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Would taking Vitamin K with Aspirin ameliorate deleterious side-effects specifically as it relates to bleeding?

Commented on February 06, 2014
Created February 05, 2014 at 5:34 PM

Aspirin is a first line of defense against secondary prevention for heart disease and new research is showing promising potential between Aspirin and a Plethora of cancers. Aspirin is a relatively safe and cheap drug with few known side effects. The most pronounced side effects are related to internal bleeding. Might taking vitamin k with Aspirin ameliorate this side effect? Has anyone seen any research to this effect?

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/12/12/opinion/the-2000-year-old-wonder-drug.html?_r=0

http://www.forbes.com/sites/melaniehaiken/2012/05/30/aspirin-the-new-anti-cancer-wonder-drug/

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 06, 2014
at 01:40 PM

Depends who you talk to regarding MK-4 versus 7. Natural sources except natto are MK-4, natto is MK-7.

47cbd166d262925037bc6f9a9265eb20

(55)

on February 06, 2014
at 07:49 AM

There may be many other things I use that may be decreasing the chances of pain but they aren't known to do so in the doses I use, and I'll stop using ashwagandha in a teaspoon of many many dried herbs because that may be increasing chances of pain, especially for joints. I think eliminating nightshades makes a big difference for joints certainly at least in most people. Binding of glyconutrients or not also makes a difference so I eat my cucumber and pumpkin cooked but juicing may also be effective since it gets rid of most of the proteins.

47cbd166d262925037bc6f9a9265eb20

(55)

on February 06, 2014
at 07:43 AM

As far as I know NSAIDs aren't good for gut health and can significantly increase permeability, I actually felt it after using diclofenac after not using any NSAID for months and since then I'm not using NSAIDs for more than a year. My diet and lifestlye probably reduces the chances of pain significantly and I've been able to eliminate the headaches that happened rarely with some cherries/sourcherries.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on February 06, 2014
at 03:23 AM

Thanks for the input Matt, +1. You're basically saying the same thing as YLBody it looks like.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on February 06, 2014
at 03:22 AM

Cool, thanks YLBody!

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on February 05, 2014
at 10:48 PM

That's great to hear moors! No need to apologize, aspirin seems to me like a fine thing to use for pain, as long as you are not 16 or younger because in this subset of the population you may be more at risk for developing Reye's syndrome. Also, if you are using it for chronic pain management I would consult a doctor and know that it may increase risk of internal bleeding, which can be serious. Diet and supplementation can definitely also be applied if they are working for you then that is great. I'm not sure if I fully understood your question though, perhaps you could rephrase it?

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on February 05, 2014
at 10:42 PM

I definitely agree that vitamin k-2 is a valuable addition to most any diet! I'm not sure whether the mk-4 version or mk-7 version of k-2 is better though. That being said, my question is pertaining specifically to k1 because of this vitamin's ability to coagulate blood, something that k2 doesn't seem to have an effect on. Vitamin k2 seems to be related more to de-calcifying blood and putting calcium where it should be (in the bones) and take it away from where it shouldn't be (in blood vessels / arterial calcification).

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6 Answers

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Medium avatar

on February 06, 2014
at 12:22 AM

Aspirin and coumadin have two separate functions. Coumadin is an anticoagulant where vitamin K is the antidote and we give it quite frequently. Vitamin K would work by making one of your coagulation pathways more "clotable." Aspirin on the other hand works by targeting platelets. Platelets are often found near damaged tissue (such as that of a person who has inflamed arteries from heart disease and plaque buildup). Under normal circumstances platelets bind to "patch" the damaged area. If that patch gets too inflamed or too big it can break off and cause a stroke or heart attack or induce further bleeding and lead to a blood clot. So to answer your question....you're essentially taking the aspirin to keep your platelets from clumping together while the vitamin K helps your red blood cells clot easier.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on February 06, 2014
at 03:22 AM

Cool, thanks YLBody!

0
Medium avatar

on February 06, 2014
at 12:22 AM

Aspirin and coumadin have two separate functions. Coumadin is an anticoagulant where vitamin K is the antidote and we give it quite frequently. Vitamin K would work by making one of your coagulation pathways more "clotable." Aspirin on the other hand works by targeting platelets. Platelets are often found near damaged tissue (such as that of a person who has inflamed arteries from heart disease and plaque buildup). Under normal circumstances platelets bind to "patch" the damaged area. If that patch gets too inflamed or too big it can break off and cause a stroke or heart attack or induce further bleeding and lead to a blood clot. So to answer your question....you're essentially taking the aspirin to keep your platelets from clumping together while the vitamin K helps your red blood cells clot easier.

0
Medium avatar

on February 06, 2014
at 12:22 AM

Aspirin and coumadin have two separate functions. Coumadin is an anticoagulant where vitamin K is the antidote and we give it quite frequently. Vitamin K would work by making one of your coagulation pathways more "clotable." Aspirin on the other hand works by targeting platelets. Platelets are often found near damaged tissue (such as that of a person who has inflamed arteries from heart disease and plaque buildup). Under normal circumstances platelets bind to "patch" the damaged area. If that patch gets too inflamed or too big it can break off and cause a stroke or heart attack or induce further bleeding and lead to a blood clot. So to answer your question....you're essentially taking the aspirin to keep your platelets from clumping together while the vitamin K helps your red blood cells clot easier.

0
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on February 05, 2014
at 11:14 PM

There's a lot of different points on the coagulation pathway and I'm pretty sure that vitamin K and aspirin aren't acting on the same enzyme/point. Warfarin interacts at the same point as vitamin K, but other anti-coagulants (heparin, newer drugs…) act on different points in the coagulation pathway.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on February 06, 2014
at 03:23 AM

Thanks for the input Matt, +1. You're basically saying the same thing as YLBody it looks like.

0
3eca93d2e56dfcd768197dc5a50944f2

(11697)

on February 05, 2014
at 08:47 PM

I don't know about the specific question, however, I don't see why anybody should take vitamin K. What people usually need in western countries is K2 (if they don't eat fermented foods), which is not the same as K. Normal vitamin K is aplenty on Paleo.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on February 05, 2014
at 10:42 PM

I definitely agree that vitamin k-2 is a valuable addition to most any diet! I'm not sure whether the mk-4 version or mk-7 version of k-2 is better though. That being said, my question is pertaining specifically to k1 because of this vitamin's ability to coagulate blood, something that k2 doesn't seem to have an effect on. Vitamin k2 seems to be related more to de-calcifying blood and putting calcium where it should be (in the bones) and take it away from where it shouldn't be (in blood vessels / arterial calcification).

0
47cbd166d262925037bc6f9a9265eb20

(55)

on February 05, 2014
at 08:09 PM

I used to use painkillers often but I can do without them with my sort of paleo autoimmune protocol diet.

Sorry for questioning a question but, do you think aspirin is a good thing to use for pain or for more for some people while dietary changes or supplementation can also be applied ?

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10989)

on February 05, 2014
at 10:48 PM

That's great to hear moors! No need to apologize, aspirin seems to me like a fine thing to use for pain, as long as you are not 16 or younger because in this subset of the population you may be more at risk for developing Reye's syndrome. Also, if you are using it for chronic pain management I would consult a doctor and know that it may increase risk of internal bleeding, which can be serious. Diet and supplementation can definitely also be applied if they are working for you then that is great. I'm not sure if I fully understood your question though, perhaps you could rephrase it?

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