4

votes

Sublingual vitamin D3 spray

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 11, 2011 at 5:50 AM

I found this in my local health food shop today: http://www.rawliving.eu/d3-spray-d-lux-1000.html

"The formula is microemulsified for optimal uptake and utilisation and enters directly into the blood supply rather than being processed by the digestive system. Each measured spray delivers 1000iu."

It seemed good value for a 15 ml bottle where each spray is 0.14 ml, i.e. the entire bottle contains more than 100 sprays x 1000 IU = 100.000 IU

What I would like to know is, does anyone have any experience with sublingual D3? It's meant to be absorbed much better since it enters systemic circulation directly through the sublingual veins, bypassing the intestines altogether and thus resulting in higher blood levels for the same amount taken. What do you think? Does this seem plausible? Has anyone tested their D levels before and after using sublingual D3?

Thanks

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 11, 2011
at 03:34 PM

Think mercola hawks a B and a coq10 sublingual spray

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 11, 2011
at 03:24 PM

Not sure about B12: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1884303/

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5 Answers

2
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 11, 2011
at 01:48 PM

Sounds like a gimmick to me. D3 requires further processing by the body to be converted to the active form of Vitamin D in the body, so it doesn't seem likely that a quickly-absorbed sublingual dose would be all that effective. I'm sure it's priced higher than 1000 IU caps.

Plus, most paleo folks would probably say that 1000 IU is too small of a dose.

0
089dd41b18fbb95ebb5347cded708d98

(5635)

on November 14, 2012
at 05:51 PM

sublingual vit d is awesome. that's the only kind i use. my vit d is always in the perfect range when i get it tested. i have UC so i can't absorb nutrients too well.

0
Cbdc8318738324492f2d5918868ce4c9

(1211)

on November 14, 2012
at 01:21 PM

Sublingual appears to have benefits for those with digestion or intestinal absorption issues.

Note that it is still possible to get too much sublingual Vitamin D (blood calcium excess) and it is different than synthesizing Vitamin D from the sun, where the body has more natural regulations.

Vitamin D: Oral or Sublingual?

I recommend SUBLINGUAL route for the absorption of vitamin D supplement as compared to the oral ingestion. Why? Because sublingual absorption takes vitamin D directly into the systemic circulation just like when vitamin D is naturally synthesized in the skin from exposure to sun.

In contrast, vitamin D from the oral ingestion is absorbed into the portal circulation from the intestines, which takes it to liver first before entering into the systemic circulation. In this way oral ingestion is not very physiological and sublingual absorption is more physiological.

This point becomes even more important in people who have problems with digestion, such as people with pancreatitis, Crohn’s disease, irritable bowel syndrome, gluten sensitivity, celiac disease, tropical sprue, and in people who take medications that can interfere with the intestinal absorption of vitamin D such as seizure medicines, cholestyramine, orlistat, and people with stomach bypass surgery including those with lap-band procedures.

Zaidi MD, Sarfraz (2012-04-26). Power of Vitamin D New Scientific Research Links Vitamin D Deficiency to Cancer, Heart Disease, Diabetes, High Blood Pressure, Kidney Disease, Fibromyalgia, ... Diseases, Dental Problems and Depression. (p. 143). Sarfraz Zaidi, MD. Kindle Edition.

0
368568eb91f1b58d2f52c9c566d331b5

(182)

on October 11, 2011
at 02:35 PM

Maybe if you were sick.. but besides that I can't think of any reason to pay more for this product. D3 pills are effective and cheap and getting it into the body quickly isn't typically necessary.

Makes me wonder, does anyone know which vitamins and minerals do benefit from sublingual administration (as far as absorbtion/bioavailability)?

The only ones I know of off-hand are B12, and maybe zinc.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on October 11, 2011
at 03:24 PM

Not sure about B12: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1884303/

667f6c030b0245d71d8ef50c72b097dc

(15976)

on October 11, 2011
at 03:34 PM

Think mercola hawks a B and a coq10 sublingual spray

0
A968087cc1dd66d480749c02e4619ef4

(20436)

on October 11, 2011
at 12:57 PM

http://neurotalk.psychcentral.com/thread140620.html

It is plausable. It might be more effective - but regular D3 works pretty well and is really cheap. It shouldn't be less effective in any case - the D3 that doesn't absorb directly will get swallowed and processed just like a pill.

One adavntage of a sublingual is getting faster absorption - good for when you want something in the bloodstream quickly. But vitamin D hangs out in the body for months, so I don't see the need to get it in faster. Try it if you like, and let us know what you think.

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