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Do humans make their own vitamin K1? i don't eat plants and i seem to be fine?

Answered on January 16, 2014
Created January 12, 2014 at 11:57 AM

Hello everyone. I have been reading a lot recently about vitamin K, especially K1 and K2. Now i have found a way to ensure i meet my K2 needs, but i constantly read that the best sources of K1 are leafy green vegetables. This may sound a bit controversial but i thought human beings could not digest cellulose, so how could we have obtained K1 from eating raw leafy green veg unless we cooked it? and we never evolved eating cooked foods,so we must have obtained K1 from elsewhere during evolution? Also during ice ages there were very little green veggies to eat so where did our ice age ancestors get their K1 from? (inuit people spring to mind regarding this too) i am wondering therefore if humans make their own K1? because i don't eat leafy greens and i seem to be fine K1 wise.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on January 16, 2014
at 12:47 AM

Not sure I would say liver is 'loaded' with vitamin K. There's a tiny bit in there, very dependent on animal feeding.

79923ea5a1b335c3eb8f06e84b09850a

on January 15, 2014
at 03:31 PM

Also Matt11, i read that K1 didn't stay in the body long at all and needed eating every day. This is what got me thinking because it is not water soluble like vitamin C, and it sounds far more believable that the body would store/recycle it as opposed to needing to eat it every day. I know the human body produces some and i wonder if the amount is enough if you omit things like grains, sugar and vegetable oils from your diet?

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on January 12, 2014
at 04:06 PM

The latter part is not accurate. Collards, for example, resist temperatures that kill grass around here. 14F without cover is the norm. Same for kale, corn salad, miner lettuce and arugula. There are greens less resistant than grass (lettuce), other about as hardy as grass (radicchio,chard), and other still hardier than grass.

79923ea5a1b335c3eb8f06e84b09850a

on January 12, 2014
at 12:13 PM

Also, if vitamin K1 is a fat soluble vitamin, then why is the best source a very low fat food? (leafy greens) surely it would be found in fat? or as i suspect, maybe we synthesize it ourselves? Thanks for any input/thoughts, i appreciate it. Mark.

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7 Answers

0
79923ea5a1b335c3eb8f06e84b09850a

on January 16, 2014
at 11:52 AM

Hello HebridesWoman, this is the bit which confuses me.....vit K1 is a fat soluble vitamin but we are told the best sources are leafy green vegetables?! Like you, i would have thought fat or fatty foods would be the best source? and like i said earlier how would our ancient ancestors have accessed the nutrients from leafy greens wthout cooking them to break down the cellulose? and where did humans get leafy greens during thousands of years of ice ages?! On saying that, i have read Kale is high in omega 3 fats, so maybe Kale is classed as high fat?! or maybe parts of the animal we no longer eat nowadayssupplied vitamin K1? Like i say my blood clots fine so maybe i'm worrying too much about it. Hello James, i am fine with K2 it is just K1 i am trying to solve as i am still not convinced by the leafy green veg necessity. I know we produce some K1 ourselves but i have read this is not enough? but, then again, maybe it is enough if you omit cereals, vegetable oils, refined sugars etc from your diet?

0
5e36f73c3f95eb4ea13a009f4936449f

(8280)

on January 16, 2014
at 02:13 AM

You may or may not be able to digest the food to get K1/K2, but your gut bacteria can. That's where a lot of it comes from.

0
5b65bdb7a2385333dff64b40b575fddd

on January 15, 2014
at 08:13 PM

Very tecky answers above. Mine rather simple. Vit K fat soluble= eat healthy fats should be sufficient Vit K. Think oily fish, eggs, & liver (I know no fat involved, but loaded with Vit K). I hope that's helpful.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on January 16, 2014
at 12:47 AM

Not sure I would say liver is 'loaded' with vitamin K. There's a tiny bit in there, very dependent on animal feeding.

0
79923ea5a1b335c3eb8f06e84b09850a

on January 15, 2014
at 03:27 PM

Thanks for your thoughts people. So, is it fair to say that our ancesters (especially those living during the ice ages) managed to get their K1 because they ate parts of the animal which contain it but which are, shall we say, less appetizing to us modern humans? and we can obtain it from leafy plants like Kale because the cell walls are not as fibrous/tough as grasses? I thought with K1 being fat soluble it would have been found in animal fat? and AnyonesGhost, i have no idea i am afraid. I am quite active and eat meat, fish (some fried and sometimes raw herrings as rollmops) cockles in lemon juice, gouda cheese, dripping, grass fed butter, liver occasionally and some vegetables. I don't eat leafy green veg and it is only while i was reading about vitamin K2 that i came across K1 and saw the best sources as leafy green veg.....this got me thinking about other possible sources and where our ancestors got K1 from. I've just read about massaging Kale to break the plant cell walls down.....maybe our ancestors performed something similar by rubbing the leaves etc? Thanks again for your thoughts

79923ea5a1b335c3eb8f06e84b09850a

on January 15, 2014
at 03:31 PM

Also Matt11, i read that K1 didn't stay in the body long at all and needed eating every day. This is what got me thinking because it is not water soluble like vitamin C, and it sounds far more believable that the body would store/recycle it as opposed to needing to eat it every day. I know the human body produces some and i wonder if the amount is enough if you omit things like grains, sugar and vegetable oils from your diet?

0
Eb87941a669017dfb288d296cc672130

on January 12, 2014
at 06:57 PM

You say you seem to be fine, and I believe you, but what's your total energy expenditure (TEE) like relative to your basal metabolic rate (BMR: the energy you need to maintain your body's tissues and organs without having to move, digest, or do anything else)?

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on January 12, 2014
at 03:53 PM

Vitamin K1 or K2 is necessary. K1 converts to K2 in animals (including humans). Vitamin K is recycled so nutritional needs are quite low (similar to vitamins C and B12 which are so actively recycled). It's also fat-soluble so storage is easy, and thus deficiency is hard to induce.

Inuit do seem to have adequate vitamin K consumption on average (see: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3225107/table/T2/ ). They do consume plant matter when available and store it for later consumption. But do not use an outlier culture as the basis for your dietary science! The Inuit are but one culture out of 10000s in the world, the bulk do consume plenty of plant matter and plenty vitamin K1.

0
8b9c2dcd3dfc929a0428d3d6dac4918e

(70)

on January 12, 2014
at 03:40 PM

If its in human mammal bodies, it must follow that its also in other mammal bodies, yes? Somewhere, just as there is vitamin C in various organs and animals (such as I believe, in the innuits case, seal skin? I think vit c may also be in the eyes).

If its in the bodies of animals, whether from plants or not, we can get it from the animal source too, if we eat nose to tail, and a wide spectrum of animal types.

I think the plant walls of leafy greens are not the same as grass or leaves, and are thinner though. Also freezing breaks the plant cell walls. All just guessing from what little I know.

56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on January 12, 2014
at 04:06 PM

The latter part is not accurate. Collards, for example, resist temperatures that kill grass around here. 14F without cover is the norm. Same for kale, corn salad, miner lettuce and arugula. There are greens less resistant than grass (lettuce), other about as hardy as grass (radicchio,chard), and other still hardier than grass.

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