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How much vitamin C?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 17, 2010 at 12:47 AM

While Vilhjalmur Stefansson showed how little vitamin C is required by carnivorous humans, how much vitamin C is needed for optimal health? Should meat and organ-only paleos take supplements for it?

6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on February 17, 2010
at 01:20 AM

I saw that this morning, interesting theory.

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3 Answers

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693b4a92133c19c288277dae8b43ab69

on February 17, 2010
at 01:16 AM

Peter at Hyperlipid just posted about this today...although his examples are mostly about guinea pigs, hedgehogs, tarsier monkeys and fruit bats - there's a lot of food for thought in his post. http://high-fat-nutrition.blogspot.com/2010/02/ok-ascorbate-and-lpa.html

In the comments, he notes that he does not supplement.

6b73f0c4b971e2dde7147920e329fe7f

(2041)

on February 17, 2010
at 01:20 AM

I saw that this morning, interesting theory.

1
E35e3d76547b18096a59c90029e7e107

(15613)

on February 17, 2010
at 04:46 PM

Meat only paleos can definitely do very well without taking vitamin C. If you're eating organs (liver being the best rich) then you'll doubtless be getting enough anyway. (Incidentally meat seems to have some strange nutrient-sparing properties generally, Hyperlipid has also noticed that a little meat seems to drastically reduce vitamin d deficiency).

If you're having carbs, then plenty vitamin C is paleo. Mass supplementation with vitamin C doesn't seem to have lived up its promise (a la Linus Pauling), but I think it's entirely plausible that extra doses of vitamin C would bring positive benefits (Peter draws the analogy with niacin). Presumably getting these doses from masses of cabbage would be preferable to supplements (not least in terms of absorption). Absolutely huge doses of cabbage might well not be paleo but it's still possible that it's optimising. I don't stress about it, but I think even when eating close to ZC, getting a good dose of vitamin C from some veg is ideal. Even in the lowest of LC, there's still glucose in the bloodstream and so likely benefits to having vitamin C.

0
Bdcb4ecc75f7b6867b785a7eadf25ece

on December 18, 2013
at 02:46 PM

Vitamin C isolated hmmmm...

vitamins do not exist as single components in nature they do not act on their own. Vitamins are made up of several different components – enzymes, co-enzymes, and co-factors– that must work together to produce their intended biologic effects, optimally.. Vitamins that are found naturally in whole foods come with all of their necessary components. but processing does casue some loss and degradition, The majority of vitamins that are sold in pharmacies, grocery stores, and vitamin shops are synthetic vitamins, which are only isolated portions of the vitamins that occur naturally in food.not really much good eh ? A good example is vitamin C. If you take a look at a variety of vitamin C supplements, you will find that the majority of them contain only ascorbic acid or a compound called ascorbate, which is a less acidic form of acorbic acid. Ascorbic acid is NOT vitamin C. It represents the outer ring that serves as a protective shell for the entire vitamin C complex, much like an orange peel that serves as a protective shell for an orange. Real vitamin C found in whole foods like fruits and vegetables contain the following components: Rutin Bioflavonoids (vitamin P) Factor K Factor J Factor P Tyrosinase Ascorbinogen Ascorbic Acid When you take only ascorbic acid found in your synthetic vitamin C tablet or powder, your body must gather all of the other components of the full vitamin C complex from your body’s tissues in order to make use of it. In the event that your body does not have adequate reserves of the other components, ascorbic acid itself does not provide any of the health benefits that the full vitamin C complex does. After circulating through your system, the unused ascorbic acid is eliminated through your urine. Just like vitamin C, almost all other vitamins that we know of offer their full health benefits when they are in the presence of a number of enzymes, co-enzymes, co-factors, and even minerals. For example, Vitamin D may have as many as twelve different active components, while vitamin P has at least five different components. The mineral copper is needed for full vitamin C activity, while vitamin E works closely with the mineral selenium to provide its health promoting, anti-oxidative effect. Clearly, it is best to get your vitamins from whole foods because whole foods provide complete vitamins rather than fractions of them. In many cases, whole foods also provide the minerals that are necessary for optimal vitamin activity. For example, sunflower seeds are an excellent whole food source of vitamin E and the mineral selenium, both of which need each other to offer their full health benefits. How do you know if the vitamins on your kitchen counter are from whole foods or if they are synthetic? If the list of ingredients includes an actual vitamin like Vitamin C” rather than an actual food that contains natural vitamin C like “acerola cherry powder”, you can bet that it is a synthetic vitamin. I would stick to bell peppers or the like ..

best to eat lets say a small red bell pepper circa 220 % of recommended vic C in it with many other nutrients too, tastes good too..

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