2

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Dehydration, water and the Cult of Kruse ?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created July 07, 2013 at 7:12 PM

While searching for hydration information, I came across a posting by Jack Kruse:

http://www.jackkruse.com/quantum-biology-4-coherent-water/

He states that:

"Coherent water is a different animal altogether. It is water that is structured to be supremely cooperative in a living biologic system. It allows water to have local interactions with other molecules of water or something else so that the local interactions can have global effects, and this coherence means it is also bidirectional. That means the global effects can effect local interactions. Coherent water is best thought of as the whole of its actions being much greater than the sum of its molecular parts. This is how life uses water."

"Bulk liquid water is therefore a two-fluid system consisting of a coherent phase. Close to 40 percent of total volume of water at room temperature is actually capable of being coherent. The remainder 60% is present as an incoherent phase of water. "

"In the coherent phase, the water molecules oscillate between two electronic configurations in phase with a resonating EMF. "

"PHYSIC GEEKS: Roger A. Klein (QED chemist) at Bonn University has found evidence (2006) of coherence from electronic and quantum chemical computations in the formations of six and five membered rings of ice. He also found that there is a greater stabilizing energy and much higher electron density at critical bond points for each hydrogen bond in the 5 and 6 membered rings compared to the single hydrogen bond between two liquid water molecules called dimers. The greater bond strength comes from hydrogen bond shortening within the clustered rings compared to the liquid forms. This is another property of water that really should have caught the attention of the biochemical world because it shows how water can act coherently from sub atomic level to the macroscopic level on Earth in nature. It showed chemistry that cooperativity is more due to the increased tetrahedron bonds in water more than cluster sizing alone. This was no accident of nature. The hexagonal motif of ice and liquid crystalline water and the edge fused pentagonal motif in gas clathrates occur because of QED interactions. We now have firm evidence that these large clusters of water exist in liquid water under ordinary conditions on Earth as well. This implies that liquid water is fully capable of becoming a liquid crystal and enables coherent energy transfer to take place in cells."

Because I'm having a hard time drinking this Kool Aide, I'm not sure if there's any merit to some of his suggestions like drinking SPRING WATER, and that these forms of magnesium being superior:

Magnesium threonate: gets to brain & spinal cord //// morning during lighted hours

Magnesium Malate: gets to skeletal muscles and cardiac muscles

Magnesium orotate (big one) key for ATP synthesis, (from cardiovascular surgery literature)

So, with all that said, is there any chance that the root cause of my muscle cramps, tension headaches, occasional foot/ankle/hand swelling, apparent hydration and electrolyte balance problems are related to WiFi, EMF, me drinking fluoridated water, and that I don't walk around outside in bare feet "grounding" myself?

Thanks for any thoughts or comments,

Mike

PS: I just discovered that the water filter on my fridge, as well as my GE water filter by my sink do NOT filter out fluoride.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

+! for a great answer!

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on July 08, 2013
at 12:28 AM

+1 for a great answer!

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on July 07, 2013
at 11:06 PM

Wow, cool pubmed link. I suddenly want an earthing mat.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on July 07, 2013
at 07:29 PM

I'm reminded of Masaru Emoto.. very new-agey stuff. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_JaO-kXIAnQ (Step 1: Write kind words on bottled water. Step 2: ... Step 3: profit.)

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on July 07, 2013
at 07:13 PM

BTW, I should add that my friends think I'm in the "cult of caveman", so I probably shouldn't be soo judgmental re: "cult of kruse"

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2 Answers

4
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on July 07, 2013
at 09:50 PM

One particular element of this excerpt caught me: "The hexagonal motif of ice and liquid crystalline water and the edge fused pentagonal motif in gas clathrates occur because of QED interactions. We now have firm evidence that these large clusters of water exist in liquid water under ordinary conditions on Earth as well"

The idea that most frozen water is usually hexagonal is certainly well accepted. For liquid water, not so much. I generally try not to cite wikpedia, but I think their article on "hexagonal water" is a fair synopsis of the evidence against this theory Kruse is pushing, particularly this quote:

"The concept of hexagonal water clashes with several established scientific ideas. Although water clusters have been observed experimentally they have a very short lifetime: the hydrogen bonds are continually breaking and reforming at timescales shorter than 200 femtoseconds.[5] This contradicts the hexagonal water model's claim that the particular structure of water consumed is the same structure used by the body"

Given this, I don't believe any merit should be given to ideas based on this premise. However, I'm not to sure this says anything of things like fluoridated water or grounding.

There have been some actual trials on grounding in the Journal of Alternative and Complementary medicine, supposedly showing beneficial effects, including improved sleep and cortisol patterns (link). There are a number of reasons to critique these study's validity, but they're enough to make me take notice and not rush to judgment.

Similarly, I think there's some (albeit weak) evidence to suggest fluoridated water might have negative effects on health. There's certainly a lot of research on the subject, though a lot of it is poorly controlled epidemiology and high dose animal studies. Still, I'm keeping my ear to the ground on fluoride. I suspect it probably carries some risk.

Sometimes weird people promote ideas that seem weird, but maybe what they're saying is actually legit, even if they don't work the way the weird people say they do. I kinda doubt Kruse's recommendations would be that helpful, but it if walking around barefoot is pretty easy why not give it a try? Experiment! See what happens.

Cf08ad26759fdd206a2c9f9385080a57

(995)

on July 07, 2013
at 11:06 PM

Wow, cool pubmed link. I suddenly want an earthing mat.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on September 07, 2013
at 01:28 AM

+! for a great answer!

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on July 08, 2013
at 12:28 AM

+1 for a great answer!

4
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on July 07, 2013
at 08:30 PM

This psuedo-scientific tripe is why Kruse should not ever be taken seriously.

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