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How much Vitamin K2 does fermented bean curd and black beans have?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created January 22, 2013 at 4:18 AM

I'm looking for a natural source of vitamin K2 other than natto and am wondering about the level in fermented bean curd and fermented black beans (both of which, like natto, are fermented soybeans). These two inexpensive items are available at any Asian supermarket. I'd prefer to adhere to the Paleo principle of get nutrients in natural or near-natural form rather than via supplement, when possible.

Any studies?

Edit:
"Fermented bean curd", for those unfamiliar, usually come in spicy square blocks, packed tightly in glass jar containers, and are traditionally used to flavor food. See the following links:

Fermented bean curd
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fermented_bean_curd

Fermented black beans
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Douchi

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on February 10, 2013
at 01:12 PM

I suppose some people need an excuse to eat something harmful, and use something someone else has said out of context and do so by ignoring the disclaimer at the very top of Mark's post, and the very bottom portion on phytoestrogen. In a world full of xenoestrogens from plasticizers, it would be unwise to volunteer to ingest more, in search of dubious sources of K2. As Mark said "I think controversial foods become so because we simply expect far too much. We learn about a possible benefit, and before you know it, food manufacturers are adding soy protein to lollipops."

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on February 10, 2013
at 01:12 PM

I suppose some people need an excuse to eat something harmful, and use something someone else has said out of context and do so by ignoring the disclaimer at the very top of Mark's post, and the very bottom portion on phytoestrogen. In a world full of xenoestrogens from plasticizers, it would be unwise to volunteer to ingest more, in search of dubious sources of K2. Ask Mark said "I think controversial foods become so because we simply expect far too much. We learn about a possible benefit, and before you know it, food manufacturers are adding soy protein to lollipops."

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on January 22, 2013
at 03:31 PM

from what i understand the soy will remain estrogenic and goitrogenic in spite of teh fermentaiton. That said, I infrequently enjoy some hatcho miso...

24c27817ad9ac518946dda4a131737b5

on January 22, 2013
at 12:45 PM

Mark Sisson recommends fermented soy bean, remarking that the fermentation processes destroys unwanted compounds in soybeans. Not claiming I agree - I personally wouldn't know. I mentioned natto because some on this board do not seem to have a problem with using it as a rich source of K2. http://www.marksdailyapple.com/10-things-to-know-about-tofu/

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1 Answers

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96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on January 22, 2013
at 11:54 AM

Except that neither beans, nor especially soy, are paleo, and are actually quite harmful.

If you really want to know, you can try here: http://nutritiondata.self.com/ or if they don't have it, google similar terms.

24c27817ad9ac518946dda4a131737b5

on January 22, 2013
at 12:45 PM

Mark Sisson recommends fermented soy bean, remarking that the fermentation processes destroys unwanted compounds in soybeans. Not claiming I agree - I personally wouldn't know. I mentioned natto because some on this board do not seem to have a problem with using it as a rich source of K2. http://www.marksdailyapple.com/10-things-to-know-about-tofu/

Eed7dabde3d61910685845e04605267f

(2934)

on January 22, 2013
at 03:31 PM

from what i understand the soy will remain estrogenic and goitrogenic in spite of teh fermentaiton. That said, I infrequently enjoy some hatcho miso...

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on February 10, 2013
at 01:12 PM

I suppose some people need an excuse to eat something harmful, and use something someone else has said out of context and do so by ignoring the disclaimer at the very top of Mark's post, and the very bottom portion on phytoestrogen. In a world full of xenoestrogens from plasticizers, it would be unwise to volunteer to ingest more, in search of dubious sources of K2. Ask Mark said "I think controversial foods become so because we simply expect far too much. We learn about a possible benefit, and before you know it, food manufacturers are adding soy protein to lollipops."

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19463)

on February 10, 2013
at 01:12 PM

I suppose some people need an excuse to eat something harmful, and use something someone else has said out of context and do so by ignoring the disclaimer at the very top of Mark's post, and the very bottom portion on phytoestrogen. In a world full of xenoestrogens from plasticizers, it would be unwise to volunteer to ingest more, in search of dubious sources of K2. As Mark said "I think controversial foods become so because we simply expect far too much. We learn about a possible benefit, and before you know it, food manufacturers are adding soy protein to lollipops."

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