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Vitamin E from soybean oil?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created March 23, 2011 at 9:24 AM

Does anyone know how Vitamin E is extracted from soybean oil when they make supplements? I am wondering if this process can leave intact any of the isoflavones from soybean oil in the vitamin supplement derived from it?

EDIT: Look at the comment to the first answer below for my subsequent findings.

8f08fb03fc5c2f44b7d5357e8a3ab1c5

on March 25, 2011
at 05:44 PM

Soybeans were probably not consumed during the paleolithic, but this has nothing to do with the original question above. If you don't believe that industrial chemistry can be applied in beneficial ways, then I suggest you move as far away as possible from civilization.

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on March 24, 2011
at 04:28 AM

It is still not a product that ever could have been eaten by our paleo ancestors. Have you ever seen real soybeans up close? They are hard as rocks after mecanically harvesting. They dry out pretty quick. See the link below in answer to daz as to the chemical process to extract the oil. No part of it I want in my body http://www.soya.be/soybean-oil-production.php

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on March 24, 2011
at 02:36 AM

It is still not a product that ever could have been eaten by our paleo ancestors. Have you ever seen real soybeans up close? They are hard as rocks after mecanically harvesting. They dry out pretty quick. See the link below in answer to daz as to the chemical process to extract the oil. No part of it I want in my body.

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on March 24, 2011
at 02:31 AM

daz, Looking at what it takes to extract oil from beans, I would not want to ingest anything that has to use chemicals to extract oil from a plant. http://www.soya.be/soybean-oil-production.php Our paleo ancestors never did consume soybeans. I'll leave it to the vegans.

Cab7e4ef73c5d7d7a77e1c3d7f5773a1

(7314)

on March 23, 2011
at 11:54 PM

Why are you supplementing Vitamin E in the first place?

8f08fb03fc5c2f44b7d5357e8a3ab1c5

on March 23, 2011
at 11:06 PM

Thanks for the background info. So, I dug a little deeper and it turns out that refined soybean oil doesn't seem to have any of the things that make soy bad (for this I am only considering soy proteins and isoflavones, of which it is virtually devoid). It has a lot of omega 6, but at the amount of a few drops from a supplement, it turns out to be negligible, topping out at a very conservative maximum of a few hundred mg per very large drop (assuming drop volume is 1/10 of 1ml just to be on the safe side). I have edited the question to reflect these findings.

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5 Answers

1
543a65b3004bf5a51974fbdd60d666bb

(4493)

on March 24, 2011
at 12:16 AM

Dexter, referring to your comment

"refined soybean oil doesn't seem to have any of the things that make soy bad".

Did your further digging find that this is the case for all supplements with Soy, or do you think it may vary from brand to brand?

For example i have seen two brands that actually highlight that the 'bad stuff' has been removed (from the soy), one was Mercola;

"Mercola Vitamin E Mixed Tocopherols are derived from soybean oil. However, there is no reason to be concerned that these are from soy - as all of the negative elements of soy have been removed"

I also got this response from Mercola customer service

"It is the actual soy proteins and the phytoestrogens such as isoflavones that are removed from the Vitamin E. We have contacted the manufacturing facility to obtain a more definitive and precise answer and apologize that we were unable to provide a more definitive at this time"

(they never did get back to me with any further info).

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on March 24, 2011
at 02:31 AM

daz, Looking at what it takes to extract oil from beans, I would not want to ingest anything that has to use chemicals to extract oil from a plant. http://www.soya.be/soybean-oil-production.php Our paleo ancestors never did consume soybeans. I'll leave it to the vegans.

0
96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on March 28, 2013
at 02:22 PM

I'd prefer getting my E from much better sources. Red Palm oil for example. Cook a curry dish with it once a week or so, and you can get plenty; not only that, but you'd get a full spectrum of E, instead of DL-Alpha Tocopherols (the artificial version). You'd also get the gamma tocopherols which you likely won't find in most Vitamin E supplements.

I'm sure there are other sources as well, but this stuff is very tasty and a good source of fats.

0
Ec4750371b4f5b4dd23e102dc5bbe6a0

on March 28, 2013
at 05:05 AM

I did an experiment about the Vit.E which is purified from soybean. an elevation of fasting blood sugar in healthy volunteers was the result as compared with pure vit.E. what do you think the cause?

0
535fafe8afe6923870905c707c4f4454

on May 19, 2011
at 03:15 AM

This question I think has been on my mind since analyzing my nutrient daily intake. I get no where near close to 50% of the RDV of vitamin E ('RDV, so what?' you might say) through a varied diet of veges, coconut, beef, liver and moderate-low carbs. I seriously wonder if the recommended VitE consumption isn't achievable eating whole foods, unless I am missing some key food.

I haven't considered fruit yet however.

0
06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on March 23, 2011
at 12:46 PM

Can't help you on the chemical process of turning a soybean into an oil and extracting the Vit E...but I would not get anywhere near a soy product.

Hypogonadism and erectile dysfunction associated with soy product consumption. Siepmann T, Roofeh J, Kiefer FW, Edelson DG.

Center for Autonomic and Peripheral Nerve Disorders, Beth Israel Medical Deaconess Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA.

Abstract Previous research has focused on the beneficial effects of soy and its active ingredients, isoflavones. For instance, soy consumption has been associated with lower cardiovascular and breast cancer risks. However, the number of reports demonstrating adverse effects of isoflavones due to their estrogenlike properties has increased. We present the case of a 19-y-old type 1 diabetic but otherwise healthy man with sudden onset of loss of libido and erectile dysfunction after the ingestion of large quantities of soy-based products in a vegan-style diet. Blood levels of free and total testosterone and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) were taken at the initial presentation for examination and continuously monitored up to 2 y after discontinuation of the vegan diet. Blood concentrations of free and total testosterone were initially decreased, whereas DHEA was increased. These parameters normalized within 1 y after cessation of the vegan diet. Normalization of testosterone and DHEA levels was paralleled by a constant improvement of symptoms; full sexual function was regained 1 y after cessation of the vegan diet. This case indicates that soy product consumption is related to hypogonadism and erectile dysfunction. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of a combination of decreased free testosterone and increased DHEA blood concentrations after consuming a soy-rich diet. Hence, this case emphasizes the impact of isoflavones in the regulation of sex hormones and associated physical alterations.

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on March 24, 2011
at 04:28 AM

It is still not a product that ever could have been eaten by our paleo ancestors. Have you ever seen real soybeans up close? They are hard as rocks after mecanically harvesting. They dry out pretty quick. See the link below in answer to daz as to the chemical process to extract the oil. No part of it I want in my body http://www.soya.be/soybean-oil-production.php

06d21b99c58283ce575e36c4ecd4a458

(9948)

on March 24, 2011
at 02:36 AM

It is still not a product that ever could have been eaten by our paleo ancestors. Have you ever seen real soybeans up close? They are hard as rocks after mecanically harvesting. They dry out pretty quick. See the link below in answer to daz as to the chemical process to extract the oil. No part of it I want in my body.

8f08fb03fc5c2f44b7d5357e8a3ab1c5

on March 23, 2011
at 11:06 PM

Thanks for the background info. So, I dug a little deeper and it turns out that refined soybean oil doesn't seem to have any of the things that make soy bad (for this I am only considering soy proteins and isoflavones, of which it is virtually devoid). It has a lot of omega 6, but at the amount of a few drops from a supplement, it turns out to be negligible, topping out at a very conservative maximum of a few hundred mg per very large drop (assuming drop volume is 1/10 of 1ml just to be on the safe side). I have edited the question to reflect these findings.

8f08fb03fc5c2f44b7d5357e8a3ab1c5

on March 25, 2011
at 05:44 PM

Soybeans were probably not consumed during the paleolithic, but this has nothing to do with the original question above. If you don't believe that industrial chemistry can be applied in beneficial ways, then I suggest you move as far away as possible from civilization.

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