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Which fish/shellfish are the absolute best seafood sources of vitamin-D?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created October 26, 2012 at 3:30 PM

Are there certain fish/shellfish that tend to contain higher concentrations of vitamin D than others?

489d6842b84b920fabcb9eeb83783c91

(270)

on November 06, 2012
at 07:13 PM

IIRC - the question has been edited from iodine to VitD, which is why our responses all ref'ed iodine and seem like we're not addressing the question. zaitz - why edit your question days later when it could've helped someone in the future with your same question? why not just start a new question? That said, I'm sticking w/sardines! :)

Medium avatar

(3213)

on October 26, 2012
at 11:18 PM

No, the difference is made by how concentrated it gets once dried

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on October 26, 2012
at 11:16 PM

Why dry? If iodine is added to dry seaweed it is probably table salt that is making the difference

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3 Answers

3
489d6842b84b920fabcb9eeb83783c91

on October 26, 2012
at 09:05 PM

research sardines... a can of atlantic sardines (with bones!!) is a nutrient and Omega-3 bomb. :) if you draw a nutritional venn diagram you'll see how great this little fish is pound for pound.

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/finfish-and-shellfish-products/4114/2

(IIRC, a can has about 20-25% of daily iodine req - YMMV)

that said, no single fish will be perfect, so eat a variety of them (e.g. salmon, sardines, tuna) plus some seaweed.

sounds like i'm having sushi tonight! hehe

489d6842b84b920fabcb9eeb83783c91

(270)

on November 06, 2012
at 07:13 PM

IIRC - the question has been edited from iodine to VitD, which is why our responses all ref'ed iodine and seem like we're not addressing the question. zaitz - why edit your question days later when it could've helped someone in the future with your same question? why not just start a new question? That said, I'm sticking w/sardines! :)

2
Medium avatar

(3213)

on October 26, 2012
at 05:17 PM

All seafood is high in Iodine, but the highest is dry seaweed

http://www.healthaliciousness.com/articles/natural-foods-high-in-iodine.php

3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on October 26, 2012
at 11:16 PM

Why dry? If iodine is added to dry seaweed it is probably table salt that is making the difference

Medium avatar

(3213)

on October 26, 2012
at 11:18 PM

No, the difference is made by how concentrated it gets once dried

1
3ce6a0d24be025e2f2af534545bdd1d7

(26217)

on October 26, 2012
at 03:37 PM

Ocean fish are the best source of iodine (cod, tuna, perch, etc)

Ocean Shrimp and other crustaceans are good too.

Typically you will get about half of your daily value (for whatever that is worth other than comparison) from a fresh (not farmed) ocean fish serving and about a quarter from a serving of crustaceans.

Other great sources:
Seaweed (some seaweed species can give you 1000% of the DV in one serving!)
Dairy (yogurt, milk, cream) all give you about a third of the DV
Egg, 1 egg approximately 10% daily value

BTW, I know you were looking for three specific fish to be named. The problem is that, like with most living things, the devil is in the details. Where the fish were caught, time of year, whether they were fresh frozen or put into a tank, etc all changes the nutritional value of the fish. So it's not possible to say Cod has more than Tuna. It depends....

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