3

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How Much Natto Is Too Much?

Answered on September 12, 2014
Created January 05, 2011 at 7:25 AM

After reading about natto, I expected it to be a horrendous food that I'd be able to choke down once a week at best, but I had some earlier and found it to be completely inoffensive. I'm now thinking about eating it every day, but I wonder if it would be too much K2 at that point. I'm consuming a lot of K1 every day via 2 cups of lightly steamed spinach and a stalk of steamed broccoli, so I'm not sure if some kind of clotting issue could arise as a result of too much total vitamin K.

I suspect that it is not at all out of the realm of possibility that a Japanese person could eat a serving of it every day (along with plenty of K1 as well), and it seems that they would have made the association if people were dropping dead.

Any thoughts?

0f44d81f247518d6fc2de0403ff9a68a

on September 01, 2013
at 03:26 AM

@mephjiu: It's also "Nattō" in German. See http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Natto

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 31, 2013
at 10:24 PM

So there is "too much". Switch to oysters.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on December 17, 2012
at 10:12 PM

Natto is "paleo" in that it is a traditionally consumed fermented product, in the same way that Kimchi or Saurkraut is processed and fermented. Many "paleo" people use fermented soy products (like soy sauce), but many stay away. Your choice.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 17, 2012
at 09:37 PM

Maybe because it's fermented?

77877f762c40637911396daa19b53094

(78467)

on July 01, 2011
at 06:23 PM

Natto is fermented soy beans. its get gluey and sticky. and looks a bit like eating spagheti or cheesemacs.I worry on natto that is can have GMO soy and that the salt which is just is very poor salt. best is to make a brand who sells organic natto.

Efc949694a31043bfce9ec86e8235cd7

(970)

on January 05, 2011
at 06:56 PM

My mother is from Japan, so I grew up with natto and love the stuff. Traditionally, it's served in the morning. However, I really dig it for dinner at a sushi bar...natto handroll, no rice, add cucumber slivers. K2 and iodine (from nori) all at once. Just consume it quickly or you'll end up with a slimy mess in your hand!

135ea7e598ac8517e26ac2896309e776

(161)

on January 05, 2011
at 01:20 PM

I'm sorry but my dictionary can't translate natto for me. Could you please tell me what it is?

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7 Answers

7
9bc6f3df8db981f67ea1465411958c8d

on January 05, 2011
at 10:14 AM

I wouldn't worry about getting too much K2 out of natto, I would rather worry about the phytoestrogens and lectins in the soy as well as its goitrogenic properties. Even though it's fermented, some nasties are just very hard to eliminate completely.

Here is an interesting bit: http://blog.cholesterol-and-health.com/2010/10/fermentation-does-not-neutrailize.html

K2 doesn't play any part in the blood clotting properties of K1, so don't worry about total vit. K consumption.

Here is a lengthy, but really interesting article on K2, also by Chris Masterjohn: http://www.westonaprice.org/abcs-of-nutrition/175-x-factor-is-vitamin-k2.html

2
Medium avatar

on January 05, 2011
at 06:27 PM

I suppose that's a good point. I wonder if 50g a day would do more harm than good. Seems like the broccoli could mitigate the phytoestrogens and the lectins should be largely diminished by the fermentation. I take fairly substantial doses of iodine from eating Laminaria digitata a few times a week, so a goiter is nigh on impossible.

According to that article, K1 maxes out at about 200??g, so the 1600??g that I take in stops being relevant at that point. And, as you said, it doesn't have a synergistic effect with K2.

Overall, I think I'll have 1 serving a day and see how things go. It's not out of the ordinary for me to eat a couple dozen eggs in a week and I love hard cheese and chicken liver, so I am already getting a fair amount of K2, but I think this boost could be beneficial.

Thanks for the help.

P.S. I had some this morning for breakfast and I will say that it is a food best served for dinner. I read that the smell was like ammonia, but I find it to be more reminiscent of coffee or chocolate or something along those lines, but the texture is not something you want to wake up to.

Efc949694a31043bfce9ec86e8235cd7

(970)

on January 05, 2011
at 06:56 PM

My mother is from Japan, so I grew up with natto and love the stuff. Traditionally, it's served in the morning. However, I really dig it for dinner at a sushi bar...natto handroll, no rice, add cucumber slivers. K2 and iodine (from nori) all at once. Just consume it quickly or you'll end up with a slimy mess in your hand!

1
Eaa1ddfbd5ad750cddf0f7f0f61fa2e7

on August 31, 2013
at 09:31 PM

I love natto so much I was eating it every day.

Natto has a good amount of iron. I was eating alot of red meat and natto everyday for a couple of months was throwing off my body. When I cut back on the natto, my symptoms went away. At one point I think I was getting too much iron which can be toxic and damaging to vital organs.

The soy content was messing up my hormones also. I was having quicker menstrual cycle and bleeding alot. Very unusual for me. My cycle has been alot less last exaggerated but not back to normal.

This was just my experience and everyone will respond differently.

Medium avatar

(10611)

on August 31, 2013
at 10:24 PM

So there is "too much". Switch to oysters.

1
A0f2f0f632d42215944a798486bddde1

(1377)

on August 23, 2011
at 01:59 PM

Natto is high in nutrients and seems to have a lot of health benefits; I first heard about it in Tim Ferris' "4-Hour Body," and I want to try it sometime soon. However, I won't be eating it more than once a week. Why? I'm not so concerned about estrogen and such, but according to the USDA database, 1 cup of natto has almost 10mg Omega-6 (PUFA is 2/3 total fat). If you're eating natto regularly, it'll really mess up your 3/6 ratios.

0
56c28e3654d4dd8a8abdb2c1f525202e

(1822)

on September 01, 2013
at 02:15 AM

More of interest is why do large amounts of MK7 effectively replace the smaller, recommended amounts of animal sourced MK4. Say what you wish about Omega 6 fats in soy, eating an avocado is just as bad.

0
Medium avatar

(10611)

on December 17, 2012
at 07:17 PM

What makes natto even remotely paleo? A processed soybean product. Sheesh. Next thing you know edamame and tofu will be paleo.

4b5be253ac1981c690689cab7e4bf06d

(3043)

on December 17, 2012
at 10:12 PM

Natto is "paleo" in that it is a traditionally consumed fermented product, in the same way that Kimchi or Saurkraut is processed and fermented. Many "paleo" people use fermented soy products (like soy sauce), but many stay away. Your choice.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on December 17, 2012
at 09:37 PM

Maybe because it's fermented?

0
E0eadd4bf4d5eebcac2b90ba8db65480

on December 17, 2012
at 06:39 PM

I listened to an interview by a dr. who did some great research on vitamin K and she said there were not any toxicity concerns for too much K. Whatever anyone's opinion on Dr. Mercola, the interview with the dr who wrote of Vit. K is on his site. Check it out and make your own opinion.

Btw, would you share how you're eating your natto? Soy sauce, mustard? I'm eager to try it but would like some tested ways to eat it. Thanks :)

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