2

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Hypothyroidism and K-2

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created April 30, 2012 at 3:04 PM

I was wondering if it is wise to take K-2 since I have hypothyroid. I know that I should avoid cruciferous veg, kale, collards, broccoli, etc, and that seems to be the natural food source for k-2. Any thoughts?

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on May 04, 2012
at 08:45 PM

Great recommendations, thanks!

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on May 04, 2012
at 03:41 PM

I've read a lot of conflicting reports on supplementing iodine as well; if you decide to do so I would get some Norweigan kelp tablets (Country Life is one of my preferred brands) rather than just straight supplemental iodine. Personally I lean more towards whole food sources; I roll various things up in nori sheets, substitute dulse flakes for salt every now and then, and try to eat shellfish at least once or twice a week.

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on May 04, 2012
at 12:19 PM

Wow, thank you for this information....some makes me sad tho, I got a beautiful fermenting crock for Christmas, and I love sweet potatos and have been eating them as one of the few safe starches, i love greens too, sigh......more N1 stuff for me :-(

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on May 04, 2012
at 12:14 PM

Thank you for these links, I really like Westin A Price, and the live strong link is good too. I do wonder about iodine, I've read conflicting reports on it.I guess an N1 test maybe for me?

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on May 04, 2012
at 12:09 PM

Thank you the correction...DOH, glad to know K-2 is ok, and really glad to know cooked greens are ok if limited. Thanks for the link Bruno.

685e3c967e63b4eacccf02628fd9a3ac

(1026)

on April 30, 2012
at 06:48 PM

Those veggies contain k1, not k2. NewEra - not just the goiterogenic compounds are doing the harm for hypothyroid people. K2 is wise to take, since it would help with calcium http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11706280

8634d4988ced45a68e2a79e69cc01835

(1617)

on April 30, 2012
at 04:07 PM

Cruciferous veg are ok if they are well-cooked. Most of the goiterogenic compounds go bye-bye when they are well-cooked.

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5 Answers

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4
8508fec4bae4a580d1e1b807058fee8e

on May 01, 2012
at 01:30 AM

Paleo Helps Woman Get Off Thyroid Medication! http://robbwolf.com/2012/06/04/11360/

I have to believe iodine and selenium is fairly important especially if consuming goitrogens and fermented vegetables. My husband and I were consuming about 1-2 pounds of COOKED goitrogenic vegetables per day with no supplemental iodine or selenium. We were using sea salt which doesn't have much iodine. We started to develop symptoms like fatigue, feeling cold, cold hands etc. These symptoms happened in both low carb and higher carb contexts, although higher carbohydrate may mask thyroid symptoms - this was mentioned multiple times at Paleo FX in Austin.

Within days of slow adding kelp supplementation (building from 150 mcg to currently 600 mcg over a month) and 150-200 mcg of selenium daily we notice a big difference in energy and not feeling cold. We have also limited our goitrogens by eliminating fermented vegetables since we do fine with raw dairy for probiotics.

We thought cooking and eating lots of saturated fat would take care of the goitrogens, but apparently that wasn't enough for us. So I compiled this list to help those trying to limit goitrogens or have had a similar experience.

Non-Goitrogenic Produce

Avocado - improves thyroid function

Banana, Plaintain

Berries (except strawberries), Cherries, Citrus (lemon, lime, grapefruit, orange, etc.), Melons

Apricots, Dragonfruit, Starfruit, Grapes, Guava, Kiwi, Lychee, Mango, Apple, Pineapple, Pomegranate

Nightshades - Peppers (sweet/bell and hot), Eggplant, Tomatoes, Potatoes

Squashes - Cabeza, Zuccinni, Yellow, Butternut, Pumpkin, Bittermelon (Corolla) technically fruit

Peas, Green Beans, Carrots

Okra

Asparagas, Artichoke

Lettuce, Celery, Cucumber

Herbs - Oregano, Basil, Thyme, Parsley, Cilantro, Parsley

Mushrooms

Onions, Leeks, garlic, shallots, chives

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goitrogen Goitrogens are substances that suppress the thyroid gland by interfering with iodine uptake, which can, as a result, cause an enlargement of the thyroid, i.e., a goitre.

Fermented Vegetables in brine (salt water) NOT vinegar have high Goitrogens since the bacteria convert more to that form as in Sauerkraut, Kimchi, Pickle, etc. Certain raw foods (cooking inactivates some of the goitrogens, except in the cases of soy and millet) have been identified as goitrogenic. These goitrogenic foods include:

Cassava (Tapioca), Sweet Potatoes, Rutabagas, Radishes (inc. Daikon), Turnips

Soybeans (and soybean products such as tofu, soybean oil, soy flour, soy lecithin) (High)

Pine nuts, Peanuts, Flaxseeds, Lima Beans

Millet (High)

Strawberries, Pears, Peaches (low)

Bamboo shoots

Spinach

Vegetables in the genus Brassica (cruciferous)

Bok choy, Choy sum, Mizuna Tatsoi,

Broccoli, Broccolini, Broccoflower, Kai-lan (Chinese broccoli), Rapini, Cauliflower

Brussels sprouts, Cabbage, Chinese cabbage

Canola (Rapeseed), Yu Choy,

Collard greens, Mustard Greens, Kale

Horseradish

Kohlrabi

Mustard (low)

Despite being generally a stimulant, caffeine (examples: coffee, tea, cola, chocolate) acts on thyroid function as a suppressant. Indeed some studies on rats suggest that excess caffeine in conjunction with a lack of iodine may promote the formation of thyroid cancers. Masterjohn recommends no more then 5 servings of goitrogens/week and Kresser no more then 3-6 servings/week for anyone with thyroid issues.

Paul Jaminet, Chris Masterjohn, and Chris Kresser have written well on this.

http://www.westonaprice.org/basics/bearers-of-the-cross

Fermentation makes soy goitrogens worse! http://blog.cholesterol-and-health.com/2010/10/fermentation-does-not-neutrailize.html

https://s3.amazonaws.com/ppccontent/PPCGoitrogen.pdf

For more Paleo Diet hacks: Have you had a possible iodine and/or selenium deficiency (or symptoms of it) on an ancestral diet even with cooking goitrogens? - PaleoHacks.com http://paleohacks.com/questions/111727/have-you-had-a-possible-iodine-and-or-selenium-deficiency-or-symptoms-of-it-on#ixzz1tZqqlDIu

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on May 04, 2012
at 12:19 PM

Wow, thank you for this information....some makes me sad tho, I got a beautiful fermenting crock for Christmas, and I love sweet potatos and have been eating them as one of the few safe starches, i love greens too, sigh......more N1 stuff for me :-(

2
7bf306ada57db47547e9da39a415edf6

(11214)

on December 20, 2012
at 09:40 PM

K2 is found only in animal products; K1 is in plants, and the few times I've got supplements with K1 it made me feel rather weird. So, get some K2 and avoid the vegetable stuff.

1
0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on April 30, 2012
at 03:39 PM

Cruciferous veges contain what are known as goitrogenic compounds - things that will interfere with the uptake of iodine in the body, potentially exacerbating existing thyroid conditions. For this reason, it isn't a bad idea to limit them while you're working through these issues.

Green veges are generally a good source of vitamin K1, but not K2; and one is not converted into the other in the body. As far as I know pastured dairy is the only way to get much of the MK4 form of K2 in the diet. Fermented foods (natto especially) will contain a bit of the MK7 form, which is debatably less useful in the body. Most (all?) of Weston A. Price's research around K2's synergistic affects was focused on MK4 K2.

In any case: I don't know of any direct relations between the K vitamins and thyroid function, but it would be a good idea to continue limiting goitrogenic foods and try to eat shellfish and seaweed on a regular basis to support the thyroid.

(Edit: I googled my summation just to fact-check myself and came across an article saying the same: http://www.livestrong.com/article/520288-vitamin-k-the-thyroid/)

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on May 04, 2012
at 08:45 PM

Great recommendations, thanks!

662a4ea915eb7c758bdd797d77ead7b6

(656)

on May 04, 2012
at 12:14 PM

Thank you for these links, I really like Westin A Price, and the live strong link is good too. I do wonder about iodine, I've read conflicting reports on it.I guess an N1 test maybe for me?

0d0842381492a41b2173a04014aae810

(4875)

on May 04, 2012
at 03:41 PM

I've read a lot of conflicting reports on supplementing iodine as well; if you decide to do so I would get some Norweigan kelp tablets (Country Life is one of my preferred brands) rather than just straight supplemental iodine. Personally I lean more towards whole food sources; I roll various things up in nori sheets, substitute dulse flakes for salt every now and then, and try to eat shellfish at least once or twice a week.

0
19ff515e8ec02d95e8f2cf68c3ec1373

(1207)

on December 20, 2012
at 08:41 PM

I don't have an answer, just more questions.

I have too high estrogen and too low tsh. I'm taking a lot of DIM to get my estrogen down. What do I do know?

0
531b053b68e92ac509fc1544f88dc103

(1205)

on December 20, 2012
at 08:17 PM

I have hypothyroidism and every time I try to supplement with kelp or eat seaweed on a regular basis, I gain belly fat and get brain fog. I think the iodine is messing me up. But I also take K2 and it has no effect on my thyroid.

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