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Specifics of glucogenesis?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 16, 2011 at 1:45 AM

I've read about glucogenesis- the conversion of amino acids into glucose- but does anyone have specifics about how it works, or might effect a ZC or VLC diet? Is there a way to know how much of your dietary protein is converted into glucose? If I binge on steak, is it the same as eating a potato? Does it have any dependance on hormones or fasting blood sugar levels? Do tell!

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on June 17, 2011
at 12:07 AM

It does depend upon hormone status and energy utilization. It most commonly is used during sleep in people without metabolic derangements such as sleep apnea or hepatic Leptin resistance.

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4 Answers

2
8dcaccd731863adaf88b5f645d601935

on June 16, 2011
at 04:05 AM

Gluconeogenesis can utilise lactate and amino acids (alanine) produced in the muscles as a result of glycolysis via Cori cycle. So GNG works every time you lift weights to produce more glucose for muscles to use and store as glycogen. Dietary amino acids can enter GNG as well as glycerol component of fatty acids. Structural amino acids are used if the amino acid pool isnot replenished from the diet. That's why there is no line in the sand where you start breaking down muscle. Think of it this way: your muscles are in a constant state of remodeling. Breakdown into amino acids and building up into proteins happens all the time. Hopefully you are receiving enough dietary amino acids which add into the total pool of amino acids. It is the NET amount that counts. Yes GNG will always happen. But so will glycolysis. Once GNG has produced enough glucose to keep your brain happy it is inhibited by that blood glucose level. You can supplement the energy requirements of the brain and heart by ketones, thus reducing their reliance on glucose alone.

1
100fd85230060e754fc13394eee6d6f1

(18706)

on June 16, 2011
at 11:38 PM

If your body is working properly, you will not convert protein to glucose beyond what is needed for immediate use. So, no, a steak binge will not result in an overload of glucose.

1
4bf5827bfb7df85c5b4b485db0945e64

(1386)

on June 16, 2011
at 02:52 AM

Glucogenesis involves glucogenic amino acids and the glycerol backbone of triglycerides. If you are ZC or VLC, you are definitely doing a lot of gluconeogenesis since the brain absolutely requires glucose. I will add that I've heard a lot of commentary on the amount of brain energy requiring glucose to be 25% so your body's ability to generate glucose via gluconeogenesis suffices. Other physiological changes occur as well such as reducing muscle glycogen stores and switching to storing some fat in muscle for energy.

As far as how much protein is converted from dietary sources, there isn't a one-size-fits-all answer. The entire system is dependent on various factors such as substrates, hormones, etc. As long as you're eating enough protein, which on a LC or VLC diet most eat more than enough, you won't muscle waste.

Eating steak is not going to be the same as eating a potato.

It does depend on hormones and blood sugar levels. One hormone intimately involved here is cortisol. Insulin/glucagon also have rolls in terms of maintaining blood sugar and delivering substrates into cells.

0
Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on June 17, 2011
at 12:05 AM

The creation of glucose from non carbohydrate sources is called gluconeogenesis. The primary fuel sources for GN in humans are glycerol, Lactate, pyruvate, and alanine.

Ed71ab1c75c6a9bd217a599db0a3e117

(25482)

on June 17, 2011
at 12:07 AM

It does depend upon hormone status and energy utilization. It most commonly is used during sleep in people without metabolic derangements such as sleep apnea or hepatic Leptin resistance.

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