2

votes

1 cup Kale= 400% RDA of Vitamin K. Any cause for concern?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 17, 2013 at 7:21 PM

I'm trying to eat more greens.

When I entered my 4oz of raw Kale into cronometer.com, I was surprised that it showed 666% Vitamin K.

That number scared me (for several reasons).

Thoughts?

And: If I'm eating 4oz of Kale, is there any need for Vitamin K2 supplements? (I hear K & K2 are different)

Thanks, Mike

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on April 15, 2013
at 04:17 PM

I take more than 6000+% of K2-MK4 twice weekly. Not dead yet!

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on April 15, 2013
at 02:28 PM

Vitamin K **is** fat soluble but I wouldn't worry about toxic effects from eating a cup of greens, lol..

A0c49f398499246c623e6527e9dd5ca2

(548)

on February 18, 2013
at 03:40 PM

You are actually right. I mistook something. New recomendation for Mike: If you don't have another significant source of K2 in your diet, supplement it.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on February 18, 2013
at 02:22 PM

I guess like urine being bright yellow with excess vitamin B, good point. Unless, it's like a fat soluable vitamin.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on February 18, 2013
at 01:01 PM

Those numbers are still on the low side, particularly for those of us supplementing. People take those pricey drops daily - some take them 3 times a day, that's upwards of 3000 mcg daily of K2. I myself take 5000 mcg (5 mg) of K2 weekly (which is 8x the RDA).

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on February 18, 2013
at 08:23 AM

This link http://www.uspharmacist.com/content/d/in-service/c/32018/ gives conversion rates of between 5% and 10%. Another link worth reading here http://chriskresser.com/vitamin-k2-the-missing-nutrient

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on February 18, 2013
at 04:29 AM

Good point. Because cronometer.com showed my vitamin K level in RED, it scared me.

7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2040)

on February 18, 2013
at 12:14 AM

Very helpful, thanks.

Frontpage book

Get FREE instant access to our Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!

6 Answers

best answer

5
D7cc4049bef85d1979efbd853dc07c8e

(4029)

on February 18, 2013
at 12:16 AM

The RDA is the minimum, not the upper limit. There is no recognized upper limit for Vitamin K yet.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on February 18, 2013
at 04:29 AM

Good point. Because cronometer.com showed my vitamin K level in RED, it scared me.

3
32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on February 18, 2013
at 01:04 PM

Your body is not dumb or 100% efficient. It won't absorb more than it needs and if it does it's perfectly capable of excreting the excess. You're not absorbing all that K and if you did, your body is not so helpless than it can't deal with it.

The human body is extremely resilient, not fragile as you might think given paleo theory.

7fc82eebafd44badc73c520f44660150

(3275)

on February 18, 2013
at 02:22 PM

I guess like urine being bright yellow with excess vitamin B, good point. Unless, it's like a fat soluable vitamin.

Cb9a270955e2c277a02c4a4b5dad10b5

(10979)

on April 15, 2013
at 02:28 PM

Vitamin K **is** fat soluble but I wouldn't worry about toxic effects from eating a cup of greens, lol..

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on April 15, 2013
at 04:17 PM

I take more than 6000+% of K2-MK4 twice weekly. Not dead yet!

2
C00b2aa7978b64c72b9951f51019ef87

on February 18, 2013
at 04:15 AM

Even if you take a blood thinner, the key is consistency. There is a big fear about eating broccoli and kale out there. Just eat conistant servings. You just don't want to go from 0% for a month to 600% for a week. It makes it impossible for the doctor to control your levels. If you eat healthy green vegetables all of the time, your labs will be easy to read and your dose won't change every week.

2
A0c49f398499246c623e6527e9dd5ca2

(548)

on February 17, 2013
at 07:31 PM

Something like hypervitaminosis is so rare, that it seldomly occurs from eating real foods. As one's body will store the vit k in one's adipose tissue there is no need to eat a whole lot of leafy greens. Water-soluable vitamins however will excreted through your urin if they are available in excess.

Concerning the Vit K2 question: Your body will convert K1 to K2 at a fairly high conversion rate (about 85% percent if I remember it rightliy). So no. There's no real need to do that.

Make sure to eat your kale with a significant amount of fat, to increase it's bioavailability.

EDIT: Just found out that it's best for your bone and heart health to consume 10 times the amount of Vit K than recommended in the RDA. Thats 1000micrograms/ 1 cup of cooked kale.

A0c49f398499246c623e6527e9dd5ca2

(548)

on February 18, 2013
at 03:40 PM

You are actually right. I mistook something. New recomendation for Mike: If you don't have another significant source of K2 in your diet, supplement it.

4e184df9c1ed38f61febc5d6cf031921

(5005)

on February 18, 2013
at 08:23 AM

This link http://www.uspharmacist.com/content/d/in-service/c/32018/ gives conversion rates of between 5% and 10%. Another link worth reading here http://chriskresser.com/vitamin-k2-the-missing-nutrient

1
0b7c3e7fd96005f0b2dfd781e512fc2e

(1237)

on February 17, 2013
at 10:14 PM

I had been wondering about this myself, since I regularly exceed 500% of my vit K RDA, sometimes going over 1000%. I came across this: http://www.whfoods.com/genpage.php?tname=nutrient&dbid=112

Since no adverse effects have been reported for higher levels of vitamin K intake from food and/or supplements, there are no documented toxicity symptoms for vitamin K. Levels as high as 340 micrograms per day have been reported in U.S. diets, and if dietary supplements are included, daily intake levels as high as 367 micrograms have been reported. In animal studies, vitamin K has been provided in amounts as high as 25 micrograms per kilogram of body weight (or for an adult human weighing 154 lbs, the equivalent of 1,750 micrograms of vitamin K) without noticeable toxicity. For these reasons, the Institute of Medicine at the National Academy of Sciences chose not to set a Tolerable Upper Limit (UL) for vitamin K when it revised its public health recommendations for this nutrient in 2000.

7a6529ea25b655132fe58d793f95547a

(2040)

on February 18, 2013
at 12:14 AM

Very helpful, thanks.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41747)

on February 18, 2013
at 01:01 PM

Those numbers are still on the low side, particularly for those of us supplementing. People take those pricey drops daily - some take them 3 times a day, that's upwards of 3000 mcg daily of K2. I myself take 5000 mcg (5 mg) of K2 weekly (which is 8x the RDA).

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on February 17, 2013
at 08:18 PM

Unless you are on an anticoagulant (also known as rat poison) or otherwise at an abnormal risk of clotting, the body is very efficient at excreting excess vitamin K, so I would not worry about overdosing.

My understanding is that kale is K1, not K2. While K1 can be converted to K2, it is not sufficient to just consume K1 -- http://chriskresser.com/vitamin-k2-the-missing-nutrient

Answer Question


Get FREE instant access to our
Paleo For Beginners Guide & 15 FREE Recipes!