6

votes

seasonal vit D variations

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created November 15, 2011 at 9:26 PM

So, I'm a firm believer in following seasonal variations in carb intake, sleep timing, total hours slept, etc.

When we artificially keep our vit D levels in the 60-80 range all year round, are we missing out on anything?

Are there any unintended consequences from not allowing our D levels to drop over the winter?

96061d386f8929f50a4d71e0420e3d5d

(208)

on November 30, 2011
at 12:40 AM

The military sent me, the salmon, moose, caribou and 24 hour summer days keep me...

F3d83ed057afe031152f4dc07c80a763

(40)

on November 16, 2011
at 11:11 AM

This post was amazing and fascinating!

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on November 16, 2011
at 01:14 AM

good observation Ashley

Medium avatar

(39821)

on November 15, 2011
at 11:34 PM

Oh man...you have my sympathies. Any particular reason for moving up there?

Medium avatar

(39821)

on November 15, 2011
at 11:32 PM

Yeah, I'd rather just model my life after an equatorial template and then make slight adjustments as necessary. It's like refusing to wear a jacket in winter because your parents were poor and went without themselves. Rather just do what makes the most sense all the time.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on November 15, 2011
at 11:12 PM

That's what I'm wondering, and if they did thrive there is probably some mechanism that allows it. Something like autophagey when we eat low protein, but on a yearly level.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on November 15, 2011
at 11:11 PM

I just try to stay in the 60-80 range, through sunshine, sunbeds, and vit D supplementation

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on November 15, 2011
at 11:11 PM

I just try to stay in the 60-80 range

E5c7f14800c5992831f5c70fa746dc5c

(12857)

on November 15, 2011
at 09:45 PM

what latitude are you trying to emulate?

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5 Answers

7
Medium avatar

on November 15, 2011
at 10:57 PM

Might it be that hominin populations outside of the tropics thrived in spite of the seasonal dip in vitamin D and that emulating such a cycle would be suboptimal for health? Same might go for anything else.

64433a05384cd9717c1aa6bf7e98b661

(15236)

on November 15, 2011
at 11:12 PM

That's what I'm wondering, and if they did thrive there is probably some mechanism that allows it. Something like autophagey when we eat low protein, but on a yearly level.

Medium avatar

(39821)

on November 15, 2011
at 11:32 PM

Yeah, I'd rather just model my life after an equatorial template and then make slight adjustments as necessary. It's like refusing to wear a jacket in winter because your parents were poor and went without themselves. Rather just do what makes the most sense all the time.

3
96061d386f8929f50a4d71e0420e3d5d

(208)

on November 15, 2011
at 11:09 PM

I have lived 150 miles south of the Arctic Circle for over 10 years. This will be my first winter supplementing with Vit D. I never thought much about Vit D before discovering paleo, but i'm sure my levels were super low. Used to be I'd gain 15-20lbs in the winter and lose (most) of it the next summer. I've managed to lose over 50lbs since January eating paleo and exercising. It's tough to get motivated right now. Today's sunrise/sunset were 9:27am - 3:48pm. We lose 6-8 minutes a day until Dec 21st then start gaining. By then the sun is only up about 2 hours. Today's high temp was -15 and expecting -35 tonight...

Medium avatar

(39821)

on November 15, 2011
at 11:34 PM

Oh man...you have my sympathies. Any particular reason for moving up there?

96061d386f8929f50a4d71e0420e3d5d

(208)

on November 30, 2011
at 12:40 AM

The military sent me, the salmon, moose, caribou and 24 hour summer days keep me...

2
1da74185531d6d4c7182fb9ee417f97f

on November 15, 2011
at 11:32 PM

Yeah but didn't a lot of traditional cultures, such as the inuit, Celts or Nordic people specifically eat vitamin D rich seafoods throughout the year to offset their dark seasons? Cod liver, seal blubber, etc?? If there was a dip, I doubt it was a significant one

543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on November 16, 2011
at 01:14 AM

good observation Ashley

F3d83ed057afe031152f4dc07c80a763

(40)

on November 16, 2011
at 11:11 AM

This post was amazing and fascinating!

1
Ed983a42344945b1ff70fd9597a23493

on November 15, 2011
at 10:54 PM

I don't know the answer to your question, though I suspect that like most issues, it is highly individual. I know that for myself, if I were nomadic, I would be heading south for the winter to more warmth, more sun, and therefore, more vitamin D. From past personal experience, I know that I get pretty lethargic and depressed in these low light times if I don't supplement D and tan at a tanning bed(about ten minutes at a time three to four times per week). Perhaps this is a reflection of the fact that my ancestors were much more recently closer to the equator, and this would be a totally different scenario if my ancestors had been more northern/ mountain dwelling for millenia.

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