3

votes

Foods to moderate because of mineral/micronutrient overload?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created June 28, 2012 at 7:53 PM

I know Brazil nuts are high in selenium, and an ounce (roughly half a dozen) provides 800 micrograms. That's about double the U.S. recommended tolerable upper limit.

What are other foods we should moderate intake of because of the potential for overloading on their micro nutrients (vitamins, minerals etc)?

Since this is paleohacks, no need to include grains and legumes for anti-nutrients :)

Organs I am sure are high up there for their minerals and fat soluble vitamins. What else?

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on June 29, 2012
at 07:44 PM

Yeah, most sea vegetables are probably not a problem. But kelp and a few others (several brown algae) seem uniquely rich. Not super common foods sure, but I wouldn't recommend eating them carelessly.

43f469552cfd3be73fc88a9821b14986

on June 29, 2012
at 05:02 PM

I am a huge fan of NutritionData. I search it many times a week. It is an enormous database but missing some things like Red Palm Oil that is highest in Vitamin E etc. I wish they had an iphone app for NutritionData.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 29, 2012
at 04:49 PM

Though if you Google iodine and Japan, you see non-autoimmune hypothyroidism as well. Probably those folks consuming many milligrams daily or those susceptible. I don't think most non-Japanese are going to over-do iodine from sea veg. Also, there's a YouTube video of some real Chinese being fed beef & broccoli and they're like "WTF is this?". I know, not Japanese, but I don't think broccoli is well known in Asia. Cabbage, yes.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on June 29, 2012
at 02:42 PM

I have heard that thyroid problems more common in Japan, not sure of my source as well. And perhaps the goitrogens in Japanese cuisine (brocolli, soy, cabbage, etc.) mitigate the effects of this much iodine. But do I agree 1.1 mg is a bit low for a UL.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 29, 2012
at 11:42 AM

I've read (don't ask me where) that iodine consumption in parts of Japan are 10+ mg daily. 1.1 mg/d seems a bit low to be problematic.

1bbcd2122d9c75b07440f22ef57d6448

(2934)

on June 28, 2012
at 09:41 PM

Polar bear liver. Vitamin A is one hell of a micronutrient.

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3 Answers

3
543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on June 29, 2012
at 08:57 AM

I use the NutritionData nutrient search tool to find out this sort of info.

here are a few searches;
beef and calf liver are high in copper
oysters are high in zinc
duck and goose liver are high in iron

43f469552cfd3be73fc88a9821b14986

on June 29, 2012
at 05:02 PM

I am a huge fan of NutritionData. I search it many times a week. It is an enormous database but missing some things like Red Palm Oil that is highest in Vitamin E etc. I wish they had an iphone app for NutritionData.

3
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on June 29, 2012
at 08:01 AM

Kelp and a few other sea vegetables have a lot of iodine. The amount in each tends to vary, but eating a few ounces could easily put you over the upper limit of 1.1 mg/d.

I also hear eating pennies minted after 1982 can cause zinc toxicity. So moderate your penny consumption, people!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 29, 2012
at 04:49 PM

Though if you Google iodine and Japan, you see non-autoimmune hypothyroidism as well. Probably those folks consuming many milligrams daily or those susceptible. I don't think most non-Japanese are going to over-do iodine from sea veg. Also, there's a YouTube video of some real Chinese being fed beef & broccoli and they're like "WTF is this?". I know, not Japanese, but I don't think broccoli is well known in Asia. Cabbage, yes.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on June 29, 2012
at 07:44 PM

Yeah, most sea vegetables are probably not a problem. But kelp and a few others (several brown algae) seem uniquely rich. Not super common foods sure, but I wouldn't recommend eating them carelessly.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 29, 2012
at 11:42 AM

I've read (don't ask me where) that iodine consumption in parts of Japan are 10+ mg daily. 1.1 mg/d seems a bit low to be problematic.

A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on June 29, 2012
at 02:42 PM

I have heard that thyroid problems more common in Japan, not sure of my source as well. And perhaps the goitrogens in Japanese cuisine (brocolli, soy, cabbage, etc.) mitigate the effects of this much iodine. But do I agree 1.1 mg is a bit low for a UL.

2
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 29, 2012
at 11:52 AM

Brazil nuts are a good example, because of the rather narrow range between deficiency and toxicity for selenium. Fat soluble vitamins (e.g. vitamin A) also tend to have a more narrow range. The other issue is dealing with nutrients that block absorption of similar nutrients. Zinc, Copper, and Iron interact with each other. Excesses of one inhibit absorption of another.

Paleos love their liver, but look at the nutrient profile. Very high in real vitamin A, depending your your own bodies vitamin A needs, daily liver could be problematic. Liver is also disproportionately high in copper vs zinc. 30:1 in favor of copper. Daily liver could mess with zinc levels. Luckily the rest of the cow is zinc rich: 1:6 in favor of zinc.

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