1

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Trader Joe's vitamins?

Answered on September 16, 2016
Created July 26, 2011 at 3:21 PM

I am interested in taking a multi-vitamin, and wonder what you all think of TJ's brand of vitamins? They claim to be fairly (mostly?) pure, without a lot of fillers, but that still leaves it wide open in terms of quality.

The price is certainly attractive, which of course also makes it suspect. ;-)

Thanks, Diane

5cbd326041fead0c1ec71fbd106ef083

on January 20, 2012
at 10:32 PM

Thank you! I appreciate the time & input. In reading more since this original post (July), I've decided to do what you suggest in the last paragraph, and pick and choose those supplements I feel I'm lacking. So far, I'm taking fish oil and magnesium, but I'm considering Vit D during the winter months.

5cbd326041fead0c1ec71fbd106ef083

on July 28, 2011
at 02:00 PM

Aravind, I do eat real foods from good sources. But I've read about soil depletion and most paleo books do recommend supplements of some sort, so I was curious about brand quality.

D1c02d4fc5125a670cf419dbb3e18ba7

on July 27, 2011
at 01:59 AM

Why do you feel you need to supplement with a multivitamin? Absent a known deficiency, just eat real foods from good sources.

5cbd326041fead0c1ec71fbd106ef083

on July 26, 2011
at 09:42 PM

Hmm, that's interesting! I would have assumed Costco brand to be full of fillers and undesirable additives. Thanks!

B96486cc39cf24fdf259424f833a5d5b

(493)

on July 26, 2011
at 03:48 PM

We don't have a TJ here, but my husband did some research on the best multivitamins and Kirkland brand (from COSTCO) came out on top in all things.

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2 Answers

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Ebb10603524dd22621c1155dd7ddf106

(19150)

on January 17, 2012
at 08:49 PM

As has been mentioned, if you are eating well, sticking to paleo (even 80/20), you probably don't need a general multivitamin. However ...

Here's my general rule for choosing a multivitamin: capsule > tablet; from food > not from food; multi-dose > single-dose.

Capsules are much better than tablets. Any hope you have of getting any requisite bio-cofactors for vitamins and minerals gets obliterated when a tablet is pressed. Tablets may or may not already be cooked, but the process that makes tablets tablets subjects them to great amounts of pressure. This inherently raises the temperature inside the tablet, cooking everything in there. If this is new to you, for reference, consider directions for boiling water at different altitudes.

Secondly, from food sources is better than completely or mostly synthetic sources. If it's from a food source, there's a chance that you are also getting the cofactors that make vitamins work. This is also why it's so important that the vitamin is not heated to excess (see above). Aim especially for capsules that claim to be from "raw" food. The vitamins are always subjected to heat to some extent, but the less so, the better.

Thirdly, in my opinion, it's better to take multiple capsules per day (as the one full dose), than a one-a-day type vitamin. This last point is purely subjective, and it may stem from my hating of one-a-day tablets.

Consider also /not/ taking a multivitamin. If taking supplements makes you feel more in control of your regimen, consider megadosing on some of the ones with more evidence to support their use: vitamin D, fish oil, vitamin C, etceteras.

5cbd326041fead0c1ec71fbd106ef083

on January 20, 2012
at 10:32 PM

Thank you! I appreciate the time & input. In reading more since this original post (July), I've decided to do what you suggest in the last paragraph, and pick and choose those supplements I feel I'm lacking. So far, I'm taking fish oil and magnesium, but I'm considering Vit D during the winter months.

0
4fbceba10dc057ab6ef931d6873c7196

on September 16, 2016
at 12:53 PM

Because our soils are so depleted of vital nutrition, it is very important to supplement to make sure to intake the important amounts of macro and micro nutrients. However, the FDA regulates supplements so poorly and most companies fail testing when they are actually checked for purity and safety. The independent studies done on supplements are done on 18 different levels of testing. Everything form bio-availability to absorption rate to toxicity is tested. They are then rated on a 0-5 scale, 5 being the best. Out of THOUSANDS of companies tested every year ONLY 4 past the tests, all of them, completely. Unfortunately, you can not buy these brands in the stores. However, they are available online and through distributors. There is a book that publishes the results of those tests, as well as the ratings. It is "The Comparative Guide to Nutritional Supplements". You can get it off of Amazon for probably $15. It is a great resource when choosing a supplement company. If you would like to contact me to learn more about those companies, the regulations or the testing, feel free to contact me

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