5

votes

Vitamin D Without Magnesium = Weird Side Effects?

Answered on August 19, 2014
Created February 29, 2012 at 12:25 AM

I've been taking 5,000IU of Vitamin D pretty much daily since I'm not getting much sun this winter.

It seems I get kinda light headed, dopey, and I feel "out of it". Is that because I'm magnesium deficient?

Yesterday I didn't take any Vitamin D, and I felt fairly normal. Could that be a hint to me?

Any ideas or suggestions?

This is what made me wonder:

http://www.naturalnews.com/029195_magnesium_vitamin_D.html

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 12, 2014
at 10:07 PM

Why don't you start a new question with this? Few folks will read your question here. In fact, I won't give you my opinion until you do this. :P

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on March 06, 2014
at 11:32 AM

Paleohacks isn't really here to drive traffic to your blog, especially when your "blog post" has an ad for "sign up here here to get my vitamin D report."

Please don't spam. We don't like spam.

B396a0ecd39520e322143a3f871a5939

(10)

on March 05, 2014
at 03:47 PM

Hi Uncle, If you have symptoms taking 5000 IU's, it's more likely to be a magnesium deficiency being expressed than an overdose. THere has NEVER been a recorded overdose on doses of 10,000 IU's a day or less.

http://www.easy-immune-health.com/Overdose-on-Vitamin-D.html Kerri

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on May 29, 2013
at 01:57 PM

There's usually quite a lag time between supplementing (via pill or sun) and getting high hydroxylated-vitamin D levels in serum. I wouldn't think that the short-term responses to vitamin D supplementation are due to hydroxylation issues.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:57 PM

I take 6000 IUs per day with NO issues. The Vitamin D Council has noted no toxicity at levels of 10,000 IUs per day. That said, it is always best to test if supplementing and see what your blood level is.

121a16aded2bed8dca492d3c9662ef4c

(1327)

on May 29, 2012
at 09:44 PM

I have observed exactly the same thing. When I take too much vitamin D, I get the spacey, uncomfortable feelings, dry hands and eyes, and find myself waking up in the early morning and having to pee a lot. If I spend a considerable amount of time in the sun -- say an hour or more, unprotected -- I get exactly the same response. Like Happy Now's, it's a delayed response, so it took me a while to make the connection. I've since concluded: it doesn't matter where you get your vitamin D, if it's too much, you're going to feel it. Note that at no time did I have measurable toxicity.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on March 01, 2012
at 03:27 AM

Good point about the K2 in there too. The balancing act for nutrients is more of a cascade effect, than a teeter-totter.

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on March 01, 2012
at 01:17 AM

Yes -- Masterjohn has talked about the link of unmasking low or depleted A and K2 and D. Not to be ignored lightly... ;) Everything is networked aaaahhh like PH and facebook haaa ahaaa!

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on March 01, 2012
at 01:03 AM

Yes -- Masterjohn has talked about the link of K2 depletion (like A, tocopherols, etc) with exogenous, supplemental D. Not to be ignored lightly... ;) Everything is networked aaaahhh like PH and facebook *haaa ahaaa!*

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on February 29, 2012
at 03:32 PM

I'm wary of pushing D3 to the level of lifeguards. This is another confirmation. 5000IU can already lead to moderately high levels. Yes, vitamin A is important to regulate D, and K2 to regulate calcium as well. High D3 -> slight hypercalcemia -> slight hypomagnesemia?

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on February 29, 2012
at 09:03 AM

I feel like it would be helpful to elaborate that what I believe were "sun poisoning" episodes, the icky feeling didn't hit during the time I was in the sun, it was many hours later in the evening, and I was very queasy and dizzy for a few days afterwards, so that doesn't seem like heat exhaustion. I could have very easily been low on magnesium at the time because I didn't supplement with it back then.

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on February 29, 2012
at 08:36 AM

EXCELLENT RESPONSE. Zinc and all the trace elements (selenium, molyb, manganese, iodine, etc) that are hard to get from todays big agra food crops are commonly deficient. Being on the SAD for decades does not help. I didn't know about the PTH rold in hydrylation. Thank you!

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on February 29, 2012
at 02:18 AM

My dad worked as a life guard and then coast guard for many years, and that's what he called it. Heat, dehydration, lack of mag could certainly play into it, but he said he both experienced it himself when the shifts went too long, and treated others for it. The body self-regulates to a point, but I think there is a reason even very dark-skinned people avoid the noontime sun in many places.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on February 29, 2012
at 02:00 AM

Unlikely to be Vitamin D poisoning from the sun, since the body self-regulates. Could be Magnesium deficiency, but honestly it sounds more like heatstroke.

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14 Answers

best answer

8
A2c38be4c54c91a15071f82f14cac0b3

(12682)

on February 29, 2012
at 04:49 AM

Magnesium deficiency can result in decreased function of the parathyroid. If you're taking a D3 supplement in the form of cholecalciferol (most supplements are I think) the body uses the parathyroid to hydroxylate that form of D3 into the active form. When you're magnesium deficient this process is impaired.

As to why you feel weird when you take the D3, I'm not really sure. It could be a magnesium thing, but it could be something else entirely.

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on February 29, 2012
at 08:36 AM

EXCELLENT RESPONSE. Zinc and all the trace elements (selenium, molyb, manganese, iodine, etc) that are hard to get from todays big agra food crops are commonly deficient. Being on the SAD for decades does not help. I didn't know about the PTH rold in hydrylation. Thank you!

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on May 29, 2013
at 01:57 PM

There's usually quite a lag time between supplementing (via pill or sun) and getting high hydroxylated-vitamin D levels in serum. I wouldn't think that the short-term responses to vitamin D supplementation are due to hydroxylation issues.

6
6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on February 29, 2012
at 01:44 AM

I've gotten vitamin D poisoning a few times from staying in the sun too long. I felt all dopey and dizzy, and a little queasy.

D from the sun supposedly gives you many times that dosage though, so I don't know if you have overdosed at that level. But, it is fat soluble so the effects could be cumulative.

When I have an unusual reaction to a supplement, I often question the other ingredients that are packaged into it or the formulation, and will experiment with another brand before blaming the vitamin itself. For example, I had to try a lot of varieties of magnesium before finding one I could tolerate.

Don't forget to keep your vitamin A intake up if you are taking D too.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on February 29, 2012
at 02:00 AM

Unlikely to be Vitamin D poisoning from the sun, since the body self-regulates. Could be Magnesium deficiency, but honestly it sounds more like heatstroke.

2870a69b9c0c0a19a919e54cb3a62137

(1520)

on February 29, 2012
at 03:32 PM

I'm wary of pushing D3 to the level of lifeguards. This is another confirmation. 5000IU can already lead to moderately high levels. Yes, vitamin A is important to regulate D, and K2 to regulate calcium as well. High D3 -> slight hypercalcemia -> slight hypomagnesemia?

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on February 29, 2012
at 09:03 AM

I feel like it would be helpful to elaborate that what I believe were "sun poisoning" episodes, the icky feeling didn't hit during the time I was in the sun, it was many hours later in the evening, and I was very queasy and dizzy for a few days afterwards, so that doesn't seem like heat exhaustion. I could have very easily been low on magnesium at the time because I didn't supplement with it back then.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on February 29, 2012
at 02:18 AM

My dad worked as a life guard and then coast guard for many years, and that's what he called it. Heat, dehydration, lack of mag could certainly play into it, but he said he both experienced it himself when the shifts went too long, and treated others for it. The body self-regulates to a point, but I think there is a reason even very dark-skinned people avoid the noontime sun in many places.

6120c989fd5b69f42a0834b69b87955b

(24553)

on March 01, 2012
at 03:27 AM

Good point about the K2 in there too. The balancing act for nutrients is more of a cascade effect, than a teeter-totter.

121a16aded2bed8dca492d3c9662ef4c

(1327)

on May 29, 2012
at 09:44 PM

I have observed exactly the same thing. When I take too much vitamin D, I get the spacey, uncomfortable feelings, dry hands and eyes, and find myself waking up in the early morning and having to pee a lot. If I spend a considerable amount of time in the sun -- say an hour or more, unprotected -- I get exactly the same response. Like Happy Now's, it's a delayed response, so it took me a while to make the connection. I've since concluded: it doesn't matter where you get your vitamin D, if it's too much, you're going to feel it. Note that at no time did I have measurable toxicity.

4
Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on February 29, 2012
at 12:48 AM

Don't know about your symptoms, but yes, you definitely need Magnesium.

Many of us are deficient in it. Read this:

http://www.vitamindcouncil.org/about-vitamin-d/vitamin-d-cofactors/

3
Be1dbd31e4a3fccd4394494aa5db256d

(17969)

on February 29, 2012
at 04:59 AM

I agree that many vitamin d adverse reactions are probably due to magnesium deficiency. I had actually just assumed that without reading anything about it, simply because of the reality of their relationship. It just makes sense. If you increase you need for magnesium without increasing your magnesium...you run into deficiency.

This question makes me smile, I'm glad everyone is getting a chance to see this and the other good answers. It could be vitamin a, as was suggested. Or something else, but I would put my money on magnesium.

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on March 01, 2012
at 01:03 AM

Yes -- Masterjohn has talked about the link of K2 depletion (like A, tocopherols, etc) with exogenous, supplemental D. Not to be ignored lightly... ;) Everything is networked aaaahhh like PH and facebook *haaa ahaaa!*

3864f9a2af09b1b447c7963058650a34

(3703)

on March 01, 2012
at 01:17 AM

Yes -- Masterjohn has talked about the link of unmasking low or depleted A and K2 and D. Not to be ignored lightly... ;) Everything is networked aaaahhh like PH and facebook haaa ahaaa!

2
Ec6e6cb0bee067776433dea987d6c844

on February 29, 2012
at 01:41 AM

I have not heard of these symptoms, but I take my D3 with Mg since excessive D3 leading to D3 toxicity is much more likely with Mg deficiency. They seem to go well rogether.

1
25f7d9bc6817cb34358661b4d67ddaa0

on May 29, 2013
at 11:46 AM

You know vitamin d uses magnesium to convert sun in to active form in to blood. This is very big mistake if you take more doses of vitamin d without taking magnesium. Its causing a lot of people have problems and that all are believe that this is all happening due to vitamin side effects but this is not quite true because doctors says magnesium deficiency. So we should take vitamin d with magnesium in consideration.

1
85ab8328de1aabccf880f050983b6f03

on January 12, 2013
at 03:57 PM

Don't let people create doubt in the minds of those who don't yet know the truth. With little or no sun exposure daily as long as you do not have a high amount of dietary vitamin D in retinol form - i.e cod liver oil, a vitamin D supplement at 5000i.u. will not poison you. To check your vitamin D level get a simple blood test called 25(OH)D, or 25-hydroxyvitamin D - Available from most doctors. Your level should be between 50-80ng/ml. Note that conventional medicine has gone to great lengths to lie to people about those values - their recommendations are way too low, often at 20 ng/ml. Other nutrients are necessary for optimal vitamin D3 utilization - magnesium, boron, maganese, strontium, vitamin K-2, omega-3s.

1
85ab8328de1aabccf880f050983b6f03

on January 12, 2013
at 03:56 PM

To clear up possible confusion - the self-regulation is with respect to blood vitamin D levels. They do not raise beyond a certain value no matter how much sun exposure you get. So vitamin D poisoning is impossible. Sun burn and heat stroke are certainly possible. Proper sun exposure means staying in the sun with 40%+ skin exposure for the amount of time required for YOU to reach that threshold value. No more, otherwise you risk damage. Determing the right amount of time depends on a few variables - how darkly pigmented your skin is, the angle of the sun from the horizon, and clouds.

0
2ab4288eb45412403c378e1e4231a318

on June 12, 2014
at 07:55 PM

Apologies for bumping an old thread, just have a question related to vitamin D/magnesium supplementation.

I tried supplementing with vitamin D a while ago, but experienced great anxiety and a jittery feeling as a result so stopped immediately. After conducting some research, I now feel confident that this reaction came about because the extra vitamin D was exacerbating a magnesium deficiency (which has been highlighted as low in the past through a hair mineral analysis).

I'd now like to try vitamin D again, this time alongside magnesium, but am still nervous about suffering from a bad reaction (it was pretty intense last time). My plan is to supplement 1000 IU of vitamin D and 300mg of magnesium glycinate.

My question is this:

If the unpleasant mental reactions to the vitamin D were caused by magnesium deficiency, then do you think taking both together will sort things out, or should I be taking magnesium on its own for a while first (say for a few weeks or months to build up levels in the body) before bringing D alongside it?

Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

Thank you.

32f5749fa6cf7adbeb0b0b031ba82b46

(41757)

on June 12, 2014
at 10:07 PM

Why don't you start a new question with this? Few folks will read your question here. In fact, I won't give you my opinion until you do this. :P

0
B396a0ecd39520e322143a3f871a5939

on March 05, 2014
at 03:40 PM

I've written a blog post about this below. The relationship between magnesium and vitamin d is very close. Vitamin D 'uses up' magnesium in it's conversion into the active form in the blood. It's always recommended that magnesium and vitamin D be taken together. Not only that, but if you have magnesium deficiency symptoms when you take vitamin D, there is a very good chance that you are 'outing' a subclinical magnesium deficiency which should not be ignored.

http://www.easy-immune-health.com/magnesium-and-vitamin-d.html Kerri

96440612cf0fcf366bf5ad8f776fca84

(19413)

on March 06, 2014
at 11:32 AM

Paleohacks isn't really here to drive traffic to your blog, especially when your "blog post" has an ad for "sign up here here to get my vitamin D report."

Please don't spam. We don't like spam.

0
6c331ba8ef1d5520389565da9d30cc3c

on May 29, 2013
at 11:26 AM

I have had the same experience with D3 supplements. I have only tried them twice and both times I get dizzy and light headed for 10-12 hours. I am extremely sun sensitive (auto-immune) and have been tested and am very low in Vitamin D which is why I'm trying to take it. I will try very much smaller dose and see how I tolerate it.

0
9a5e2da94ad63ea3186dfa494e16a8d1

on January 12, 2013
at 04:14 PM

IMHO, 5000 IU a day is a LOT. A few years ago I felt that I was deficient and I took 400IU a day and immediately felt a lot better. When I take 5000UI pills, I get back aches. I would do some research and see what dosage you might need and consider getting your serum levels checked. You might be overdosing.

Ce41c230e8c2a4295db31aec3ef4b2ab

(32556)

on January 12, 2013
at 04:57 PM

I take 6000 IUs per day with NO issues. The Vitamin D Council has noted no toxicity at levels of 10,000 IUs per day. That said, it is always best to test if supplementing and see what your blood level is.

B396a0ecd39520e322143a3f871a5939

(10)

on March 05, 2014
at 03:47 PM

Hi Uncle, If you have symptoms taking 5000 IU's, it's more likely to be a magnesium deficiency being expressed than an overdose. THere has NEVER been a recorded overdose on doses of 10,000 IU's a day or less.

http://www.easy-immune-health.com/Overdose-on-Vitamin-D.html Kerri

0
85ab8328de1aabccf880f050983b6f03

on January 12, 2013
at 03:57 PM

Always avoid sunburn - not always easy living a truly paleo lifestyle. Include nutrients which protect against sun damage. Essential fatty acids (EFAs) interact with Vitamin D in your skin to help protect against harmful radiation, in case of slight overexposure. Salmon Oil is a source of EFAs. Ultramarine Virgin Salmon Oil is minimally processed to ensure that all of natural trace elements are maintained. No high heat, bleaching, deodorizing or distillation, which would strip the natural oil of enzymes, trace elements and natural antioxidants. It also contains Astaxathin, a naturally occurring carotenoid found in salmon, as well as a natural lemon flavor and a proprietary natural antioxidant blend, resulting in a pleasant tasting product with improved stability. It is the highest pharmaceutical grade Omega-3 oil, sourced from cold water Salmon found in clean, deep Norwegian waters. The oil is manufactured in a pharmaceutically licensed production facility in Norway according to pharmaceutical production protocols. Quality control and quality assurance measures are carefully attended to throughout every step of the process. The raw material for this salmon oil is carefully selected and is fully traceable by batch. Every batch is extensively tested to insure freedom from environmental contaminants such as mercury, lead, arsenic, pesticides, PCB's and dioxins.

0
8dc9492bc0c2da430becc602dc5039a1

(0)

on January 12, 2013
at 02:55 PM

See Vitamin d council website for reliable info. A high vitamin d levels is often associated with a low magnesium body stores. You need to have adequate magnesium for the vitamin d to be utilized correctly. The worst scenario could be MS like symptoms caused by low body magnesium. I would suggest transdermal magnesium chloride as a way to get levels up quickly. You literally just spray it on your skin. (Also can be very effective for migraines).

NB: speaking from experience and also a former dietitian.

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