0

votes

Hibiscus tea a good source of thiamine?

Commented on February 18, 2014
Created February 12, 2014 at 7:04 PM

Being as paleo is rather restrictive on foods that tend to be high on b1, would tea be a good way of supplementing...without the supplement? I know teas in general can be undesirable, and herbal teas in particular can have specific 'side effects'. (oxalic acid and acting a pseudo-drugs)

Google has told me that hibiscus tea is indeed high in b1, and there are no serious listed side effects from drinking it -- unless pregnant. But it does say something about it containing an estrogen or possibly influencing estrogen....hmm. Would be interested in opinions of 'safety'. ( yes, I know it wont kill me :P)

If there is a better way to do it I'm all ears, seems I would have to add a considerable amount of veggies or nuts or fish to my diet to get up to the RDI otherwise -- would rather not do these things. (sadly only high b1 foods seem to be legumes and nuts -- high 06) :(

Adding lots of veggies is my 2nd favorite choice.

E also seems difficult to get...

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on February 18, 2014
at 12:12 AM

Nice that someone else knows about sideritis. I have friends in Italy, and when I discovered that sideritis is so abundant they sell sideritis honey, I asked them for a bag of the dried stuff. I will get it only this summer obviously, but I will report.

Bac49edb31092c3d6db9d461485cb310

on February 17, 2014
at 03:21 PM

Blaylock says that "cheesy" taste is from lots of free glutamic acid. If your BBB is in good health & you don't eat too much, it may not be too much of a problem.

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on February 16, 2014
at 02:38 PM

Curious, is there a non-fortified nutritional yeast? I could only find brands that added a bunch of B vitamins after the fact...kind of defeats the purpose. ^^

I did find 'brewers' yeast, which was not fortified and had reasonable amounts of B vitamins, but I feel like that could be an issue with being active or containing gluten?

3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on February 12, 2014
at 07:57 PM

Nutritional yeast is gluten-free, so it's ok to use -- as long as you're not allergic to it (some people are). You an sprinkle it to anything you'd like a cheesy flavor, yes.

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on February 12, 2014
at 07:54 PM

And could I just sprinkle the yeast on anything? -- Damn character limits!

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on February 12, 2014
at 07:50 PM

Sorry, was actually trying to imply they did have similar effects to what most people consider as 'drugs' -- synthetic -- although I guess herbs as you mentioned could and should be considered drugs in many cases.

I appreciate all the suggestions, I will look into properly treated lentils and yeast powder -- for some reason I though yeast was a no-no because of it's associations with bread. I'm trying to avoid nuts because my 06/03 ratio isn't terribly good, and they are quite high in 06.

Would there be any reason in particular to not to go with the tea though? Or with the yeast?

  • 7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

    asked by

    (300)
  • Views
    2.8K
  • Last Activity
    1461D AGO
Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

5 Answers

best answer

0
3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on February 12, 2014
at 07:17 PM

Herbal teas are not pseudo-drugs, they're actually very effective drugs for many ailments. Don't take my word for it, here's a lot of research for the most potent herbal tea, the Greek Mountain Tea, aka Sideritis: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/?term=sideritis It's weird that this specific herbal tea is not suggested as a superfood among Paleos, because it is. It's just not well-known.

Regarding your question about B1. Indeed, Paleo doesn't provide enough B1. This is its Achilles heel in my opinion. I solved the problem with lentils. New research: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09540100220137655 shows that when we clean, soak and well-cook lentils (and SOME other beans, not all), lectins aren't a problem anymore. They're then more benign than nuts. So, add a cup of lentils per week to your diet. I personally buy the sprouted lentils from Whole Foods, which have given me ZERO problems associated with legumes (no gas, no bloating, no nothing).

Alternatively, if you don't want to eat lentils, eat some sunflower seeds, or pepitas, or make kale chips that have yeast powder on them (it will give them a cheesy flavor). Yeast extract is the food with the highest B1 content: about 5 times the RDA in a single tablespoon.

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on February 12, 2014
at 07:50 PM

Sorry, was actually trying to imply they did have similar effects to what most people consider as 'drugs' -- synthetic -- although I guess herbs as you mentioned could and should be considered drugs in many cases.

I appreciate all the suggestions, I will look into properly treated lentils and yeast powder -- for some reason I though yeast was a no-no because of it's associations with bread. I'm trying to avoid nuts because my 06/03 ratio isn't terribly good, and they are quite high in 06.

Would there be any reason in particular to not to go with the tea though? Or with the yeast?

7904c7276d7e48f1be887fabd263bfd9

(300)

on February 12, 2014
at 07:54 PM

And could I just sprinkle the yeast on anything? -- Damn character limits!

Bac49edb31092c3d6db9d461485cb310

on February 17, 2014
at 03:21 PM

Blaylock says that "cheesy" taste is from lots of free glutamic acid. If your BBB is in good health & you don't eat too much, it may not be too much of a problem.

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on February 18, 2014
at 12:12 AM

Nice that someone else knows about sideritis. I have friends in Italy, and when I discovered that sideritis is so abundant they sell sideritis honey, I asked them for a bag of the dried stuff. I will get it only this summer obviously, but I will report.

0
Bac49edb31092c3d6db9d461485cb310

on February 17, 2014
at 03:52 PM

Oh, and GFB has around 3x the thiamine of grain-fed. Nice.

http://jas.fass.org/cgi/content/abstract/87/9/2961?maxtoshow=&hits=10&RESULTFORMAT=&fulltext=Effects+of+winter+stocker+growth+rate+and+finishing+system+on%3A+III&andorexactfulltext=and&searchid=1&FIRSTINDEX=0&sortspec=relevance&resourcetype=HWCIT

0
Bac49edb31092c3d6db9d461485cb310

on February 17, 2014
at 03:24 PM

Re: vitamin E, most is packaged with PUFAs as plants make it not because they were designed by Dog to help us but because they need it to prevent oxidation of fragile PUFAs. Thus, the best sources of V_E are fats low in PUFAs like red palm oil. Grass-fed beef fat is also a much better source of V_E than grain-fed (although, contrary to popular opinion, there isn't that much more of PUFA in grain-fed than in grass-fed, just a bad ratio due to very low n-3)

0
Bac49edb31092c3d6db9d461485cb310

on February 17, 2014
at 03:20 PM

Organ meats, especially hearts, are also a good thiamine source. Lamb in general is, like pork, a better source than beef for some reason. Surprisingly, most vegetables are fairly poor sources.

0
94480caec9fbbaacc386d86a45efa720

(1007)

on February 17, 2014
at 03:16 PM

Lean pork meat is a good source of thiamine - chops, roasts, etc. If you can get a reasonably decent source of it, incorporate it into your eating plan a couple of times a week. Search paleohacks for more on thiamine and pork.

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!