "relapse prevention kit". Do any close friends and family members know about your issue? If so, ask each of them to write a letter to you about all the ways you are lovely. Put these in your comfort kit! Acknowledging your worth, how much you are loved...helps you realize that you capable of living a life free of an ED when you feel like you're too weak to overcome your ED. Other comfort kit ideas are the "delay ideas" in an envelope, pictures of you when you were happy, reminders of accomplishments that you are proud of. You are worth recovery.

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 07, 2012
at 12:38 AM

More great ideas. And, for what it's worth, that last sentence made me tear up. That's going to be my #1 affirmation that I, right now, will promise to say to myself everyday. Thank you.

31381cfeb5d6da6fc75f80ab68e041ea

(560)

on June 08, 2012
at 09:04 AM

i know i'm late to the party, but wearing cute clothes helps me immensely. wearing somehting that's lovely AND fits and is comfortable helps me remember i am worthy of life RIGHT NOW, no matter what my body looks like.i don't have to put life on hold.

5
C90eecdd76cf57a387095fa49de23807

(960)

on May 06, 2012
at 07:28 PM

Hi guys. I'm writing this to self-plug, but just to let you know about what I do. I write two blogs on women and paleo nutrition, with a special focus on eating disorders. I come from a background of disordered eating myself, as well as being a trained eating disorder advisor for many years, and a functional diagnostic nutritionist. I openly welcome women and men to email me to talk about their problems and how I might help them. Please feel free to shoot me a line from either one of my blogs: www.paleopepper.com (where most of my eating disorder stuff is archived) www.paleoforwomen.com (where I put more of my scientific and neurobiological research)

Best of luck, guys. It really is possible, and I do believe in you. I did it, and so, so many women I've talked to have done it.

Stefani

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 07:36 PM

Love your blogs!!!!! Your journey has been an inspiration to me for many months. Thanks very much for commenting!

4
1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

on May 06, 2012
at 09:32 PM

Hi, Paleoette. Do not lose hope. It looks like you are doing many of the right things, but I'm going to relay a few things that I believe are critical to overcoming your eating disorder. I'll try to make it quick, but it's going to be dirty. The first thing I would suggest is to get yourself an active, personal (people you see face to face) support group. This is so critical as it keeps you accountable. The second is positive affirmations, which includes writing and memorizing 3 of them, and then reciting 2-3 upon waking, before bed, and before meals. It sounds selfish, but for someone experiencing the cripplingly low self esteem and personal doubt that accompanies an eating disorder, it is one the best things you can do. Don't sweat the small small stuff, take baby steps, and accept that you can never be perfect and no one on the planet is- appearances can be deceiving. Set daily goals and stick to them. Set new ones frequently but keep in mind and adhere to the old ones (if still relevant) as well.

You need to give it enough time without relapse to build positive momentum. This will build your confidence and ability to trust yourself, which is critical for long-term success. As far as I know, the 21 day rule works pretty well for establishing new habits, so give it at least 21 days without obvious eating disorder behaviors- severe caloric restriction, or bingeing/purging.

I won't sugar coat it and tell you that a light switches on and you have zero compulsion to slip back into bad habits. However, I will tell you that once you make the decision to get better, the will to overcome defeats that compulsion. At first you have to consciously fight it- every moment of every second of every day. But with dogged determination, what was once active fighting will become passive and unconscious, and the desire to regress back to old habits will be fleeting. Please don't give up- everything can get better if you want enough and take action.

If you're wondering what my "credentials" are, I'll give them to you. I was extremely anorexic, underweight, and malnourished from the ages of 12-15, and have been totally recovered at a healthy weight for the past 7 and a half years. I am literally over 100lbs heavier now than I was when I was 15, I'm also taller too and I was told that I would not surpass 5'6" because of my prolonged and severe anorexia at a critical stage in life (I'm now 160 and 5'10"). Those were absolutely the most dismal and desperate days (years, actually) of my life. It is exhausting to live like that both physically and emotionally, but don't be foolish and think that it can never get worse. No matter how bad off you currently are or have been in the past, it can always get worse (trust me). It is up to you to prevent this from happening. I do believe that if it doesn't kill, it will only make you stronger.

Best of luck.

P.S. Sorry for the sloppiness of this. I am writing quickly and trying to condense a lot of thoughts and personal experience into something short enough to still be readable.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:10 PM

Foods that helped my recovery but that I don't eat much of anymore (aside from the beef)- ground beef stew (potatoes, carrots, celery, onion, broccoli, beef), fish stock (gross to make but soul soothing), yogurt (aside from the casein, it's all good), oranges (no logic I just ate a lot of em), and roasted root vegetables (beets, sweet potatoes, vidalia onions)

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:52 PM

Wow, lots of really great stuff here. I welcome the sloppiness and personal stories very much! I really need to get into positive affirmations and just get into the habit of saying nice things to myself. It's simple but so effective. Thanks for sharing your story, foreveryoung - it seems like you are in a much better place now and I applaud you for getting there and continuing to fight the fight.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:11 PM

Foods that I ate a lot of when recovering: ground beef stew (potatoes, carrots, celery, onion, broccoli, beef), fish stock (gross to make but soul soothing), yogurt (aside from the casein, it's all good), oranges (no logic I just ate a lot of em), and roasted root vegetables (beets, sweet potatoes, vidalia onions)

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 06, 2012
at 09:52 PM

...Paleo is great as a foundation, and do probably try your best to eat paleo at home. But do allow yourself to live and don't get down on yourself for eating obviously non-paleo foods. I eat out all the time and frequent sushi, sorbet for treat, buttery French food, etc and feel zero remorse. My fridge is paleo and I'm content with that.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 06, 2012
at 09:44 PM

you'll have build some needed confidence in yourself.

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 06, 2012
at 09:53 PM

...Paleo is great as a foundation, and do probably try your best to eat paleo at home. But do allow yourself to live and don't get down on yourself for eating obviously non-paleo foods. I eat out all the time and frequent sushi, sorbet for treat, buttery French Bistro food, etc and feel zero remorse. My fridge is paleo and I'm content with tha

1edb06ded9ccf098a4517ca4a7a34ebc

(14952)

on May 06, 2012
at 09:44 PM

Also, I have mixed feelings about the fear of going out in public because of such low self esteem. MY friends and siblings were scared of me when I was sick, and I don't blame them. When I look back on pictures my heart my heart still jumps to my throat at first glance. So, going to school and going anywhere in public was a nightmare for me too because of all the looks I would get. IT feels like their stares are burning holes right through you. What I say is perhaps make it 21 days without relapse right now, and then gradually start venturing out more and more often, b/c by then...

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 08, 2012
at 01:12 PM

+1 me too. Recovery is a long road but it sounds like you are well on your way.

31381cfeb5d6da6fc75f80ab68e041ea

(560)

on June 08, 2012
at 09:10 AM

+1 love this advice and your gentle heart

4
96bf58d8c6bd492dc5b8ae46203fe247

(37227)

on May 06, 2012
at 07:48 PM

A year ago, I would have said I had no answer since my binge career covered 40+ years.

Now, however, I can't make promises but I can tell you I found a solution for myself.

  • It took 5-7 months
  • It started with a 3-month stint of starting my days with large meals of fatty meat, either with or followed by low-starch vegetables and low-density fruit (using willpower but the meat helped)
  • In month 4, I binged twice but got back on the meat, vegetables and fruit wagon
  • In month 5, I began drinking water kefir and it healed my gut. Within a month I noticed that drinking a fizzy bottle in the afternoon seemed to turn off my cravings for junk
  • Beginning in month 6, I found I could choose to splurge on a neo-food and there was no binge

In the 6 months since the last step above, I have splurged and safely returned to my "formula" of meat, vegetables and fruits many times. I no longer have digestive upsets from my splurges, nor do I lose control and have massive binges as I used to. What happens is that the neo-treats taste amazingly good at first but there is vague disappointment when they hit my gut and within a day or 2 I am happily back to my unprocessed foods. I even have neo-stuff in the fridge and cupboards that my grandson bought and it doesn't bother me.

I hope you're able to find your way to a solution that works for you; at least I can tell you it's possible.

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 08:20 PM

Knowing that it's possible is one of the only things that's keeping me going. Thanks for that reminder (also that this will take time) and for your comment.

3
Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 08, 2012
at 01:27 PM

There are a lot of really great answers here. I only have one thing to add, and that's to cultivate patience. You're doing yoga, which is great. One of the things I like about yoga (at least with my teacher) is we talk about your inner fire - the flame of your life force. As you breathe through your yoga exercises, try to visualize this life spirit within you. As you heal, your body and your spirit will ever so gradually come together until you will realize that you are your body, you are your spirit, it is one and the same, and you can finally inhabit your body fully. When you walk, you can meditate, like in yoga, breathing deeply. I would concentrate on these - walking and yoga - rather than on honing your body through sprints and weights exercise at this point.

I know all this might sound hokey, but I have been where you are - in a place where I rejected my own body and just wanted it to be something other than it was - and RIGHT NOW. Running compulsively, binging, restricting, the whole nine yeards. It is devastating. I could hardly tolerate being in my body a minute longer, I hated it so much. It is possible to recover, I have. I never thought it would be possible for me to look in a mirror and actually like my body, but I can and do. As someone else said, we are all different and we are all imperfect. What we need to be able to do is embrace our uniqueness and inhabit our bodies here and now, not in some more perfect future.

THere was one exercise I did that was very powerful and helped at one point - go into the bathroom and look into your eyes. Deeply. For a long time. There you are. You are worthy of love. You are incredible. It is your life, your spirit, your body. You can bring them together. It won't happen in two months, three, even six maybe, but everything you are doing is helping. Be patient with yourself.

3
56f585aeed92954cf45b94d3f5b3df98

on May 06, 2012
at 07:50 PM

Danny Roddy's advice derived from Ray Peat's research about sugar has really helped solv my binge eating disorder. Sugar without the fat actually made me feel A LOT better. It may help to check them out.

dannyroddy.com

raypeat.com

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 08:19 PM

Will check this out - thanks!

56f585aeed92954cf45b94d3f5b3df98

(146)

on May 07, 2012
at 09:24 AM

Please tell me what you think! I was amazed that sugar actually helped me STOP craving food.

Bf57bcbdc19d4f1728599053acd020ab

(5043)

on June 08, 2012
at 01:00 PM

I would be very wary of this. Sugar is addictive, with or without fat.

3
Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on May 06, 2012
at 07:20 PM

I too have the binging problem. Once I fall off the wagon, I convince myself I need to take advantage of the situation and eat everything possible that I normally wouldn't allow myself. This even continues past the point where I know I am full and have a stomach ache.

One thing that helps me with at least ending the binge and perhaps delaying a relapse is to set a firm time when the binge will end (hopefully not too far in the future) and then fast for 24-36 hours to provide a clean break. Here is more detail:

http://paleohacks.com/questions/115756/in-the-middle-of-a-binge-how-to-stop/115870#115870

Ae8946707ddebf0f0bfbcfc63276d823

(9402)

on May 06, 2012
at 08:21 PM

I definitely can't argue with that. Hopefully others can provide some tips/guidance that will work better for you. Good luck!

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 07:42 PM

Thanks for your comment, Mike. I pretty much could have written your first paragraph because I know that "binge rationalization/justification" so well. I have tried fasting in the past to remedy a binge, but I'm hesitant to rely on long fasts because of my anorexic past. I don't want to punish myself by starving myself, if that makes sense. I want to stop viewing food as reward and starvation as punishment - I want it to just be FOOD.

2
3327924660b1e2f8f8fc4ca27fedf2b2

(2919)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:31 PM

Because I am overweight, I have terrible body image and I don't want to leave my house until I'm thinner. This is unhealthy, unrealistic, and overall a terrible idea. But how do you go out and see people when you feel terrible about how you look?feel terrible about how you look?

This might sound mean and like I'm criticizing you (not my intention, pinky swear) but you just have to "get over it."

I had severe acne for most of my adolescent life.

People in 2012 society view acne as more of a problem than being slightly overweight. Unless you're morbidly obese, nobody is going to point and stare.

But even if you have mild or moderate acne, MOST people stare and a few will also point or comment on it (which made my self-confidence plummet to 0.) That's why I think you just need to get over it.

Long story short, after some deep thought and consideration, I decided I like myself - acne (plus 4 other major health problems) or not! First step is to love yourself unconditionally.

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:56 PM

Honestly, you're right about this. Everyone has something to be self-conscious about. Thank you for the tough love!

31381cfeb5d6da6fc75f80ab68e041ea

(560)

on June 08, 2012
at 09:09 AM

+1 love this advice and your gentle heart

2
F524eaa9d58e5cd2d2368ff7bfffda9c

(480)

on May 06, 2012
at 09:19 PM

Well done, it sounds like you have the right attitude and mindset to lead a healthier life.

All I can add is that you may find it beneficial to learn some form of mindfulness meditation. Vippassana is a very simple but very effective method to heal your relationship with yourself and your environment.

In the Paleo world we love cold hard science, so here is a snipit of science to backup meditation http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rCxo9GwbP_8

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 10:50 PM

This is a great idea. I've been meaning to get into meditation but have instead focused on to-do lists and other activities to keep my mind busy. Also, you reminded me that it's not so much about my relationship with food, but my relationship with myself. Thank you.

2
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32564)

on May 06, 2012
at 07:51 PM

Great progress!

Dial in the micronutrients. Add in: Organ meats, bone broth, gelatin.

Get your D tested & sun or supplement to 50-60 ng/ml.

Many folks are deficient in Magnesium, zinc, selenium.

Make sure you are getting sufficient A & K2.

Measure hips & waist once a month.

Try some EFT for the binging/cravings/image issues. Works wonderfully!

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 08:18 PM

Thanks for the micronutrient reminder and EFT recommendation!

2
4fce8590b5453d379dddeaa649955eb9

on May 06, 2012
at 07:21 PM

I feel with you. I really do. When i was 13 i slowly developed an eating disorder too and i have until just a few months ago (im now 18 years of age) been on a starvation diet. A year ago i started having trouble with binge eating too, but this has only given some 4-5 pounds of surplus weight luckily.

Its tough to say what'll work for you to conquer it really. Given that i'm not through it yet. The paleo diet has helped part of the way imo. I'd advise you to think about what triggers you: Is it boredom? then find something to do, take a walk (this is hard i know, even as i say this i think of instances where i SHOULD have but didn't do this) is it when you feel bad? It is also important to be in a socially happy enviorment. If you live in a place you don't like or hang out with people who doesn't 'fulfill' you, this could actually be contributing to your binge eating. It could act as a way of filling a social void. But above all i'd say: Don't try to compensate too much for your binges. Focus on attaining a normal relationship with food. Imo its a good idea to cut out fruits, 'snacks' like dark chocolate and nuts etc as they are easier to binge on than real food. And hey - you're already a long way. Admitting that your eating is disordered, and your fed up with it and want to have a normal relationship with food is a huge step. One i first took half a year ago.

A115b8aa3c375f10d5bde0c0d06b6143

(865)

on May 06, 2012
at 07:39 PM

Paleo has helped me for sure, but you're right in that I need to know and understand my triggers. My struggle there is that I know when I feel triggered, but it's hard for me to identify them. Usually it's boredom, stress, and filling a social void (example: when I'm home alone instead of out with friends). Also, I avoid fruit and nuts (nuts = major binge trigger), but I occasionally eat unsweetened chocolate - 1 square, pre-portioned. Unsweetened chocolate doesn't trigger binges, but 90% or lower usually does. Thanks for your comment.

4fce8590b5453d379dddeaa649955eb9

(173)

on May 07, 2012
at 07:36 PM

You're welcome, binging really gives a horrible sense of defeat that no one deserves. You could also try watching movies, read books or game during the times of the day where you'd suspect a possible binge. This has worked for me on occassion.

0
A3c56c85290f748410a6f340ddd552b3

on November 04, 2012
at 03:53 PM

Julia Ross' book The Diet Cure is my go-to for attempting to nip a binge or excess snacking or just "I don't like myself" behaviors when they start. Good luck and be well!

0
0d7be15fd1a76c7a713b0e2e75381e75

(307)

on September 20, 2012
at 03:05 AM

Hey girl, I know this is a late answer but I am battling the same battle. What has helped me on my way to getting over 9 years of eating disorders and some of the most ridiculous binge-eating you can imagine (think 18oz of chuck roast, whole watermelons, bags of apples, blocks of cheese, jars of honey...in the same sitting) was the ebook "Brain Over Binge." There is a website associated with this as well where you can learn a lot about the author's concepts. No affiliation whatsoever, it just helped me open my mind to the real reasons behind BED, and how to really stop. I know everyone is different and it may not help you but I know how eating disorders can ruin your life, so to speak and if I help one person it would make me happy. I am also a 22 year old female, and all I wish is that someone had given me that book earlier so I could have saved precious years of my life. (You're supposed to binge drink your way through college not binge-eat, sheesh). Let me know if this helps at all, or how you are doing since this post.

0
193f00d53ebcb13940c7a55afc78ad17

on June 08, 2012
at 01:03 PM

Make some pizzas, sandwiches, tacos, gyros using my 'pork bread' recipe (found here: paleohacks.com/questions/122385/what-do-you-think-update-on-pork-bread-usage-with-recipe).

If you can over eat on that you are a better person than I. The 'bread', which is high in protein/fat and has zero carbs, is super filling, and easy to make. I'll make a 8-10" pizza and be STUFFED after eating half. Sticks with you too.

0
31381cfeb5d6da6fc75f80ab68e041ea

(560)

on June 08, 2012
at 09:09 AM

+1 love this advice and your gentle heart

-1
44f0901d5b0e85d8b00315c892d00f8a

on June 08, 2012
at 02:56 PM

The following is a list of some beliefs that clients with various eating disorders have identified and eliminated. Can you see that anyone with beliefs such as these probably would have an eating disorder? Can you see that if someone didn't have any of these beliefs and, instead, held their opposite, such as "I'm okay just the way I am, I don't have to do anything or be any particular way to be accepted," it would be highly unlikely she would have an eating disorder?

Say each of the following beliefs out loud. If any of them resonate with you, it's probably a belief you hold. Even though you may have held it since you were a child, and even if you've tried a number of ways to get rid of it, the Decision Maker?? Process can assist you to eliminate it permanently.

I have to be perfect or people won't accept me.
The way to be in control is to throw up.
The way to get rid of feelings is to throw up.
Throwing up is the only thing that is totally mine.
The ability to eat and not gain weight makes me special.
In order to be worthwhile I have to be thin.
I'm not good enough.
I'm not deserving.
I'm powerless; I'm not in control of my life.
I'm inadequate.
I'm not important
I'm not lovable.
I have no value.
I don't deserve to take up space.
There's something wrong with me.

http://goo.gl/xGsTB

Answer Question


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