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Training to failure: sudden anxiety and need to rest??

Commented on February 11, 2014
Created February 10, 2014 at 10:33 AM

Once a week I do strength training, consisting of two exercises with a 5/5 cadence to failure. For example, yesterday I did an incline chest press and a leg press on high weight with a 5/5 cadence to failure.

For the last month or so, I've been noticing that a few hours after training I start to feel bad. Yesterdya my body felt numb, I felt a bit disoriented and a bit panicky, and I had an sudden need to rest. This is the fourth time this is happened. This is contrary to before that period, when such a workout session would be energising. I have no idea why this is happening and Im wondering if you have any clues why it would.

A2301f8606e5416d56bdfbb6d3e13132

on February 11, 2014
at 09:59 PM

It sounds like it's okay. The concern with the sports wouldn't be with heart rate, but in fatiguing your highest order fast-twitch muscles further before they are recovered. Considering it's just recreational I wouldn't be too worried about it.

Everyone here has limited information about your life, so it's going to be hard to pinpoint the cause here. You do have a few other things you can try, and a deload week would be an example of something you could try to see if overtraining is in fact an issue.

Reading your OP again, my personal guess would lean towards post-workout nutrition

D8644ecc819aa7fb98ed93eece4befa2

(281)

on February 11, 2014
at 08:58 PM

Ok, sounds great. I'm using Tim Ferriss' Occams Protocol, which is pretty similar. I actually take 14 days between the same exercises. Week A is pulldown / shoulder press, week B is chest press and leg press. But I practice recreational sports most of the days between workouts, which might bump up my heart rate a lot. What do you think of this schedule? I feel comfortable with it, only after the to failure workout I feel very bad.

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 11, 2014
at 02:11 AM

@daz, I never go to failure -- not because I necessarily think its bad -- I just hate lifting with a partner. Lifting to failure would be a big problem for me.

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on February 10, 2014
at 10:08 PM

good advice. some would even go further and say that you never need to train to failure (or is that 'true failure' if they are different)

D8644ecc819aa7fb98ed93eece4befa2

(281)

on February 10, 2014
at 08:25 PM

Thank you for your rely. How much carbs eat you on normal days and who much on inge days?

C39808bffe1667f19f3bd9a2c663e727

(0)

on February 10, 2014
at 08:03 PM

Maarten from my person experience too long low carb disturb thyroid function. It's happens step by step. So to keep hormones balanced i do 1 HUGE carb day once a week.

D8644ecc819aa7fb98ed93eece4befa2

(281)

on February 10, 2014
at 07:59 PM

That's exactly what I do already. After workout I consume a PhD meal - 200g meat, fats and veggies, and a "safe starch" such as white rice. Blood sugar doesn't seem likely. I like the idea of cortisol fluctuations though - but why would this be a problem for the last month, and not before? I've become less stress and more relaxed, if any. Wouldn't that imply a greater resilience to cortisol spikes?

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4 Answers

0
5b9a25a1a676397a25579dfad59e1d7b

(2318)

on February 11, 2014
at 09:21 PM

Agree with CDone. Listen to your body, relax and take some time to recover.

0
A2301f8606e5416d56bdfbb6d3e13132

on February 11, 2014
at 05:45 PM

So I'm assuming that you're doing this from the Body by Science protocol, which is cool, but I think he could have explained better.

Your muscles take a MINIMUM of 7 days to recover after going to failure, there have been many studies that have shown this, usually takes around 10 days for most people, with some on either side of that. This isn't necessarily the issue, but is one potential thing to address.

D8644ecc819aa7fb98ed93eece4befa2

(281)

on February 11, 2014
at 08:58 PM

Ok, sounds great. I'm using Tim Ferriss' Occams Protocol, which is pretty similar. I actually take 14 days between the same exercises. Week A is pulldown / shoulder press, week B is chest press and leg press. But I practice recreational sports most of the days between workouts, which might bump up my heart rate a lot. What do you think of this schedule? I feel comfortable with it, only after the to failure workout I feel very bad.

0
C39808bffe1667f19f3bd9a2c663e727

on February 10, 2014
at 04:31 PM

Most likely low blood sugar + high cortisol from high intensity training.

I used to get same before adding some starch post workout. It helps a lot.

Also seems like some of the carbs destabilize blood sugar, worst for me was oatmeal. When i was having oatmeal BEFORE training, it was making me close to pass out after - and i needed to eat smng asap or i couldn't function, never had this from rice, or wheat for example.

So though it's paleo forum, i would recommend to up carbs(starchy - like rice) on training days - and consume them RIGHT AFTER you finish working out...

C39808bffe1667f19f3bd9a2c663e727

(0)

on February 10, 2014
at 08:03 PM

Maarten from my person experience too long low carb disturb thyroid function. It's happens step by step. So to keep hormones balanced i do 1 HUGE carb day once a week.

D8644ecc819aa7fb98ed93eece4befa2

(281)

on February 10, 2014
at 07:59 PM

That's exactly what I do already. After workout I consume a PhD meal - 200g meat, fats and veggies, and a "safe starch" such as white rice. Blood sugar doesn't seem likely. I like the idea of cortisol fluctuations though - but why would this be a problem for the last month, and not before? I've become less stress and more relaxed, if any. Wouldn't that imply a greater resilience to cortisol spikes?

0
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 10, 2014
at 04:14 PM

These are classical symptoms of over-training. You cannot go to failure every time.

Try throwing in a deload week. Many experienced weight trainers swear by a 3/1 deload scheduled -- 3 weeks on, one week off. It is important to note that a deload week is not sitting on the coach drinking beer. A deload week is about low impact, higher range of motion exercises (i.e. slow paced pushups/pullups rather than bench/lat pull down). This allows your body to recover from the intense exercises you have been preforming.

My personal schedule is a 1/2/1 where I do 1 week high reps (3 sets of 8-10 reps), low weight. 2 weeks high weight, low reps (3x5 followed by 5x5), and a deload week typically of plyometrics (I use the P90x ply workout three times in that week). I also do virtually no cardio in my deload week and I throw in 3 yoga classes (I do no yoga in the other three weeks, but will do some dynamic stretching every day).

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on February 10, 2014
at 10:08 PM

good advice. some would even go further and say that you never need to train to failure (or is that 'true failure' if they are different)

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