1

votes

How often do you clean your water bottle?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 15, 2012 at 7:24 PM

If you drink water from a reusable bottle (whether it be glass, stainless, or BPA-free plastic), how often do you wash it, how, and why?

I personally use a BPA-free plastic bottle, but I'm a slouch when it comes to cleaning it, because I figure that it essentially gets rinsed several times a day normally, and the germs within are all mine anyway. I normally leave it in the fridge overnight. Do you think this is a potentially unhealthy practice?

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on October 19, 2012
at 07:10 PM

Well, the bite valve apparatus is kinda broken so I pull the whole thing off and separate the two parts. I remove the straw from the cap and stick everything in the dishwasher. Eh, I'm thinking of getting a Smart Shake just for convenience when I go to the gym. Prolly will be easier to clean.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on October 16, 2012
at 03:34 PM

Lots of germs are bad for you...it's not like most of use have little whey pouches in our mouths to produce happy little backwashes...

Baa413654789b57f3579474ca7fa43d7

(2349)

on October 16, 2012
at 12:40 PM

"chemicals having [estrogenic activity] EA can leach from plastic products at very low (e.g., nanomolar to picomolar) concentrations that individually or in combination can produce adverse effects, especially in fetal to juvenile mammals. This leaching of monomers and additives from a plastic item into its contents is often accelerated if the product is exposed to common-use stresses such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation in sunlight..." http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3222987/

Baa413654789b57f3579474ca7fa43d7

(2349)

on October 16, 2012
at 12:39 PM

Might not be a good idea if your bottle is still full of water.

Baa413654789b57f3579474ca7fa43d7

(2349)

on October 16, 2012
at 12:36 PM

"Almost all commercially available plastic products we sampled—independent of the type of resin, product, or retail source—leached chemicals having reliably detectable [Estrogenic Activity] EA, including those advertised as BPA free. In some cases, BPA-free products released chemicals having more EA than did BPA-containing products." http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3222987/

F694fc245d03b64d6936ddb29f4c9306

(2613)

on October 16, 2012
at 12:25 PM

Do you have a source for the plasticizer concern? I've never heard of that before. I've got a bunch of BPA-free plastic bottles (e.g. Blender Bottles). Is that enough reason to replace them all with Klean Kanteens?

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on October 16, 2012
at 09:11 AM

You make it sound like those germs are bad for you.

F694fc245d03b64d6936ddb29f4c9306

(2613)

on October 16, 2012
at 12:08 AM

Same here, I mostly wash the outside. I have the Contigo ones with the push-valve, which is really hard to rinse out if you use soap.

F694fc245d03b64d6936ddb29f4c9306

(2613)

on October 16, 2012
at 12:07 AM

Interesting idea with the now-useless grains! Thanks!

Medium avatar

(3213)

on October 15, 2012
at 09:27 PM

I mostly wash mine on the outside

Medium avatar

(3213)

on October 15, 2012
at 09:25 PM

How do you clean your Camelback?

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on October 15, 2012
at 08:35 PM

Yeah, I'm beginning to rethink that after reading some of these, haha....I only wash mine if I've had lemon or ginger or something in it...

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11 Answers

best answer

3
71bd25c5d978d8b008d9c56967f7cac1

(290)

on October 15, 2012
at 07:42 PM

I don't think is necessarily unhealthy, there's germs everywhere, so no need to obsessively clean it. As a standard practice I clean mine out once a week with regular dish soap and warm water. One benefit to being grain free is that I have a lot of dry grains left over (rice, lentils, bulgur wheat, etc) that now have a purpose.

To clean my water bottle I use ~ 1cup warm water (depending on the size of the vessel), a dash of dish soap, and 1/2 cup or so of your grain of choice (currently I'm cleaning my way through a bucket of lentils from 2011). When it's all in there the lentils will actually scour the inside with the soapy water and get it nice and clean. Just shake it around for 30-60 seconds, rinse thoroughly and voila - clean water for another week!

Cheers.

F694fc245d03b64d6936ddb29f4c9306

(2613)

on October 16, 2012
at 12:07 AM

Interesting idea with the now-useless grains! Thanks!

3
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on October 15, 2012
at 08:08 PM

I wash it after each day of use. Mine usually gets used while eating when we are out and about, so the potential for backwash means there are likely germs other than mine in there.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on October 16, 2012
at 03:34 PM

Lots of germs are bad for you...it's not like most of use have little whey pouches in our mouths to produce happy little backwashes...

9f54852ea376e8e416356f547611e052

(2957)

on October 16, 2012
at 09:11 AM

You make it sound like those germs are bad for you.

2
29de39321d0c82b4f9b64d787aac5404

(40)

on October 16, 2012
at 02:12 PM

When my daughter was in college she had a cold she just couldn't kick. After several weeks of up and down symptoms, she finally looked inside her water bottle. It was pretty disgusting. She never thought to clean it, she always rinsed it before filling, etc. Once she cleaned it thoroughly, her symptoms went away. Yes, all this could be mostly from just being in college, but it's made us both make sure to clean our bottles regularly. I got a bottle brush, works great. I recently took apart one bottle that has intricate parts and found mold, so I now know to fully breakdown these occasionally, too.

2
Baa413654789b57f3579474ca7fa43d7

(2349)

on October 15, 2012
at 08:29 PM

http://greenliving.nationalgeographic.com/reusing-water-bottles-increase-bacterial-content-3019.html

This article is about the one time use plastic bottles, but I think the same issues apply.

"In 2003 the University of Calgary conducted a study of 75 plastic water bottles from an elementary school classroom. The bacteria levels were so high in the bottles that, had the water been from the tap, a boil-water order would have been issued (see References 2). However, the study concluded that the high bacteria levels were more associated with poor hygiene practices than with the plastic bottles themselves. Bacteria grow naturally in moist, warm environments, and virtually any container can provide the right circumstances for bacterial growth."

So yes, the germs may all start out as "yours" but given time, they will grow and multiply. I rinse mine out every morning with some warm water and soap.

1
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on October 16, 2012
at 11:39 AM

Um, some of those BPA free bottles have plasticizers that are worse than BPA itself! I either re-use an S. Pellegrino bottle if nothing else is available, or use a stainless steel bottle.

I wash it out every day, but that's because I tend to carry bulletproof coffee in it. :)

F694fc245d03b64d6936ddb29f4c9306

(2613)

on October 16, 2012
at 12:25 PM

Do you have a source for the plasticizer concern? I've never heard of that before. I've got a bunch of BPA-free plastic bottles (e.g. Blender Bottles). Is that enough reason to replace them all with Klean Kanteens?

Baa413654789b57f3579474ca7fa43d7

(2349)

on October 16, 2012
at 12:36 PM

"Almost all commercially available plastic products we sampled—independent of the type of resin, product, or retail source—leached chemicals having reliably detectable [Estrogenic Activity] EA, including those advertised as BPA free. In some cases, BPA-free products released chemicals having more EA than did BPA-containing products." http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3222987/

1
59fa7cd87fb9d669adf21e5cf3e7ada5

on October 15, 2012
at 08:01 PM

I have never cleaned a water bottle in my life.

518bce04b12cd77741237e1f61075194

(11577)

on October 15, 2012
at 08:35 PM

Yeah, I'm beginning to rethink that after reading some of these, haha....I only wash mine if I've had lemon or ginger or something in it...

F694fc245d03b64d6936ddb29f4c9306

(2613)

on October 16, 2012
at 12:08 AM

Same here, I mostly wash the outside. I have the Contigo ones with the push-valve, which is really hard to rinse out if you use soap.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on October 15, 2012
at 09:27 PM

I mostly wash mine on the outside

1
61844af1187e745e09bb394cbd28cf23

(11058)

on October 15, 2012
at 07:43 PM

If I leave it in the fridge, I don't worry about washing it. If I've left it out, I wash it. I'm still a germaphobe, so I probably wash things more frequently than others.

0
21edc8c230265de4ac60378df347f59d

on August 31, 2013
at 05:09 AM

Plastic water bottles give me pains in my ab. I use glass and was looking for an answer to clean it also. I am allergic to soap as well so have been using vinegar. Any tips?

0
319cdfcd8ec0467f34a3c5aeb2a5e045

on October 16, 2012
at 07:03 AM

About 1-2 a week when I spot it in my bicycle basket as I'm already watching dishes. More if it falls off the back.

If you use one of those narrow bottle tops, pipe cleaners help.

0
Medium avatar

(3213)

on October 15, 2012
at 09:24 PM

Place your bottle under direct sunlight for at least 15 minutes, the UV from the sunlight will kill all potentially harmful bacteria. But I don't think you'll ever get sick from bacteria in your water bottle, if you have a healthy gut flora.

Baa413654789b57f3579474ca7fa43d7

(2349)

on October 16, 2012
at 12:39 PM

Might not be a good idea if your bottle is still full of water.

Baa413654789b57f3579474ca7fa43d7

(2349)

on October 16, 2012
at 12:40 PM

"chemicals having [estrogenic activity] EA can leach from plastic products at very low (e.g., nanomolar to picomolar) concentrations that individually or in combination can produce adverse effects, especially in fetal to juvenile mammals. This leaching of monomers and additives from a plastic item into its contents is often accelerated if the product is exposed to common-use stresses such as ultraviolet (UV) radiation in sunlight..." http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3222987/

0
782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

on October 15, 2012
at 08:23 PM

I put my bottle (Camelback) in the dishwasher at least twice a week. I rinse it out before filling it with water everyday but for some reason I still find mold on occasion (yuk!). So I take it all apart to make sure it gets well cleaned. Don't want to take a chance getting sick and sometimes you just can't see what's growing in your bottle.

Medium avatar

(3213)

on October 15, 2012
at 09:25 PM

How do you clean your Camelback?

782d92f4127823bdfb2ddfcbcf961d0e

(5231)

on October 19, 2012
at 07:10 PM

Well, the bite valve apparatus is kinda broken so I pull the whole thing off and separate the two parts. I remove the straw from the cap and stick everything in the dishwasher. Eh, I'm thinking of getting a Smart Shake just for convenience when I go to the gym. Prolly will be easier to clean.

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